Female Agency in the Urban Economy

Gender in Europan Towns, 1640-1830

Publikation: Bog/antologi/afhandling/rapportAntologiForskningpeer review

Resumé

The three hundred year period between 1650 and 1950 traces the emergence, diversification and developing hegemony of the town in the history of Europe. As places which fostered and disseminated key social, economic, political and cultural developments, towns were central to the creation of gendered identities and the transmission of ideas across local, national and transnational boundaries. This book is the first publication from a pan-European network of established and postgraduate historians from twelve countries whose interests lie in examining the ways that the European urban experience was gendered over time and across borders. Their research and subsequent publications will revolve around the operation of gender in three distinct, but interrelated, areas of urban study: the economic, the political and the spatial. The three central themes speak directly to newer ideas of exploring the dynamics of culture – both as definition and as practice. The urban dimension reveals much about how socio-political shifts took place.
This book proposes to examine the first of these themes. Situated in eighteenth-century urban culture, it explores the activities and agency of women in these commercial communities. Towns were often the motivators for economic change, controlling trade and capital formation, and the disseminators of culture. Urban economic culture is embedded in the meanings attributed to expertise, skill and ‘brotherhood’. However, during the eighteenth century, commercial and capitalist culture increasing broke down some of the corporate protection that men had felt, replacing it with individual identity, class and status. In this context, masculinity and femininity became areas for dispute and renegotiation. Gender tensions, over trade and political rights, for example, influenced the formal and informal economy and polity. Women were often the majority in towns, which had particular implications for how they inserted themselves in and contributed to shaping the identity of towns. Thus this book will address a number of questions which speak to how women specifically negotiated and articulated their relationship to the gendered urban economy.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Udgivelses stedNew York
ForlagRoutledge
Antal sider271
ISBN (Trykt)978-0-415-53729-2
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2013
NavnRoutledge Research in Gender and History

Fingeraftryk

Economy
Economics
Historian
Brotherhood
Diversification
Urban Studies
Urban Culture
Political Rights
History
Economic Change
Informal Economy
Cultural Development
Hegemony
Expertise
Femininity
Dispute
Masculinity
Polity

Citer dette

Simonton, Deborah Leigh. / Female Agency in the Urban Economy : Gender in Europan Towns, 1640-1830. New York : Routledge, 2013. 271 s. (Routledge Research in Gender and History).
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Female Agency in the Urban Economy : Gender in Europan Towns, 1640-1830. / Simonton, Deborah Leigh.

New York : Routledge, 2013. 271 s. (Routledge Research in Gender and History).

Publikation: Bog/antologi/afhandling/rapportAntologiForskningpeer review

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Simonton DL. Female Agency in the Urban Economy: Gender in Europan Towns, 1640-1830. New York: Routledge, 2013. 271 s. (Routledge Research in Gender and History). https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203110522