Genetic and environmental contributions to hay fever among young adult twins

Simon Francis Thomsen, Charlotte Suppli Ulrik, Kirsten Ohm Kyvik, Jacob v. B. Hjelmborg, Lars Rauff Skadhauge, Ida Steffensen, Vibeke Backer

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: Dec
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftRespiratory Medicine
Vol/bind100
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)2177-2182
ISSN0954-6111
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2006

Fingeraftryk

Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
Young Adult
Dizygotic Twins
Monozygotic Twins
Genetic Models
Registries

Citer dette

Thomsen, Simon Francis ; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte ; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm ; Hjelmborg, Jacob v. B. ; Rauff Skadhauge, Lars ; Steffensen, Ida ; Backer, Vibeke. / Genetic and environmental contributions to hay fever among young adult twins. I: Respiratory Medicine. 2006 ; Bind 100, Nr. 12. s. 2177-2182.
@article{346ff890d16f11dbbc51000ea68e967b,
title = "Genetic and environmental contributions to hay fever among young adult twins",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The susceptibility to develop hay fever is putatively the result both of genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the significance and magnitude of genetic and environmental contributions to hay fever among young adult twins. METHODS: From the birth cohorts 1953-82 of The Danish Twin Registry 11,750 twin pairs were identified through a nationwide questionnaire survey. Subjects were regarded hay fever cases when responding affirmatively to the question 'Do you have, or have you ever had hay fever?' Latent factor models of genetic and environmental effects were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. RESULTS: The overall cumulative prevalence of hay fever was 12.6{\%}. Identical twins were significantly more likely to be concordant for hay fever than were fraternal twins (P<0.001). Additive genetic effects accounted for 71{\%} and non-shared environmental effects accounted for 29{\%} of the individual susceptibility to hay fever. The same genes contributed to the susceptibility to hay fever both in males and in females. In families with asthma, the susceptibility to develop hay fever was, in addition to genes, to a great extent ascribable to family environment, whereas the aetiology of 'sporadic' hay fever was mainly genetic. CONCLUSIONS: The susceptibility to develop hay fever is attributable to major genetic influences. However, effects of family environment and upbringing are also of importance in families where asthma is present. These results indicate that different sub-forms of hay fever may have different aetiologies.",
author = "Thomsen, {Simon Francis} and {Suppli Ulrik}, Charlotte and Kyvik, {Kirsten Ohm} and Hjelmborg, {Jacob v. B.} and {Rauff Skadhauge}, Lars and Ida Steffensen and Vibeke Backer",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1016/j.rmed.2006.03.013",
language = "English",
volume = "100",
pages = "2177--2182",
journal = "Respiratory Medicine",
issn = "0954-6111",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "12",

}

Genetic and environmental contributions to hay fever among young adult twins. / Thomsen, Simon Francis; Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Hjelmborg, Jacob v. B.; Rauff Skadhauge, Lars; Steffensen, Ida; Backer, Vibeke.

I: Respiratory Medicine, Bind 100, Nr. 12, 2006, s. 2177-2182.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic and environmental contributions to hay fever among young adult twins

AU - Thomsen, Simon Francis

AU - Suppli Ulrik, Charlotte

AU - Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

AU - Hjelmborg, Jacob v. B.

AU - Rauff Skadhauge, Lars

AU - Steffensen, Ida

AU - Backer, Vibeke

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - BACKGROUND: The susceptibility to develop hay fever is putatively the result both of genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the significance and magnitude of genetic and environmental contributions to hay fever among young adult twins. METHODS: From the birth cohorts 1953-82 of The Danish Twin Registry 11,750 twin pairs were identified through a nationwide questionnaire survey. Subjects were regarded hay fever cases when responding affirmatively to the question 'Do you have, or have you ever had hay fever?' Latent factor models of genetic and environmental effects were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. RESULTS: The overall cumulative prevalence of hay fever was 12.6%. Identical twins were significantly more likely to be concordant for hay fever than were fraternal twins (P<0.001). Additive genetic effects accounted for 71% and non-shared environmental effects accounted for 29% of the individual susceptibility to hay fever. The same genes contributed to the susceptibility to hay fever both in males and in females. In families with asthma, the susceptibility to develop hay fever was, in addition to genes, to a great extent ascribable to family environment, whereas the aetiology of 'sporadic' hay fever was mainly genetic. CONCLUSIONS: The susceptibility to develop hay fever is attributable to major genetic influences. However, effects of family environment and upbringing are also of importance in families where asthma is present. These results indicate that different sub-forms of hay fever may have different aetiologies.

AB - BACKGROUND: The susceptibility to develop hay fever is putatively the result both of genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the significance and magnitude of genetic and environmental contributions to hay fever among young adult twins. METHODS: From the birth cohorts 1953-82 of The Danish Twin Registry 11,750 twin pairs were identified through a nationwide questionnaire survey. Subjects were regarded hay fever cases when responding affirmatively to the question 'Do you have, or have you ever had hay fever?' Latent factor models of genetic and environmental effects were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. RESULTS: The overall cumulative prevalence of hay fever was 12.6%. Identical twins were significantly more likely to be concordant for hay fever than were fraternal twins (P<0.001). Additive genetic effects accounted for 71% and non-shared environmental effects accounted for 29% of the individual susceptibility to hay fever. The same genes contributed to the susceptibility to hay fever both in males and in females. In families with asthma, the susceptibility to develop hay fever was, in addition to genes, to a great extent ascribable to family environment, whereas the aetiology of 'sporadic' hay fever was mainly genetic. CONCLUSIONS: The susceptibility to develop hay fever is attributable to major genetic influences. However, effects of family environment and upbringing are also of importance in families where asthma is present. These results indicate that different sub-forms of hay fever may have different aetiologies.

U2 - 10.1016/j.rmed.2006.03.013

DO - 10.1016/j.rmed.2006.03.013

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 16650971

VL - 100

SP - 2177

EP - 2182

JO - Respiratory Medicine

JF - Respiratory Medicine

SN - 0954-6111

IS - 12

ER -