Free-field binaural unmasking in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus)

Micheal L. Dent, Ole N. Larsen, Robert J. Dooling*

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Resumé

The detection of signals in noise is important for understanding both the mechanisms of hearing and how the auditory system functions under more natural conditions. In humans, the auditory system gains some improvement if the signal and noise are separated in space (binaural masking release). Birds with small heads are at a disadvantage in separating noise and signal sources relative to large mammals, because interaural time differences are much smaller. Two binaural phenomena in budgerigars related to the detection of tones in noise were examined. Budgerigars show 8 dB of free-field binaural masking release when signal and noise are presented to their right side and correlated noise is presented to their left side. Budgerigars also show a spatial masking release of 9 dB when a signal and noise are separated in azimuth by 90°. These results are similar to those found in humans and other mammals with much larger heads.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBehavioral Neuroscience
Vol/bind111
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)590-598
Antal sider9
ISSN0735-7044
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. jun. 1997

Fingeraftryk

Melopsittacus
Noise
Mammals
Hearing

Citer dette

Dent, Micheal L. ; Larsen, Ole N. ; Dooling, Robert J. / Free-field binaural unmasking in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus). I: Behavioral Neuroscience. 1997 ; Bind 111, Nr. 3. s. 590-598.
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Free-field binaural unmasking in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus). / Dent, Micheal L.; Larsen, Ole N.; Dooling, Robert J.

I: Behavioral Neuroscience, Bind 111, Nr. 3, 01.06.1997, s. 590-598.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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