Gender but not diabetes, hypertension or smoking affects infarct evolution in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients - Data from the CHILL-MI, MITOCARE and SOCCER trials

David Nordlund, Henrik Engblom, Jean Louis Bonnet, Henrik Steen Hansen, Dan Atar, David Erlinge, Ulf Ekelund, Einar Heiberg, Marcus Carlsson, Håkan Arheden*

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Abstrakt

Background: Infarct evolution rate and response to acute reperfusion therapy may differ between patients, which is important to consider for accurate management and treatment of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the association of infarct size and myocardial salvage with gender, smoking status, presence of diabetes or history of hypertension in a cohort of STEMI-patients. Methods: Patients (n = 301) with first-time STEMI from the three recent multi-center trials (CHILL-MI, MITOCARE and SOCCER) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging to determine myocardium at risk (MaR) and infarct size (IS). Myocardial salvage index (MSI) was calculated as MSI = 1-IS/MaR. Pain to balloon time, culprit vessel, trial treatments, age, TIMI grade flow and collateral flow by Rentrop grading were included as explanatory variables in the statistical model. Results: Women (n = 66) had significantly smaller MaR (mean difference: 5.0 ± 1.5% of left ventricle (LV), p < 0.01), smaller IS (mean difference: 5.1 ± 1.4% of LV, p = 0.03), and larger MSI (mean difference: 9.6 ± 2.8% of LV, p < 0.01) compared to men (n = 238). These differences remained significant when adjusting for other explanatory variables. There were no significant effects on MaR, IS or MSI for diabetes, hypertension or smoking. Conclusions: Female gender is associated with higher myocardial salvage and smaller infarct size suggesting a pathophysiological difference in infarct evolution between men and women.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer161
TidsskriftBMC Cardiovascular Disorders
Vol/bind19
Udgave nummer1
Antal sider10
ISSN1471-2261
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 3. jul. 2019

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