Exposure of Inuit in Greenland to organochlorines through the marine diet

P Bjerregaard, E Dewailly, P Ayotte, T Pars, L Ferron, G Mulvad

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

High organochlorine concentrations have been found among the Inuit in eastern Canada and in Greenland. The present study was undertaken to assess the exposure to organochlorines in relation to age, sex, and diet in a general population sample of Inuit from Greenland. Survey data and plasma concentrations of 14 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and 16 pesticides, including 5 toxaphene congeners, were recorded in a random population survey of 408 adult indigenous Greenlanders. In a two-stage design, the survey response rate was 66%, and 90% of those randomly selected for blood testing participated. This was equivalent to an overall response rate of 59%. The median plasma concentration of the sum of PCB congeners was 13.3 microg/L; the lipid-adjusted value was 2109 microg/kg. The PCB concentration was twice as high as among the Inuit of Nunavik, Canada, 25 times higher than in a control group from southern Canada, and several times higher than the values found in European studies. Concentrations were similarly elevated for all PCB congeners and pesticides. The PCB congener pattern was similar to previous observations from the eastern Canadian Arctic and Greenland. Concentrations showed statistically significant positive associations with age, marine diet, and male sex in multiple linear regression analyses. The exceptionally high plasma concentrations of several organochlorines among the Inuit of Greenland are attributed to a lifelong high intake of seafood, in particular marine mammals. Concentrations of PCB adjusted for the consumption of marine food increased until approximately 40 yr of age, which is equivalent to the birth cohorts of the early 1950s. The age pattern indicates that bioaccumulation of PCB started in the 1950s, which is a likely date for the introduction of the compounds into the Arctic environment.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues
Vol/bind62
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)69-81
Antal sider13
ISSN1528-7394
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 26. jan. 2001

Fingeraftryk

Greenland
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Nutrition
Diet
Plasmas
Pesticides
Toxaphene
Seafood
Bioaccumulation
Mammals
Linear regression
Population
Linear Models
Blood
Regression Analysis
Lipids
Food
Control Groups
Testing

Citer dette

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title = "Exposure of Inuit in Greenland to organochlorines through the marine diet",
abstract = "High organochlorine concentrations have been found among the Inuit in eastern Canada and in Greenland. The present study was undertaken to assess the exposure to organochlorines in relation to age, sex, and diet in a general population sample of Inuit from Greenland. Survey data and plasma concentrations of 14 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and 16 pesticides, including 5 toxaphene congeners, were recorded in a random population survey of 408 adult indigenous Greenlanders. In a two-stage design, the survey response rate was 66{\%}, and 90{\%} of those randomly selected for blood testing participated. This was equivalent to an overall response rate of 59{\%}. The median plasma concentration of the sum of PCB congeners was 13.3 microg/L; the lipid-adjusted value was 2109 microg/kg. The PCB concentration was twice as high as among the Inuit of Nunavik, Canada, 25 times higher than in a control group from southern Canada, and several times higher than the values found in European studies. Concentrations were similarly elevated for all PCB congeners and pesticides. The PCB congener pattern was similar to previous observations from the eastern Canadian Arctic and Greenland. Concentrations showed statistically significant positive associations with age, marine diet, and male sex in multiple linear regression analyses. The exceptionally high plasma concentrations of several organochlorines among the Inuit of Greenland are attributed to a lifelong high intake of seafood, in particular marine mammals. Concentrations of PCB adjusted for the consumption of marine food increased until approximately 40 yr of age, which is equivalent to the birth cohorts of the early 1950s. The age pattern indicates that bioaccumulation of PCB started in the 1950s, which is a likely date for the introduction of the compounds into the Arctic environment.",
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Exposure of Inuit in Greenland to organochlorines through the marine diet. / Bjerregaard, P; Dewailly, E; Ayotte, P; Pars, T; Ferron, L; Mulvad, G.

I: Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues, Bind 62, Nr. 2, 26.01.2001, s. 69-81.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exposure of Inuit in Greenland to organochlorines through the marine diet

AU - Bjerregaard, P

AU - Dewailly, E

AU - Ayotte, P

AU - Pars, T

AU - Ferron, L

AU - Mulvad, G

PY - 2001/1/26

Y1 - 2001/1/26

N2 - High organochlorine concentrations have been found among the Inuit in eastern Canada and in Greenland. The present study was undertaken to assess the exposure to organochlorines in relation to age, sex, and diet in a general population sample of Inuit from Greenland. Survey data and plasma concentrations of 14 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and 16 pesticides, including 5 toxaphene congeners, were recorded in a random population survey of 408 adult indigenous Greenlanders. In a two-stage design, the survey response rate was 66%, and 90% of those randomly selected for blood testing participated. This was equivalent to an overall response rate of 59%. The median plasma concentration of the sum of PCB congeners was 13.3 microg/L; the lipid-adjusted value was 2109 microg/kg. The PCB concentration was twice as high as among the Inuit of Nunavik, Canada, 25 times higher than in a control group from southern Canada, and several times higher than the values found in European studies. Concentrations were similarly elevated for all PCB congeners and pesticides. The PCB congener pattern was similar to previous observations from the eastern Canadian Arctic and Greenland. Concentrations showed statistically significant positive associations with age, marine diet, and male sex in multiple linear regression analyses. The exceptionally high plasma concentrations of several organochlorines among the Inuit of Greenland are attributed to a lifelong high intake of seafood, in particular marine mammals. Concentrations of PCB adjusted for the consumption of marine food increased until approximately 40 yr of age, which is equivalent to the birth cohorts of the early 1950s. The age pattern indicates that bioaccumulation of PCB started in the 1950s, which is a likely date for the introduction of the compounds into the Arctic environment.

AB - High organochlorine concentrations have been found among the Inuit in eastern Canada and in Greenland. The present study was undertaken to assess the exposure to organochlorines in relation to age, sex, and diet in a general population sample of Inuit from Greenland. Survey data and plasma concentrations of 14 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and 16 pesticides, including 5 toxaphene congeners, were recorded in a random population survey of 408 adult indigenous Greenlanders. In a two-stage design, the survey response rate was 66%, and 90% of those randomly selected for blood testing participated. This was equivalent to an overall response rate of 59%. The median plasma concentration of the sum of PCB congeners was 13.3 microg/L; the lipid-adjusted value was 2109 microg/kg. The PCB concentration was twice as high as among the Inuit of Nunavik, Canada, 25 times higher than in a control group from southern Canada, and several times higher than the values found in European studies. Concentrations were similarly elevated for all PCB congeners and pesticides. The PCB congener pattern was similar to previous observations from the eastern Canadian Arctic and Greenland. Concentrations showed statistically significant positive associations with age, marine diet, and male sex in multiple linear regression analyses. The exceptionally high plasma concentrations of several organochlorines among the Inuit of Greenland are attributed to a lifelong high intake of seafood, in particular marine mammals. Concentrations of PCB adjusted for the consumption of marine food increased until approximately 40 yr of age, which is equivalent to the birth cohorts of the early 1950s. The age pattern indicates that bioaccumulation of PCB started in the 1950s, which is a likely date for the introduction of the compounds into the Arctic environment.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - Age Distribution

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Canada

KW - Case-Control Studies

KW - Diet

KW - Environmental Exposure

KW - Environmental Monitoring

KW - Female

KW - Food Habits

KW - Greenland

KW - Health Surveys

KW - Humans

KW - Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated

KW - Insecticides

KW - Inuits

KW - Linear Models

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Pesticide Residues

KW - Questionnaires

KW - Seafood

KW - Sex Distribution

U2 - 10.1080/009841001455490

DO - 10.1080/009841001455490

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 11209822

VL - 62

SP - 69

EP - 81

JO - Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues

JF - Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health. Part A: Current Issues

SN - 1528-7394

IS - 2

ER -