Giving Children a Voice: Exploring What Quantitative Studies Can’t Tell Us About Recess Physical Activity

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

Resumé

Facilitators and barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. To date, research on recess physical activity has predominantly focused on quantitative measures typically focusing on a narrow set of predefined factors, often constructed by adults. To really understand the factors affecting recess physical activity it is crucial to observe and listen to children to know how they engage in and perceive recess physical activity. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge on children’s perceptions and experiences of factors influencing their physical activity behaviour during recess. The findings were used in the developing phase of The Activating Schoolyards Study, an intervention study aiming to increase children’s recess physical activity.
Data were collected in two studies using a combination of participatory approaches; participant observation, go-along group interview and participatory photo interview. The studies were conducted among 10-13 year-old children (grade 4-6) in the 17 Danish schools included in The Activating Schoolyards Study, and in five New Zealand schools. The socio-ecological model was used as the overall theoretical framework.
Twelve factors were identified to influence the children’s recess physical activity: bodily self-esteem and ability, gender, gendered school culture, peer influence, conflicts and exclusion, space and place experiences, lack of play facilities, outdoor play policy, use of electronic devices, recess duration, organised activities, and weather. These factors were located within different layers of the socio-ecological model, but were interdependent.
The participatory approaches were valuable to capture knowledge on the children’s perceptions and experiences of factors influencing their physical activity behaviour during recess. The findings speak for implementing a combination of actions addressing factors from different layers in the socio-ecological model to increase recess physical activity. For example, by designing schoolyards with smaller secluded spaces, combined with regulating the use of electronic devices during recess, or organising teacher-controlled recess activities.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato17. nov. 2016
StatusUdgivet - 17. nov. 2016
Begivenhed6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health: Active Living for All: Active People, Active Place, Active Policy - Bangkok, Thailand
Varighed: 16. nov. 201619. nov. 2016
Konferencens nummer: 6

Konference

Konference6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health
Nummer6
LandThailand
ByBangkok
Periode16/11/201619/11/2016

Fingeraftryk

electronics
experience
school culture
interview
know how
participant observation
school
self-esteem
New Zealand
exclusion
school grade
lack
gender
ability
teacher
Group

Citer dette

Pawlowski, C. S., Schipperijn, J., Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, T., & Troelsen, J. (2016). Giving Children a Voice: Exploring What Quantitative Studies Can’t Tell Us About Recess Physical Activity. Poster session præsenteret på 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, Bangkok, Thailand.
@conference{08446b2660294b9fa10cef1462361152,
title = "Giving Children a Voice: Exploring What Quantitative Studies Can’t Tell Us About Recess Physical Activity",
abstract = "Facilitators and barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. To date, research on recess physical activity has predominantly focused on quantitative measures typically focusing on a narrow set of predefined factors, often constructed by adults. To really understand the factors affecting recess physical activity it is crucial to observe and listen to children to know how they engage in and perceive recess physical activity. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge on children’s perceptions and experiences of factors influencing their physical activity behaviour during recess. The findings were used in the developing phase of The Activating Schoolyards Study, an intervention study aiming to increase children’s recess physical activity. Data were collected in two studies using a combination of participatory approaches; participant observation, go-along group interview and participatory photo interview. The studies were conducted among 10-13 year-old children (grade 4-6) in the 17 Danish schools included in The Activating Schoolyards Study, and in five New Zealand schools. The socio-ecological model was used as the overall theoretical framework.Twelve factors were identified to influence the children’s recess physical activity: bodily self-esteem and ability, gender, gendered school culture, peer influence, conflicts and exclusion, space and place experiences, lack of play facilities, outdoor play policy, use of electronic devices, recess duration, organised activities, and weather. These factors were located within different layers of the socio-ecological model, but were interdependent. The participatory approaches were valuable to capture knowledge on the children’s perceptions and experiences of factors influencing their physical activity behaviour during recess. The findings speak for implementing a combination of actions addressing factors from different layers in the socio-ecological model to increase recess physical activity. For example, by designing schoolyards with smaller secluded spaces, combined with regulating the use of electronic devices during recess, or organising teacher-controlled recess activities.",
author = "Pawlowski, {Charlotte Skau} and Jasper Schipperijn and Tine Tj{\o}rnh{\o}j-Thomsen and Jens Troelsen",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "17",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 16-11-2016 Through 19-11-2016",

}

Pawlowski, CS, Schipperijn, J, Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, T & Troelsen, J 2016, 'Giving Children a Voice: Exploring What Quantitative Studies Can’t Tell Us About Recess Physical Activity' 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, Bangkok, Thailand, 16/11/2016 - 19/11/2016, .

Giving Children a Voice: Exploring What Quantitative Studies Can’t Tell Us About Recess Physical Activity. / Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Schipperijn, Jasper; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Troelsen, Jens.

2016. Poster session præsenteret på 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, Bangkok, Thailand.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

TY - CONF

T1 - Giving Children a Voice: Exploring What Quantitative Studies Can’t Tell Us About Recess Physical Activity

AU - Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau

AU - Schipperijn, Jasper

AU - Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

AU - Troelsen, Jens

PY - 2016/11/17

Y1 - 2016/11/17

N2 - Facilitators and barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. To date, research on recess physical activity has predominantly focused on quantitative measures typically focusing on a narrow set of predefined factors, often constructed by adults. To really understand the factors affecting recess physical activity it is crucial to observe and listen to children to know how they engage in and perceive recess physical activity. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge on children’s perceptions and experiences of factors influencing their physical activity behaviour during recess. The findings were used in the developing phase of The Activating Schoolyards Study, an intervention study aiming to increase children’s recess physical activity. Data were collected in two studies using a combination of participatory approaches; participant observation, go-along group interview and participatory photo interview. The studies were conducted among 10-13 year-old children (grade 4-6) in the 17 Danish schools included in The Activating Schoolyards Study, and in five New Zealand schools. The socio-ecological model was used as the overall theoretical framework.Twelve factors were identified to influence the children’s recess physical activity: bodily self-esteem and ability, gender, gendered school culture, peer influence, conflicts and exclusion, space and place experiences, lack of play facilities, outdoor play policy, use of electronic devices, recess duration, organised activities, and weather. These factors were located within different layers of the socio-ecological model, but were interdependent. The participatory approaches were valuable to capture knowledge on the children’s perceptions and experiences of factors influencing their physical activity behaviour during recess. The findings speak for implementing a combination of actions addressing factors from different layers in the socio-ecological model to increase recess physical activity. For example, by designing schoolyards with smaller secluded spaces, combined with regulating the use of electronic devices during recess, or organising teacher-controlled recess activities.

AB - Facilitators and barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. To date, research on recess physical activity has predominantly focused on quantitative measures typically focusing on a narrow set of predefined factors, often constructed by adults. To really understand the factors affecting recess physical activity it is crucial to observe and listen to children to know how they engage in and perceive recess physical activity. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge on children’s perceptions and experiences of factors influencing their physical activity behaviour during recess. The findings were used in the developing phase of The Activating Schoolyards Study, an intervention study aiming to increase children’s recess physical activity. Data were collected in two studies using a combination of participatory approaches; participant observation, go-along group interview and participatory photo interview. The studies were conducted among 10-13 year-old children (grade 4-6) in the 17 Danish schools included in The Activating Schoolyards Study, and in five New Zealand schools. The socio-ecological model was used as the overall theoretical framework.Twelve factors were identified to influence the children’s recess physical activity: bodily self-esteem and ability, gender, gendered school culture, peer influence, conflicts and exclusion, space and place experiences, lack of play facilities, outdoor play policy, use of electronic devices, recess duration, organised activities, and weather. These factors were located within different layers of the socio-ecological model, but were interdependent. The participatory approaches were valuable to capture knowledge on the children’s perceptions and experiences of factors influencing their physical activity behaviour during recess. The findings speak for implementing a combination of actions addressing factors from different layers in the socio-ecological model to increase recess physical activity. For example, by designing schoolyards with smaller secluded spaces, combined with regulating the use of electronic devices during recess, or organising teacher-controlled recess activities.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Pawlowski CS, Schipperijn J, Tjørnhøj-Thomsen T, Troelsen J. Giving Children a Voice: Exploring What Quantitative Studies Can’t Tell Us About Recess Physical Activity. 2016. Poster session præsenteret på 6th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, Bangkok, Thailand.