Fish and salad consumption are inversely associated with levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in a Danish adult cohort

Peter Møller*, Annie Jensen, Mille Løhr, Louise Eriksen, Morten Grønbæk, Steffen Loft

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This study investigated associations between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, measured by the formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-modified comet assay and intake of fish, salad, fruits, vegetables, wholegrain items, and potatoes in a cross-sectional study of 382 men and 591 women between 18 and 93 years. Intake of dietary items was obtained from questionnaires, and stratified into less than once per week, weekly or daily consumption. Intake of fish as main course was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in especially women (P < 0.001 multivariate linear regression). Intake of fish was also inversely associated with lower levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in men (P < 0.05, univariate analysis), although it was not statistically significant in analysis adjusted for lifestyle and other dietary factors. Intake of salad was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in men (P < 0.001, multivariate linear regression). Statistically significant associations were also observed for intake of vegetables and potatoes in men, although these were weak and not robust in all statistical models. The sum the six individual dietary items was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in the strata of men (P < 0.001, multivariate linear regression). Finally, levels of DNA repair incision activity were not associated with individual food categories or the total dietary food score. In summary, consumption of health-promoting foods is associated with lower levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in human PBMCs and strongest effects in the present population were ingestions of fish and salad.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftMutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis
Vol/bind843
Sider (fra-til)66-72
ISSN1383-5718
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. jul. 2019

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