Expensive blood safety initiatives may offer less benefit than we think

Mads Kamper-Jørgensen, Henrik Hjalgrim, Gustaf Edgren, Kjell Titlestad, Henrik Ullum, Agneta Shanwell, Marie Reilly, Mads Melbye, Olof Nyrén, Klaus Rostgaard

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Jan
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftTransfusion
Vol/bind50
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)240-2
Antal sider2
ISSN0041-1132
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. jan. 2010

Fingeraftryk

Cost-Benefit Analysis
Infectious Disease Transmission
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Nucleic Acids

Citer dette

Kamper-Jørgensen, M., Hjalgrim, H., Edgren, G., Titlestad, K., Ullum, H., Shanwell, A., ... Rostgaard, K. (2010). Expensive blood safety initiatives may offer less benefit than we think. Transfusion, 50(1), 240-2. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02374.x
Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads ; Hjalgrim, Henrik ; Edgren, Gustaf ; Titlestad, Kjell ; Ullum, Henrik ; Shanwell, Agneta ; Reilly, Marie ; Melbye, Mads ; Nyrén, Olof ; Rostgaard, Klaus. / Expensive blood safety initiatives may offer less benefit than we think. I: Transfusion. 2010 ; Bind 50, Nr. 1. s. 240-2.
@article{5f6e4aa0492711df937d000ea68e967b,
title = "Expensive blood safety initiatives may offer less benefit than we think",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Various blood safety initiatives have ensured a historically low risk of infection transmission through blood transfusion. Although further prevention of infection transmission is possible through, for example, nucleic acid testing and future introduction of pathogen inactivation, such initiatives are very costly in relation to the benefit they offer. Although estimation of the cost-effectiveness requires detailed information about the survival of transfusion recipients, previous cost-effectiveness analyses have relied on incorrect survival assumptions. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Based on empirical data of more than 1 million Scandinavian transfusion recipients followed for up to 20 years, we present two new survival functions. In a fictitious example we assessed the impact of survival assumptions on the estimated costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, by using the survival functions of three previous cost-effectiveness analyses along with the two new survival functions. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that despite considerable costs, previous cost-effectiveness studies may have underestimated the costs per QALY gained by as much as 44{\%}.",
keywords = "Blood Banks, Blood Transfusion, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Infection, Infection Control, Quality of Health Care, Quality-Adjusted Life Years, Risk Factors, Scandinavia, Survival Analysis",
author = "Mads Kamper-J{\o}rgensen and Henrik Hjalgrim and Gustaf Edgren and Kjell Titlestad and Henrik Ullum and Agneta Shanwell and Marie Reilly and Mads Melbye and Olof Nyr{\'e}n and Klaus Rostgaard",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02374.x",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "240--2",
journal = "Transfusion",
issn = "0041-1132",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

Kamper-Jørgensen, M, Hjalgrim, H, Edgren, G, Titlestad, K, Ullum, H, Shanwell, A, Reilly, M, Melbye, M, Nyrén, O & Rostgaard, K 2010, 'Expensive blood safety initiatives may offer less benefit than we think', Transfusion, bind 50, nr. 1, s. 240-2. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02374.x

Expensive blood safety initiatives may offer less benefit than we think. / Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf; Titlestad, Kjell; Ullum, Henrik; Shanwell, Agneta; Reilly, Marie; Melbye, Mads; Nyrén, Olof; Rostgaard, Klaus.

I: Transfusion, Bind 50, Nr. 1, 01.01.2010, s. 240-2.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Expensive blood safety initiatives may offer less benefit than we think

AU - Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

AU - Hjalgrim, Henrik

AU - Edgren, Gustaf

AU - Titlestad, Kjell

AU - Ullum, Henrik

AU - Shanwell, Agneta

AU - Reilly, Marie

AU - Melbye, Mads

AU - Nyrén, Olof

AU - Rostgaard, Klaus

PY - 2010/1/1

Y1 - 2010/1/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Various blood safety initiatives have ensured a historically low risk of infection transmission through blood transfusion. Although further prevention of infection transmission is possible through, for example, nucleic acid testing and future introduction of pathogen inactivation, such initiatives are very costly in relation to the benefit they offer. Although estimation of the cost-effectiveness requires detailed information about the survival of transfusion recipients, previous cost-effectiveness analyses have relied on incorrect survival assumptions. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Based on empirical data of more than 1 million Scandinavian transfusion recipients followed for up to 20 years, we present two new survival functions. In a fictitious example we assessed the impact of survival assumptions on the estimated costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, by using the survival functions of three previous cost-effectiveness analyses along with the two new survival functions. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that despite considerable costs, previous cost-effectiveness studies may have underestimated the costs per QALY gained by as much as 44%.

AB - BACKGROUND: Various blood safety initiatives have ensured a historically low risk of infection transmission through blood transfusion. Although further prevention of infection transmission is possible through, for example, nucleic acid testing and future introduction of pathogen inactivation, such initiatives are very costly in relation to the benefit they offer. Although estimation of the cost-effectiveness requires detailed information about the survival of transfusion recipients, previous cost-effectiveness analyses have relied on incorrect survival assumptions. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Based on empirical data of more than 1 million Scandinavian transfusion recipients followed for up to 20 years, we present two new survival functions. In a fictitious example we assessed the impact of survival assumptions on the estimated costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, by using the survival functions of three previous cost-effectiveness analyses along with the two new survival functions. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that despite considerable costs, previous cost-effectiveness studies may have underestimated the costs per QALY gained by as much as 44%.

KW - Blood Banks

KW - Blood Transfusion

KW - Cost-Benefit Analysis

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Humans

KW - Infection

KW - Infection Control

KW - Quality of Health Care

KW - Quality-Adjusted Life Years

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Scandinavia

KW - Survival Analysis

U2 - 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02374.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02374.x

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19761551

VL - 50

SP - 240

EP - 242

JO - Transfusion

JF - Transfusion

SN - 0041-1132

IS - 1

ER -

Kamper-Jørgensen M, Hjalgrim H, Edgren G, Titlestad K, Ullum H, Shanwell A et al. Expensive blood safety initiatives may offer less benefit than we think. Transfusion. 2010 jan 1;50(1):240-2. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02374.x