Fecundity, fertility and the formation of human capital

Marc Klemp*, Jacob Weisdorf

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Resumé

Exploiting a genealogy of English individuals living in the 16th to the 19th centuries, this study shows that lower parental reproductive capacity positively affected the socio-economic achievements of offspring. Using the time interval between the date of marriage and the first birth as a measure of reproductive capacity, we find that parental fecundity positively affected the number of siblings and that children of parents with lower fecundity were more likely to become literate and employed in skilled and high-income professions. This suggests there was a trade-off between child quantity and quality in England during the industrial revolution, supporting leading theories of the origins of modern economic growth.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEconomic Journal
Vol/bind129
Udgave nummer618
Sider (fra-til)925-960
ISSN0013-0133
DOI
StatusUdgivet - feb. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Human capital
Fertility
Industrial revolution
Siblings
Income
Marriage
Economic growth
Genealogy
Trade-offs
Socio-economics
England

Citer dette

Klemp, Marc ; Weisdorf, Jacob. / Fecundity, fertility and the formation of human capital. I: Economic Journal. 2019 ; Bind 129, Nr. 618. s. 925-960.
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Fecundity, fertility and the formation of human capital. / Klemp, Marc; Weisdorf, Jacob.

I: Economic Journal, Bind 129, Nr. 618, 02.2019, s. 925-960.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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T1 - Fecundity, fertility and the formation of human capital

AU - Klemp, Marc

AU - Weisdorf, Jacob

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