Genetic Influence on the Peripheral Blood CD4+ T-cell Differentiation Status in CMV Infection

David Goldeck, Lisbeth Aagaard Larsen, Lene Christiansen, Kaare Christensen, Klaus Hamprecht, Graham Pawelec, Evelyna Derhovanessian

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Resumé

A latent infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ubiquitous beta herpesvirus, is associated with an accumulation of late-differentiated memory T-cells, often accompanied by a reciprocal reduced frequency of early-differentiated cells (commonly also referred to as "naïve"). However, this impact of CMV on T-cell phenotypes is variable between individuals. Our previous findings in a subgroup of participants in the Leiden familial Longevity Study indicated an important role of genetics. For further testing, we have analyzed middle-aged monozygotic (MZ, n = 42) and dizygotic (DZ, n = 39) twin pairs from the Danish Twin Registry for their T-cell differentiation status, assessed by surface expression of CD27, CD28, CD57, and KLRG-1. We observed a significant intraclass correlation between cotwins of MZ, but not DZ pairs for the differentiation status of CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. Classical heritability analysis confirmed a substantial contribution of genetics to the differentiation status of T-cells in CMV infection. The humoral (IgG) response to different CMV antigens also seems to be genetically influenced, suggesting that a similar degree of immune control of the virus in MZ twins might be responsible for their similar T-cell differentiation status. Thus, the way T-cells differentiate in the face of a latent CMV infection, and the parallel humoral responses, both controlling the virus, are genetically influenced.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences
Vol/bind71
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)1537-1543
ISSN1079-5006
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2016

Fingeraftryk

Cytomegalovirus Infections
Cell Differentiation
Cytomegalovirus
Viruses
Herpesviridae
Registries

Emneord

  • Genetics
  • Heritability
  • Humoral responses
  • Twins

Citer dette

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Genetic Influence on the Peripheral Blood CD4+ T-cell Differentiation Status in CMV Infection. / Goldeck, David; Larsen, Lisbeth Aagaard; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Hamprecht, Klaus; Pawelec, Graham; Derhovanessian, Evelyna.

I: Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences, Bind 71, Nr. 12, 2016, s. 1537-1543.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic Influence on the Peripheral Blood CD4+ T-cell Differentiation Status in CMV Infection

AU - Goldeck, David

AU - Larsen, Lisbeth Aagaard

AU - Christiansen, Lene

AU - Christensen, Kaare

AU - Hamprecht, Klaus

AU - Pawelec, Graham

AU - Derhovanessian, Evelyna

N1 - © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - A latent infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ubiquitous beta herpesvirus, is associated with an accumulation of late-differentiated memory T-cells, often accompanied by a reciprocal reduced frequency of early-differentiated cells (commonly also referred to as "naïve"). However, this impact of CMV on T-cell phenotypes is variable between individuals. Our previous findings in a subgroup of participants in the Leiden familial Longevity Study indicated an important role of genetics. For further testing, we have analyzed middle-aged monozygotic (MZ, n = 42) and dizygotic (DZ, n = 39) twin pairs from the Danish Twin Registry for their T-cell differentiation status, assessed by surface expression of CD27, CD28, CD57, and KLRG-1. We observed a significant intraclass correlation between cotwins of MZ, but not DZ pairs for the differentiation status of CD4(+) and CD8(+) subsets. Classical heritability analysis confirmed a substantial contribution of genetics to the differentiation status of T-cells in CMV infection. The humoral (IgG) response to different CMV antigens also seems to be genetically influenced, suggesting that a similar degree of immune control of the virus in MZ twins might be responsible for their similar T-cell differentiation status. Thus, the way T-cells differentiate in the face of a latent CMV infection, and the parallel humoral responses, both controlling the virus, are genetically influenced.

AB - A latent infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ubiquitous beta herpesvirus, is associated with an accumulation of late-differentiated memory T-cells, often accompanied by a reciprocal reduced frequency of early-differentiated cells (commonly also referred to as "naïve"). However, this impact of CMV on T-cell phenotypes is variable between individuals. Our previous findings in a subgroup of participants in the Leiden familial Longevity Study indicated an important role of genetics. For further testing, we have analyzed middle-aged monozygotic (MZ, n = 42) and dizygotic (DZ, n = 39) twin pairs from the Danish Twin Registry for their T-cell differentiation status, assessed by surface expression of CD27, CD28, CD57, and KLRG-1. We observed a significant intraclass correlation between cotwins of MZ, but not DZ pairs for the differentiation status of CD4(+) and CD8(+) subsets. Classical heritability analysis confirmed a substantial contribution of genetics to the differentiation status of T-cells in CMV infection. The humoral (IgG) response to different CMV antigens also seems to be genetically influenced, suggesting that a similar degree of immune control of the virus in MZ twins might be responsible for their similar T-cell differentiation status. Thus, the way T-cells differentiate in the face of a latent CMV infection, and the parallel humoral responses, both controlling the virus, are genetically influenced.

KW - Genetics

KW - Heritability

KW - Humoral responses

KW - Twins

KW - Genetics

KW - Heritability

KW - Humoral responses

KW - Twins

U2 - 10.1093/gerona/glv230

DO - 10.1093/gerona/glv230

M3 - Journal article

VL - 71

SP - 1537

EP - 1543

JO - Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

IS - 12

ER -