Exploring The Association Between Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Asthma: a Registry-Based Twin Study

Simon Francis Thomsen, Sophie V D Sluis, Lone G Stensballe, Danielle Posthuma, Axel Skytthe, Kirsten O Kyvik, David L Duffy, Vibeke Backer, Hans Bisgaard

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Mar-12
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Vol/bind179
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)1091-7
ISSN1073-449X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 12. mar. 2009

Fingeraftryk

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
Twin Studies
Registries
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Causality
Denmark
Smoking
Mothers

Citer dette

Thomsen, Simon Francis ; Sluis, Sophie V D ; Stensballe, Lone G ; Posthuma, Danielle ; Skytthe, Axel ; Kyvik, Kirsten O ; Duffy, David L ; Backer, Vibeke ; Bisgaard, Hans. / Exploring The Association Between Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Asthma: a Registry-Based Twin Study. I: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2009 ; Bind 179, Nr. 12. s. 1091-7.
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title = "Exploring The Association Between Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Asthma: a Registry-Based Twin Study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: We explored the nature of the association between severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and asthma in a population-based sample of twins. METHODS: Data on hospitalization due to RSV infection was gathered for all twins born in Denmark between 1994 and 2000 (8,280 pairs) and linked to information on asthma obtained from hospital discharge registries and parent-completed questionnaires. Genetic variance components models and direction of causation models were fitted to the observed data. RESULTS: RSV hospitalization and asthma were positively associated (r=0.43) and genetic determinants for the two disorders overlapped completely. Modeling the direction of causation between RSV hospitalization and asthma showed that a model, in which asthma {\^a}causes{\^a} RSV hospitalization fitted the data significantly better (p=0.39 for deterioration in model fit), than a model, in which RSV hospitalization {\^a}causes{\^a} asthma (p<0.001 for deterioration in model fit), even when sex, birth weight and maternal smoking during pregnancy were accounted for. CONCLUSIONS: RSV infection, severe enough to warrant hospitalization, does not cause asthma but is rather an indicator of the genetic predisposition to asthma.",
author = "Thomsen, {Simon Francis} and Sluis, {Sophie V D} and Stensballe, {Lone G} and Danielle Posthuma and Axel Skytthe and Kyvik, {Kirsten O} and Duffy, {David L} and Vibeke Backer and Hans Bisgaard",
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Exploring The Association Between Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Asthma: a Registry-Based Twin Study. / Thomsen, Simon Francis; Sluis, Sophie V D; Stensballe, Lone G; Posthuma, Danielle; Skytthe, Axel; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Duffy, David L; Backer, Vibeke; Bisgaard, Hans.

I: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Bind 179, Nr. 12, 12.03.2009, s. 1091-7.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring The Association Between Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Asthma: a Registry-Based Twin Study

AU - Thomsen, Simon Francis

AU - Sluis, Sophie V D

AU - Stensballe, Lone G

AU - Posthuma, Danielle

AU - Skytthe, Axel

AU - Kyvik, Kirsten O

AU - Duffy, David L

AU - Backer, Vibeke

AU - Bisgaard, Hans

PY - 2009/3/12

Y1 - 2009/3/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: We explored the nature of the association between severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and asthma in a population-based sample of twins. METHODS: Data on hospitalization due to RSV infection was gathered for all twins born in Denmark between 1994 and 2000 (8,280 pairs) and linked to information on asthma obtained from hospital discharge registries and parent-completed questionnaires. Genetic variance components models and direction of causation models were fitted to the observed data. RESULTS: RSV hospitalization and asthma were positively associated (r=0.43) and genetic determinants for the two disorders overlapped completely. Modeling the direction of causation between RSV hospitalization and asthma showed that a model, in which asthma âcausesâ RSV hospitalization fitted the data significantly better (p=0.39 for deterioration in model fit), than a model, in which RSV hospitalization âcausesâ asthma (p<0.001 for deterioration in model fit), even when sex, birth weight and maternal smoking during pregnancy were accounted for. CONCLUSIONS: RSV infection, severe enough to warrant hospitalization, does not cause asthma but is rather an indicator of the genetic predisposition to asthma.

AB - BACKGROUND: We explored the nature of the association between severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and asthma in a population-based sample of twins. METHODS: Data on hospitalization due to RSV infection was gathered for all twins born in Denmark between 1994 and 2000 (8,280 pairs) and linked to information on asthma obtained from hospital discharge registries and parent-completed questionnaires. Genetic variance components models and direction of causation models were fitted to the observed data. RESULTS: RSV hospitalization and asthma were positively associated (r=0.43) and genetic determinants for the two disorders overlapped completely. Modeling the direction of causation between RSV hospitalization and asthma showed that a model, in which asthma âcausesâ RSV hospitalization fitted the data significantly better (p=0.39 for deterioration in model fit), than a model, in which RSV hospitalization âcausesâ asthma (p<0.001 for deterioration in model fit), even when sex, birth weight and maternal smoking during pregnancy were accounted for. CONCLUSIONS: RSV infection, severe enough to warrant hospitalization, does not cause asthma but is rather an indicator of the genetic predisposition to asthma.

U2 - 10.1164/rccm.200809-1471OC

DO - 10.1164/rccm.200809-1471OC

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19286626

VL - 179

SP - 1091

EP - 1097

JO - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

JF - American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

SN - 1073-449X

IS - 12

ER -