Heredity of chronic bronchitis: A registry-based twin study

Howraman Meteran, Vibeke Backer, Kirsten Ohm Kyvik, Axel Skytthe, Simon Francis Thomsen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Smoking is a major risk factor for lung diseases and lower respiratory symptoms, but since not all smokers develop chronic bronchitis and since chronic bronchitis is also diagnosed in never-smokers, it has been suggested that some individuals are more susceptible to develop chronic bronchitis due to genetics.

OBJECTIVE: To study the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on the variation in the susceptibility to chronic bronchitis.

METHODS: In a population-based questionnaire study of 13,649 twins, 50-71 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we calculated sex-specific concordance rates and heritability of chronic bronchitis. The response rate was 75%.

RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 9.3% among men and 8.5% among women. The concordance rate for chronic bronchitis was higher in monozygotic twins than in dizygotic twins among women; 0.30 vs. 0.17, but not among men; 0.15 vs. 0.18. The heritability of chronic bronchitis adjusted for smoking and age was 55% (36-71%) in women, whereas the susceptibility to chronic bronchitis in men for 25% (8-41%) was ascribable to familial environment but not to genetic factors.

CONCLUSIONS: Chronic bronchitis shows a moderate familial aggregation, particularly in women. Increased susceptibility to respiratory disease among female smokers relative to male smokers may have a genetic origin.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftKokyuukika
Vol/bind108
Udgave nummer9
Sider (fra-til)1321-6
ISSN1347-0051
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2014

Fingeraftryk

Twin Studies
Heredity
Chronic Bronchitis
Registries
Smoking
Dizygotic Twins
Monozygotic Twins
Lung Diseases

Citer dette

Meteran, Howraman ; Backer, Vibeke ; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm ; Skytthe, Axel ; Thomsen, Simon Francis. / Heredity of chronic bronchitis : A registry-based twin study. I: Kokyuukika. 2014 ; Bind 108, Nr. 9. s. 1321-6.
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title = "Heredity of chronic bronchitis: A registry-based twin study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Smoking is a major risk factor for lung diseases and lower respiratory symptoms, but since not all smokers develop chronic bronchitis and since chronic bronchitis is also diagnosed in never-smokers, it has been suggested that some individuals are more susceptible to develop chronic bronchitis due to genetics.OBJECTIVE: To study the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on the variation in the susceptibility to chronic bronchitis.METHODS: In a population-based questionnaire study of 13,649 twins, 50-71 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we calculated sex-specific concordance rates and heritability of chronic bronchitis. The response rate was 75{\%}.RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 9.3{\%} among men and 8.5{\%} among women. The concordance rate for chronic bronchitis was higher in monozygotic twins than in dizygotic twins among women; 0.30 vs. 0.17, but not among men; 0.15 vs. 0.18. The heritability of chronic bronchitis adjusted for smoking and age was 55{\%} (36-71{\%}) in women, whereas the susceptibility to chronic bronchitis in men for 25{\%} (8-41{\%}) was ascribable to familial environment but not to genetic factors.CONCLUSIONS: Chronic bronchitis shows a moderate familial aggregation, particularly in women. Increased susceptibility to respiratory disease among female smokers relative to male smokers may have a genetic origin.",
keywords = "COPD, Chronic bronchitis, Heritability, Twin studies",
author = "Howraman Meteran and Vibeke Backer and Kyvik, {Kirsten Ohm} and Axel Skytthe and Thomsen, {Simon Francis}",
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year = "2014",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.rmed.2014.06.010",
language = "English",
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pages = "1321--6",
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Heredity of chronic bronchitis : A registry-based twin study. / Meteran, Howraman; Backer, Vibeke; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Skytthe, Axel; Thomsen, Simon Francis.

I: Kokyuukika, Bind 108, Nr. 9, 09.2014, s. 1321-6.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heredity of chronic bronchitis

T2 - A registry-based twin study

AU - Meteran, Howraman

AU - Backer, Vibeke

AU - Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

AU - Skytthe, Axel

AU - Thomsen, Simon Francis

N1 - Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2014/9

Y1 - 2014/9

N2 - BACKGROUND: Smoking is a major risk factor for lung diseases and lower respiratory symptoms, but since not all smokers develop chronic bronchitis and since chronic bronchitis is also diagnosed in never-smokers, it has been suggested that some individuals are more susceptible to develop chronic bronchitis due to genetics.OBJECTIVE: To study the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on the variation in the susceptibility to chronic bronchitis.METHODS: In a population-based questionnaire study of 13,649 twins, 50-71 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we calculated sex-specific concordance rates and heritability of chronic bronchitis. The response rate was 75%.RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 9.3% among men and 8.5% among women. The concordance rate for chronic bronchitis was higher in monozygotic twins than in dizygotic twins among women; 0.30 vs. 0.17, but not among men; 0.15 vs. 0.18. The heritability of chronic bronchitis adjusted for smoking and age was 55% (36-71%) in women, whereas the susceptibility to chronic bronchitis in men for 25% (8-41%) was ascribable to familial environment but not to genetic factors.CONCLUSIONS: Chronic bronchitis shows a moderate familial aggregation, particularly in women. Increased susceptibility to respiratory disease among female smokers relative to male smokers may have a genetic origin.

AB - BACKGROUND: Smoking is a major risk factor for lung diseases and lower respiratory symptoms, but since not all smokers develop chronic bronchitis and since chronic bronchitis is also diagnosed in never-smokers, it has been suggested that some individuals are more susceptible to develop chronic bronchitis due to genetics.OBJECTIVE: To study the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on the variation in the susceptibility to chronic bronchitis.METHODS: In a population-based questionnaire study of 13,649 twins, 50-71 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we calculated sex-specific concordance rates and heritability of chronic bronchitis. The response rate was 75%.RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 9.3% among men and 8.5% among women. The concordance rate for chronic bronchitis was higher in monozygotic twins than in dizygotic twins among women; 0.30 vs. 0.17, but not among men; 0.15 vs. 0.18. The heritability of chronic bronchitis adjusted for smoking and age was 55% (36-71%) in women, whereas the susceptibility to chronic bronchitis in men for 25% (8-41%) was ascribable to familial environment but not to genetic factors.CONCLUSIONS: Chronic bronchitis shows a moderate familial aggregation, particularly in women. Increased susceptibility to respiratory disease among female smokers relative to male smokers may have a genetic origin.

KW - COPD

KW - Chronic bronchitis

KW - Heritability

KW - Twin studies

U2 - 10.1016/j.rmed.2014.06.010

DO - 10.1016/j.rmed.2014.06.010

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25049143

VL - 108

SP - 1321

EP - 1326

JO - Kokyuukika

JF - Kokyuukika

SN - 1347-0051

IS - 9

ER -