Examining Multiscale Movement Coordination in Collaborative Problem Solving

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

Resumé

During collaborative problem solving (CPS), coordination
occurs at different spatial and temporal scales. This multiscale coordination should, at least on some scales, play a functional
role in facilitating effective collaboration outcomes. To
evaluate this, we conducted a study of computer-based CPS
with 42 dyads. We used cross-wavelet coherence as a way to examine the degree to which movement coordination is evident at a variety of scales and tested whether the observed coordination was greater than
both the amount expected due to chance and due to task demands. We found that coordination at scales less than 2s was greater than expected due to chance and at most scales (except 16s, 1m, and 2m) was greater than expected due to task demands. Lastly, we evaluated whether the degree of coherence at scales less than
2s, and the form of coordination (in terms of relative phase), were
predictive of CPS performance. We found that .25s and 1s scales were predictive of performance. When including relative phase, our results suggest that higher in-phase movement coordination at the 1s scale was the strongest predictor of CPS performance. We discuss these findings and detail their relevance for expanding our knowledge on how coordination facilitates CPS.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Titel39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2017) : Computational Foundations of Cognition
Vol/bind1
ForlagCognitive Science Society
Publikationsdato2017
Sider1345-1350
ISBN (Elektronisk)978-1-5108-4661-6
StatusUdgivet - 2017
Begivenhed39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society - Hilton London Metropole, London, Storbritannien
Varighed: 26. jul. 201729. jul. 2017
Konferencens nummer: 39

Konference

Konference39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society
Nummer39
LokationHilton London Metropole
LandStorbritannien
ByLondon
Periode26/07/201729/07/2017

Fingeraftryk

functional role
co-ordination
wavelet
demand

Citer dette

Wiltshire, T., & Steffensen, S. V. (2017). Examining Multiscale Movement Coordination in Collaborative Problem Solving. I 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2017) : Computational Foundations of Cognition (Bind 1, s. 1345-1350). Cognitive Science Society.
Wiltshire, Travis ; Steffensen, Sune Vork. / Examining Multiscale Movement Coordination in Collaborative Problem Solving. 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2017) : Computational Foundations of Cognition. Bind 1 Cognitive Science Society, 2017. s. 1345-1350
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title = "Examining Multiscale Movement Coordination in Collaborative Problem Solving",
abstract = "During collaborative problem solving (CPS), coordination occurs at different spatial and temporal scales. This multiscale coordination should, at least on some scales, play a functional role in facilitating effective collaboration outcomes. To evaluate this, we conducted a study of computer-based CPS with 42 dyads. We used cross-wavelet coherence as a way to examine the degree to which movement coordination is evident at a variety of scales and tested whether the observed coordination was greater thanboth the amount expected due to chance and due to task demands. We found that coordination at scales less than 2s was greater than expected due to chance and at most scales (except 16s, 1m, and 2m) was greater than expected due to task demands. Lastly, we evaluated whether the degree of coherence at scales less than 2s, and the form of coordination (in terms of relative phase), were predictive of CPS performance. We found that .25s and 1s scales were predictive of performance. When including relative phase, our results suggest that higher in-phase movement coordination at the 1s scale was the strongest predictor of CPS performance. We discuss these findings and detail their relevance for expanding our knowledge on how coordination facilitates CPS.",
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Wiltshire, T & Steffensen, SV 2017, Examining Multiscale Movement Coordination in Collaborative Problem Solving. i 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2017) : Computational Foundations of Cognition. bind 1, Cognitive Science Society, s. 1345-1350, 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, London, Storbritannien, 26/07/2017.

Examining Multiscale Movement Coordination in Collaborative Problem Solving. / Wiltshire, Travis; Steffensen, Sune Vork.

39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2017) : Computational Foundations of Cognition. Bind 1 Cognitive Science Society, 2017. s. 1345-1350.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

TY - GEN

T1 - Examining Multiscale Movement Coordination in Collaborative Problem Solving

AU - Wiltshire, Travis

AU - Steffensen, Sune Vork

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - During collaborative problem solving (CPS), coordination occurs at different spatial and temporal scales. This multiscale coordination should, at least on some scales, play a functional role in facilitating effective collaboration outcomes. To evaluate this, we conducted a study of computer-based CPS with 42 dyads. We used cross-wavelet coherence as a way to examine the degree to which movement coordination is evident at a variety of scales and tested whether the observed coordination was greater thanboth the amount expected due to chance and due to task demands. We found that coordination at scales less than 2s was greater than expected due to chance and at most scales (except 16s, 1m, and 2m) was greater than expected due to task demands. Lastly, we evaluated whether the degree of coherence at scales less than 2s, and the form of coordination (in terms of relative phase), were predictive of CPS performance. We found that .25s and 1s scales were predictive of performance. When including relative phase, our results suggest that higher in-phase movement coordination at the 1s scale was the strongest predictor of CPS performance. We discuss these findings and detail their relevance for expanding our knowledge on how coordination facilitates CPS.

AB - During collaborative problem solving (CPS), coordination occurs at different spatial and temporal scales. This multiscale coordination should, at least on some scales, play a functional role in facilitating effective collaboration outcomes. To evaluate this, we conducted a study of computer-based CPS with 42 dyads. We used cross-wavelet coherence as a way to examine the degree to which movement coordination is evident at a variety of scales and tested whether the observed coordination was greater thanboth the amount expected due to chance and due to task demands. We found that coordination at scales less than 2s was greater than expected due to chance and at most scales (except 16s, 1m, and 2m) was greater than expected due to task demands. Lastly, we evaluated whether the degree of coherence at scales less than 2s, and the form of coordination (in terms of relative phase), were predictive of CPS performance. We found that .25s and 1s scales were predictive of performance. When including relative phase, our results suggest that higher in-phase movement coordination at the 1s scale was the strongest predictor of CPS performance. We discuss these findings and detail their relevance for expanding our knowledge on how coordination facilitates CPS.

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KW - dynamical systems

KW - synchrony

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BT - 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2017)

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Wiltshire T, Steffensen SV. Examining Multiscale Movement Coordination in Collaborative Problem Solving. I 39th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2017) : Computational Foundations of Cognition. Bind 1. Cognitive Science Society. 2017. s. 1345-1350