Fast-food intake and perceived and objective measures of the local fast-food environment in adolescents

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Resumé

OBJECTIVE: We examined associations between fast-food intake and perceived and objective fast-food outlet exposure.

DESIGN: Information from the Health Behaviours in School-aged Children Study was linked to fast-food outlets in seventy-five school neighbourhoods. We used multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses to examine associations between at least weekly fast-food intake and perceived and objective fast-food outlet measures.

SUBJECTS: Data represent 4642 adolescents (aged 11-15 years) in Denmark.

RESULTS: Boys reporting two or more fast-food outlets had 34 % higher odds consuming fast food at least weekly. We detected higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake among 15-year-old 9th graders (ORall=1·74; 95 % CI 1·40, 2·18; ORboys=2·20; 95 % CI 1·66, 2·91; ORgirls=1·41; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·92), Danish speakers (ORall=2·32; 95 % CI 1·68, 3·19; ORboys=2·58; 95 % CI 1·69, 3·93; ORgirls=2·37; 95 % CI 1·46, 3·84) and those travelling 15 min or less to school (ORall=1·21; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·46; ORgirls=1·44; 95 % CI 1·08, 1·93) compared with 11-year-old 5th graders, non-Danish speakers and those with longer travel times. Boys from middle- (OR=1·28; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·65) and girls from low-income families (OR=1·46; 95 % CI 1·05, 2·04) had higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake compared with those from high-income backgrounds. Girls attending schools with canteens (OR=1·47; 95 % CI 1·00, 2·15) had higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake than girls at schools without canteens.

CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that perceived food outlets may impact fast-food intake in boys while proximity impacts intake in girls. Public health planning could target food environments that emphasize a better understanding of how adolescents use local resources.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPublic Health Nutrition
Vol/bind19
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)446-455
ISSN1368-9800
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2016

Fingeraftryk

Fast Foods
Food
Health Planning
Health Behavior
Denmark
Public Health
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Citer dette

@article{c35c10234daa4bf2adf5ba1d2552fe7d,
title = "Fast-food intake and perceived and objective measures of the local fast-food environment in adolescents",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: We examined associations between fast-food intake and perceived and objective fast-food outlet exposure.DESIGN: Information from the Health Behaviours in School-aged Children Study was linked to fast-food outlets in seventy-five school neighbourhoods. We used multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses to examine associations between at least weekly fast-food intake and perceived and objective fast-food outlet measures.SUBJECTS: Data represent 4642 adolescents (aged 11-15 years) in Denmark.RESULTS: Boys reporting two or more fast-food outlets had 34 {\%} higher odds consuming fast food at least weekly. We detected higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake among 15-year-old 9th graders (ORall=1·74; 95 {\%} CI 1·40, 2·18; ORboys=2·20; 95 {\%} CI 1·66, 2·91; ORgirls=1·41; 95 {\%} CI 1·03, 1·92), Danish speakers (ORall=2·32; 95 {\%} CI 1·68, 3·19; ORboys=2·58; 95 {\%} CI 1·69, 3·93; ORgirls=2·37; 95 {\%} CI 1·46, 3·84) and those travelling 15 min or less to school (ORall=1·21; 95 {\%} CI 1·00, 1·46; ORgirls=1·44; 95 {\%} CI 1·08, 1·93) compared with 11-year-old 5th graders, non-Danish speakers and those with longer travel times. Boys from middle- (OR=1·28; 95 {\%} CI 1·00, 1·65) and girls from low-income families (OR=1·46; 95 {\%} CI 1·05, 2·04) had higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake compared with those from high-income backgrounds. Girls attending schools with canteens (OR=1·47; 95 {\%} CI 1·00, 2·15) had higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake than girls at schools without canteens.CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that perceived food outlets may impact fast-food intake in boys while proximity impacts intake in girls. Public health planning could target food environments that emphasize a better understanding of how adolescents use local resources.",
author = "Chalida Svastisalee and {Pagh Pedersen}, Trine and Jasper Schipperijn and {Ellegaard J{\o}rgensen}, Sanne and Holstein, {Bj{\o}rn E} and Rikke Kr{\o}lner",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1017/S1368980015001366",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "446--455",
journal = "Public Health Nutrition",
issn = "1368-9800",
publisher = "Heinemann",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fast-food intake and perceived and objective measures of the local fast-food environment in adolescents

AU - Svastisalee, Chalida

AU - Pagh Pedersen, Trine

AU - Schipperijn, Jasper

AU - Ellegaard Jørgensen, Sanne

AU - Holstein, Bjørn E

AU - Krølner, Rikke

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - OBJECTIVE: We examined associations between fast-food intake and perceived and objective fast-food outlet exposure.DESIGN: Information from the Health Behaviours in School-aged Children Study was linked to fast-food outlets in seventy-five school neighbourhoods. We used multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses to examine associations between at least weekly fast-food intake and perceived and objective fast-food outlet measures.SUBJECTS: Data represent 4642 adolescents (aged 11-15 years) in Denmark.RESULTS: Boys reporting two or more fast-food outlets had 34 % higher odds consuming fast food at least weekly. We detected higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake among 15-year-old 9th graders (ORall=1·74; 95 % CI 1·40, 2·18; ORboys=2·20; 95 % CI 1·66, 2·91; ORgirls=1·41; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·92), Danish speakers (ORall=2·32; 95 % CI 1·68, 3·19; ORboys=2·58; 95 % CI 1·69, 3·93; ORgirls=2·37; 95 % CI 1·46, 3·84) and those travelling 15 min or less to school (ORall=1·21; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·46; ORgirls=1·44; 95 % CI 1·08, 1·93) compared with 11-year-old 5th graders, non-Danish speakers and those with longer travel times. Boys from middle- (OR=1·28; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·65) and girls from low-income families (OR=1·46; 95 % CI 1·05, 2·04) had higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake compared with those from high-income backgrounds. Girls attending schools with canteens (OR=1·47; 95 % CI 1·00, 2·15) had higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake than girls at schools without canteens.CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that perceived food outlets may impact fast-food intake in boys while proximity impacts intake in girls. Public health planning could target food environments that emphasize a better understanding of how adolescents use local resources.

AB - OBJECTIVE: We examined associations between fast-food intake and perceived and objective fast-food outlet exposure.DESIGN: Information from the Health Behaviours in School-aged Children Study was linked to fast-food outlets in seventy-five school neighbourhoods. We used multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses to examine associations between at least weekly fast-food intake and perceived and objective fast-food outlet measures.SUBJECTS: Data represent 4642 adolescents (aged 11-15 years) in Denmark.RESULTS: Boys reporting two or more fast-food outlets had 34 % higher odds consuming fast food at least weekly. We detected higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake among 15-year-old 9th graders (ORall=1·74; 95 % CI 1·40, 2·18; ORboys=2·20; 95 % CI 1·66, 2·91; ORgirls=1·41; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·92), Danish speakers (ORall=2·32; 95 % CI 1·68, 3·19; ORboys=2·58; 95 % CI 1·69, 3·93; ORgirls=2·37; 95 % CI 1·46, 3·84) and those travelling 15 min or less to school (ORall=1·21; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·46; ORgirls=1·44; 95 % CI 1·08, 1·93) compared with 11-year-old 5th graders, non-Danish speakers and those with longer travel times. Boys from middle- (OR=1·28; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·65) and girls from low-income families (OR=1·46; 95 % CI 1·05, 2·04) had higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake compared with those from high-income backgrounds. Girls attending schools with canteens (OR=1·47; 95 % CI 1·00, 2·15) had higher odds of at least weekly fast-food intake than girls at schools without canteens.CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that perceived food outlets may impact fast-food intake in boys while proximity impacts intake in girls. Public health planning could target food environments that emphasize a better understanding of how adolescents use local resources.

U2 - 10.1017/S1368980015001366

DO - 10.1017/S1368980015001366

M3 - Journal article

VL - 19

SP - 446

EP - 455

JO - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

SN - 1368-9800

IS - 3

ER -