Experiences with the export of education in health sciences from Denmark to Saudi Arabia

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Resumé

Background: Exports of entire educational programs from countries with established universities to other countries are increasing rapidly. Scant literature exists on education exports and related educational and pedagogical knowledge transfer. Evidence in this area helps us to develop better and more cost-effective future export programs, render knowledge transfer more efficiently and enhance intercultural learning in general—all important in the current globalized world. Aim: To share the experiences and lessons learned during the educational export project of two Bachelor of Science programs in health sciences from a Danish university to a newly established Saudi Arabian university. Methods: There were two contract periods: one of 4.5 years and another 1-year extension. An accredited program from Denmark was exported with the goal of gradually transferring the knowledge of the exporting staff to the local staff. Teams of one senior and two juniors traveled from the exporting university to the receiving university to deliver courses lasting 4 weeks each. Implicit knowledge comes from the personal experiences of the authors in the preparation, collaboration, administration, management and teaching of the two BSc programs. Explicit, written data come from the evaluation reports, for which 24 students and 31 staff members were interviewed, and from a review of document filing and administrative course material. Analysis was conducted based on the Neville and Warren theory of knowledge transfer in educational settings and using SWOT analysis. Analysis and Conclusion: Opportunities for knowledge transfer were not fully implemented; however, during the contract years, exchange and collaboration between the staff groups increased. The successful and well-received education export with sustainable knowledge transfer requires thorough and collaborative preparation and needs-based implementation. Learning to know each other’s working culture and creating mutual trust and acceptance take time and readiness to exchange expectations, views and experiences on equal footing.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftCreative Education
Vol/bind9
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)819-830
ISSN2151-4755
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 11. maj 2018

Fingeraftryk

knowledge transfer
Saudi Arabia
health science
Denmark
university
staff
education
experience
intercultural learning
educational setting
bachelor
educational program
acceptance
Teaching
costs
science
evaluation
management
learning
evidence

Citer dette

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title = "Experiences with the export of education in health sciences from Denmark to Saudi Arabia",
abstract = "Background: Exports of entire educational programs from countries with established universities to other countries are increasing rapidly. Scant literature exists on education exports and related educational and pedagogical knowledge transfer. Evidence in this area helps us to develop better and more cost-effective future export programs, render knowledge transfer more efficiently and enhance intercultural learning in general—all important in the current globalized world. Aim: To share the experiences and lessons learned during the educational export project of two Bachelor of Science programs in health sciences from a Danish university to a newly established Saudi Arabian university. Methods: There were two contract periods: one of 4.5 years and another 1-year extension. An accredited program from Denmark was exported with the goal of gradually transferring the knowledge of the exporting staff to the local staff. Teams of one senior and two juniors traveled from the exporting university to the receiving university to deliver courses lasting 4 weeks each. Implicit knowledge comes from the personal experiences of the authors in the preparation, collaboration, administration, management and teaching of the two BSc programs. Explicit, written data come from the evaluation reports, for which 24 students and 31 staff members were interviewed, and from a review of document filing and administrative course material. Analysis was conducted based on the Neville and Warren theory of knowledge transfer in educational settings and using SWOT analysis. Analysis and Conclusion: Opportunities for knowledge transfer were not fully implemented; however, during the contract years, exchange and collaboration between the staff groups increased. The successful and well-received education export with sustainable knowledge transfer requires thorough and collaborative preparation and needs-based implementation. Learning to know each other’s working culture and creating mutual trust and acceptance take time and readiness to exchange expectations, views and experiences on equal footing.",
author = "Aro, {Arja R.} and {Eklund Karlsson}, Leena and Ikonen, {Anne Leena} and Maria Palianopoulou and Nielsen, {Jesper Bo}",
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Experiences with the export of education in health sciences from Denmark to Saudi Arabia. / Aro, Arja R.; Eklund Karlsson, Leena; Ikonen, Anne Leena; Palianopoulou, Maria ; Nielsen, Jesper Bo.

I: Creative Education, Bind 9, Nr. 6, 11.05.2018, s. 819-830.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experiences with the export of education in health sciences from Denmark to Saudi Arabia

AU - Aro, Arja R.

AU - Eklund Karlsson, Leena

AU - Ikonen, Anne Leena

AU - Palianopoulou, Maria

AU - Nielsen, Jesper Bo

PY - 2018/5/11

Y1 - 2018/5/11

N2 - Background: Exports of entire educational programs from countries with established universities to other countries are increasing rapidly. Scant literature exists on education exports and related educational and pedagogical knowledge transfer. Evidence in this area helps us to develop better and more cost-effective future export programs, render knowledge transfer more efficiently and enhance intercultural learning in general—all important in the current globalized world. Aim: To share the experiences and lessons learned during the educational export project of two Bachelor of Science programs in health sciences from a Danish university to a newly established Saudi Arabian university. Methods: There were two contract periods: one of 4.5 years and another 1-year extension. An accredited program from Denmark was exported with the goal of gradually transferring the knowledge of the exporting staff to the local staff. Teams of one senior and two juniors traveled from the exporting university to the receiving university to deliver courses lasting 4 weeks each. Implicit knowledge comes from the personal experiences of the authors in the preparation, collaboration, administration, management and teaching of the two BSc programs. Explicit, written data come from the evaluation reports, for which 24 students and 31 staff members were interviewed, and from a review of document filing and administrative course material. Analysis was conducted based on the Neville and Warren theory of knowledge transfer in educational settings and using SWOT analysis. Analysis and Conclusion: Opportunities for knowledge transfer were not fully implemented; however, during the contract years, exchange and collaboration between the staff groups increased. The successful and well-received education export with sustainable knowledge transfer requires thorough and collaborative preparation and needs-based implementation. Learning to know each other’s working culture and creating mutual trust and acceptance take time and readiness to exchange expectations, views and experiences on equal footing.

AB - Background: Exports of entire educational programs from countries with established universities to other countries are increasing rapidly. Scant literature exists on education exports and related educational and pedagogical knowledge transfer. Evidence in this area helps us to develop better and more cost-effective future export programs, render knowledge transfer more efficiently and enhance intercultural learning in general—all important in the current globalized world. Aim: To share the experiences and lessons learned during the educational export project of two Bachelor of Science programs in health sciences from a Danish university to a newly established Saudi Arabian university. Methods: There were two contract periods: one of 4.5 years and another 1-year extension. An accredited program from Denmark was exported with the goal of gradually transferring the knowledge of the exporting staff to the local staff. Teams of one senior and two juniors traveled from the exporting university to the receiving university to deliver courses lasting 4 weeks each. Implicit knowledge comes from the personal experiences of the authors in the preparation, collaboration, administration, management and teaching of the two BSc programs. Explicit, written data come from the evaluation reports, for which 24 students and 31 staff members were interviewed, and from a review of document filing and administrative course material. Analysis was conducted based on the Neville and Warren theory of knowledge transfer in educational settings and using SWOT analysis. Analysis and Conclusion: Opportunities for knowledge transfer were not fully implemented; however, during the contract years, exchange and collaboration between the staff groups increased. The successful and well-received education export with sustainable knowledge transfer requires thorough and collaborative preparation and needs-based implementation. Learning to know each other’s working culture and creating mutual trust and acceptance take time and readiness to exchange expectations, views and experiences on equal footing.

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DO - 10.4236/ce.2018.96060

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VL - 9

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EP - 830

JO - Creative Education

JF - Creative Education

SN - 2151-4755

IS - 6

ER -