Helminthes could influence the outcome of vaccines against TB in the tropics

D Elias, H Akuffo, S Britton

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Helminthes, infections widespread in the tropics, are known to elicit a wide range of immunomodulation characterized by dominant Th2 type immune responses, chronic immune activation as well as up-regulated regulatory T cell activity. Such a wide range of immunomodulation caused by helminthes may have an impact on the host's ability to cope with subsequent infections and/or may affect the efficacy of vaccination. Indeed studies conducted in humans living in helminth-endemic areas and in animal models showed that helminth infection makes the host more permissive to mycobacterial infections and less able to benefit from vaccination. These observations have fundamental practical consequences if confirmed by large and appropriately controlled clinical studies. Eradication of worms could offer an affordable, simple and novel means to reduce the burden of the tuberculosis problem that at the moment seems to be getting out of control in sub-Saharan Africa. This information would also be of great relevance in the design of vaccines against diseases of major public health importance, including malaria and HIV/AIDS.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftParasite Immunology
Vol/bind28
Udgave nummer10
Sider (fra-til)507-13
Antal sider7
ISSN0141-9838
DOI
StatusUdgivet - okt. 2006

Fingeraftryk

Helminths
Africa South of the Sahara
Malaria
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Public Health
HIV
Clinical Studies

Citer dette

Elias, D ; Akuffo, H ; Britton, S. / Helminthes could influence the outcome of vaccines against TB in the tropics. I: Parasite Immunology. 2006 ; Bind 28, Nr. 10. s. 507-13.
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abstract = "Helminthes, infections widespread in the tropics, are known to elicit a wide range of immunomodulation characterized by dominant Th2 type immune responses, chronic immune activation as well as up-regulated regulatory T cell activity. Such a wide range of immunomodulation caused by helminthes may have an impact on the host's ability to cope with subsequent infections and/or may affect the efficacy of vaccination. Indeed studies conducted in humans living in helminth-endemic areas and in animal models showed that helminth infection makes the host more permissive to mycobacterial infections and less able to benefit from vaccination. These observations have fundamental practical consequences if confirmed by large and appropriately controlled clinical studies. Eradication of worms could offer an affordable, simple and novel means to reduce the burden of the tuberculosis problem that at the moment seems to be getting out of control in sub-Saharan Africa. This information would also be of great relevance in the design of vaccines against diseases of major public health importance, including malaria and HIV/AIDS.",
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Helminthes could influence the outcome of vaccines against TB in the tropics. / Elias, D; Akuffo, H; Britton, S.

I: Parasite Immunology, Bind 28, Nr. 10, 10.2006, s. 507-13.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Akuffo, H

AU - Britton, S

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N2 - Helminthes, infections widespread in the tropics, are known to elicit a wide range of immunomodulation characterized by dominant Th2 type immune responses, chronic immune activation as well as up-regulated regulatory T cell activity. Such a wide range of immunomodulation caused by helminthes may have an impact on the host's ability to cope with subsequent infections and/or may affect the efficacy of vaccination. Indeed studies conducted in humans living in helminth-endemic areas and in animal models showed that helminth infection makes the host more permissive to mycobacterial infections and less able to benefit from vaccination. These observations have fundamental practical consequences if confirmed by large and appropriately controlled clinical studies. Eradication of worms could offer an affordable, simple and novel means to reduce the burden of the tuberculosis problem that at the moment seems to be getting out of control in sub-Saharan Africa. This information would also be of great relevance in the design of vaccines against diseases of major public health importance, including malaria and HIV/AIDS.

AB - Helminthes, infections widespread in the tropics, are known to elicit a wide range of immunomodulation characterized by dominant Th2 type immune responses, chronic immune activation as well as up-regulated regulatory T cell activity. Such a wide range of immunomodulation caused by helminthes may have an impact on the host's ability to cope with subsequent infections and/or may affect the efficacy of vaccination. Indeed studies conducted in humans living in helminth-endemic areas and in animal models showed that helminth infection makes the host more permissive to mycobacterial infections and less able to benefit from vaccination. These observations have fundamental practical consequences if confirmed by large and appropriately controlled clinical studies. Eradication of worms could offer an affordable, simple and novel means to reduce the burden of the tuberculosis problem that at the moment seems to be getting out of control in sub-Saharan Africa. This information would also be of great relevance in the design of vaccines against diseases of major public health importance, including malaria and HIV/AIDS.

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