Experiences developing socially acceptable interactions for a robotic trash barrel

Stephen Yang, Brian Ka Jun Mok, David Sirkin, Hillary Page Ive, Rohan Maheshwari, Kerstin Fischer, Wendy Ju

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

Resumé

Service robots in public places need to both understand environmental cues and move in ways that people can understand and predict. We developed and tested interactions with a trash barrel robot to better understand the implicit protocols for public interaction. In eight lunch-time sessions spread across two crowded campus dining destinations, we experimented with piloting our robot in Wizard of Oz fashion, initiating and responding to requests for impromptu interactions centered on collecting people's trash. Our studies progressed from open-ended experimentation to testing specific interaction strategies that seemed to evoke clear engagement and responses, both positive and negative. Observations and interviews show that a) people most welcome the robot's presence when they need its services and it actively advertises its intent through movement; b) people create mental models of the trash barrel as having intentions and desires; c) mistakes in navigation are indicators of autonomous control, rather than a remote operator; and d) repeated mistakes and struggling behavior polarized responses as either ignoring or endearing.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelProceedings of the 24th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication
ForlagIEEE
Publikationsdato2015
Sider277-284
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015
Begivenhed24th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, RO-MAN 2015 - Kobe, Japan
Varighed: 31. aug. 20154. sep. 2015

Konference

Konference24th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, RO-MAN 2015
LandJapan
ByKobe
Periode31/08/201504/09/2015
SponsorIEEE Robotics and Automation Society (IEEE RAS), Korea Robotics Society (KROS), The Robotics Society of Japan (RSJ)

Fingeraftryk

Robotics
Robots
Navigation
Testing

Citer dette

Yang, S., Mok, B. K. J., Sirkin, D., Ive, H. P., Maheshwari, R., Fischer, K., & Ju, W. (2015). Experiences developing socially acceptable interactions for a robotic trash barrel. I Proceedings of the 24th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (s. 277-284). IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/ROMAN.2015.7333693
Yang, Stephen ; Mok, Brian Ka Jun ; Sirkin, David ; Ive, Hillary Page ; Maheshwari, Rohan ; Fischer, Kerstin ; Ju, Wendy. / Experiences developing socially acceptable interactions for a robotic trash barrel. Proceedings of the 24th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. IEEE, 2015. s. 277-284
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Yang, S, Mok, BKJ, Sirkin, D, Ive, HP, Maheshwari, R, Fischer, K & Ju, W 2015, Experiences developing socially acceptable interactions for a robotic trash barrel. i Proceedings of the 24th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. IEEE, s. 277-284, 24th IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, RO-MAN 2015, Kobe, Japan, 31/08/2015. https://doi.org/10.1109/ROMAN.2015.7333693

Experiences developing socially acceptable interactions for a robotic trash barrel. / Yang, Stephen; Mok, Brian Ka Jun; Sirkin, David; Ive, Hillary Page; Maheshwari, Rohan; Fischer, Kerstin; Ju, Wendy.

Proceedings of the 24th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. IEEE, 2015. s. 277-284.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

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Yang S, Mok BKJ, Sirkin D, Ive HP, Maheshwari R, Fischer K et al. Experiences developing socially acceptable interactions for a robotic trash barrel. I Proceedings of the 24th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. IEEE. 2015. s. 277-284 https://doi.org/10.1109/ROMAN.2015.7333693