Hair cortisol in the perinatal period mediates associations between maternal adversity and disrupted maternal interaction in early infancy

Maja Nyström-Hansen*, Marianne S. Andersen, Jennifer E. Khoury, Kirstine Davidsen, Andrew Gumley, Karlen Lyons-Ruth, Angus MacBeth, Susanne Harder

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Existing literature points to the possibility that cortisol could be one link between maternal adversity and poorer parenting quality, but most studies have examined salivary cortisol concentrations rather than hair cortisol concentrations. The current study examined hair cortisol concentration (HCC) during the third trimester of pregnancy as a mediator between maternal adversity indicators (childhood abuse, severe mental illness, symptomatic functioning) and maternal caregiving behavior at 4 months postpartum. Forty-four women participated in the study: 30 with severe mental disorders, and 14 nonclinical controls. HCC was assessed during the third trimester of pregnancy (HCC-P) and at 4 months postpartum (HCC-4M). Sexual, physical, and emotional abuse were assessed by the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study Questionnaire. Maternal disrupted interaction was reliably coded from mother–infant video interactions during a Still-Face Procedure. Mediation models indicated that maternal HCC-P and HCC-4M mediated associations between maternal psychopathology (severe mental illness, symptomatic functioning) and maternal disrupted interaction at 4 months. Maternal HCC at 4 months also mediated associations between experienced childhood abuse and overall disrupted interaction. Our findings indicate that HCC may be a potential early biomarker for future caregiving challenges among mothers with severe mental illness and histories of childhood abuse.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDevelopmental Psychobiology
Vol/bind61
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)543-556
ISSN0012-1630
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. maj 2019

Fingeraftryk

Hair
Mothers
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Maternal Behavior
Parenting
Psychopathology

Citer dette

Nyström-Hansen, Maja ; Andersen, Marianne S. ; Khoury, Jennifer E. ; Davidsen, Kirstine ; Gumley, Andrew ; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen ; MacBeth, Angus ; Harder, Susanne. / Hair cortisol in the perinatal period mediates associations between maternal adversity and disrupted maternal interaction in early infancy. I: Developmental Psychobiology. 2019 ; Bind 61, Nr. 4. s. 543-556.
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title = "Hair cortisol in the perinatal period mediates associations between maternal adversity and disrupted maternal interaction in early infancy",
abstract = "Existing literature points to the possibility that cortisol could be one link between maternal adversity and poorer parenting quality, but most studies have examined salivary cortisol concentrations rather than hair cortisol concentrations. The current study examined hair cortisol concentration (HCC) during the third trimester of pregnancy as a mediator between maternal adversity indicators (childhood abuse, severe mental illness, symptomatic functioning) and maternal caregiving behavior at 4 months postpartum. Forty-four women participated in the study: 30 with severe mental disorders, and 14 nonclinical controls. HCC was assessed during the third trimester of pregnancy (HCC-P) and at 4 months postpartum (HCC-4M). Sexual, physical, and emotional abuse were assessed by the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study Questionnaire. Maternal disrupted interaction was reliably coded from mother–infant video interactions during a Still-Face Procedure. Mediation models indicated that maternal HCC-P and HCC-4M mediated associations between maternal psychopathology (severe mental illness, symptomatic functioning) and maternal disrupted interaction at 4 months. Maternal HCC at 4 months also mediated associations between experienced childhood abuse and overall disrupted interaction. Our findings indicate that HCC may be a potential early biomarker for future caregiving challenges among mothers with severe mental illness and histories of childhood abuse.",
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author = "Maja Nystr{\"o}m-Hansen and Andersen, {Marianne S.} and Khoury, {Jennifer E.} and Kirstine Davidsen and Andrew Gumley and Karlen Lyons-Ruth and Angus MacBeth and Susanne Harder",
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Hair cortisol in the perinatal period mediates associations between maternal adversity and disrupted maternal interaction in early infancy. / Nyström-Hansen, Maja; Andersen, Marianne S.; Khoury, Jennifer E.; Davidsen, Kirstine; Gumley, Andrew; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen; MacBeth, Angus; Harder, Susanne.

I: Developmental Psychobiology, Bind 61, Nr. 4, 01.05.2019, s. 543-556.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hair cortisol in the perinatal period mediates associations between maternal adversity and disrupted maternal interaction in early infancy

AU - Nyström-Hansen, Maja

AU - Andersen, Marianne S.

AU - Khoury, Jennifer E.

AU - Davidsen, Kirstine

AU - Gumley, Andrew

AU - Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

AU - MacBeth, Angus

AU - Harder, Susanne

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Existing literature points to the possibility that cortisol could be one link between maternal adversity and poorer parenting quality, but most studies have examined salivary cortisol concentrations rather than hair cortisol concentrations. The current study examined hair cortisol concentration (HCC) during the third trimester of pregnancy as a mediator between maternal adversity indicators (childhood abuse, severe mental illness, symptomatic functioning) and maternal caregiving behavior at 4 months postpartum. Forty-four women participated in the study: 30 with severe mental disorders, and 14 nonclinical controls. HCC was assessed during the third trimester of pregnancy (HCC-P) and at 4 months postpartum (HCC-4M). Sexual, physical, and emotional abuse were assessed by the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study Questionnaire. Maternal disrupted interaction was reliably coded from mother–infant video interactions during a Still-Face Procedure. Mediation models indicated that maternal HCC-P and HCC-4M mediated associations between maternal psychopathology (severe mental illness, symptomatic functioning) and maternal disrupted interaction at 4 months. Maternal HCC at 4 months also mediated associations between experienced childhood abuse and overall disrupted interaction. Our findings indicate that HCC may be a potential early biomarker for future caregiving challenges among mothers with severe mental illness and histories of childhood abuse.

AB - Existing literature points to the possibility that cortisol could be one link between maternal adversity and poorer parenting quality, but most studies have examined salivary cortisol concentrations rather than hair cortisol concentrations. The current study examined hair cortisol concentration (HCC) during the third trimester of pregnancy as a mediator between maternal adversity indicators (childhood abuse, severe mental illness, symptomatic functioning) and maternal caregiving behavior at 4 months postpartum. Forty-four women participated in the study: 30 with severe mental disorders, and 14 nonclinical controls. HCC was assessed during the third trimester of pregnancy (HCC-P) and at 4 months postpartum (HCC-4M). Sexual, physical, and emotional abuse were assessed by the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study Questionnaire. Maternal disrupted interaction was reliably coded from mother–infant video interactions during a Still-Face Procedure. Mediation models indicated that maternal HCC-P and HCC-4M mediated associations between maternal psychopathology (severe mental illness, symptomatic functioning) and maternal disrupted interaction at 4 months. Maternal HCC at 4 months also mediated associations between experienced childhood abuse and overall disrupted interaction. Our findings indicate that HCC may be a potential early biomarker for future caregiving challenges among mothers with severe mental illness and histories of childhood abuse.

KW - disrupted maternal behavior

KW - hair cortisol

KW - maternal childhood abuse

KW - perinatal period

KW - severe mental illness

U2 - 10.1002/dev.21833

DO - 10.1002/dev.21833

M3 - Journal article

VL - 61

SP - 543

EP - 556

JO - Developmental Psychobiology

JF - Developmental Psychobiology

SN - 0012-1630

IS - 4

ER -