Ethnic disparity in stillbirth and infant mortality in Denmark 1981-2003

Sarah F Villadsen, Laust H Mortensen, Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2009
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health
Vol/bind63
Sider (fra-til)106-112
Antal sider7
ISSN0143-005X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. jan. 2009

Fingeraftryk

Stillbirth
Denmark
Population
Minority Groups
Registries
Cause of Death
Mothers
Confidence Intervals

Citer dette

Villadsen, Sarah F ; Mortensen, Laust H ; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie. / Ethnic disparity in stillbirth and infant mortality in Denmark 1981-2003. I: Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. 2009 ; Bind 63. s. 106-112.
@article{e55c3ff0cdd111dd9908000ea68e967b,
title = "Ethnic disparity in stillbirth and infant mortality in Denmark 1981-2003",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Ethnic minorities constitute a growing part of the Danish population but little is known about ethnic disparity in early life mortality in this population. The aim of this study was to investigate ethnic disparities in stillbirth risk and infant mortality in Denmark from 1981 to 2003. Design and settings: From population-covering registries we identified all live and stillbirths of women from the five largest ethnic minority groups and of women from the (Danish) majority population (n=1 333 452). The live born were followed-up for vital status to the age of 1 year. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate relative risks according to ethnic group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Stillbirth and infant death. RESULTS: Compared to the majority population, the relative risks of stillbirth were 1.28 (95{\%} confidence interval: 1.07-1.53) for Turkish, 1.62 (1.25-2.09) for Pakistani, and 2.11 (1.60-2.77) for Somali women. The relative risks of infant mortality were 1.41 (1.22-1.63), 1.88 (1.53-2.30), 1.39 (1.03-1.89) for children born of Turkish, Pakistani, and Somali mothers, respectively. The fetal and infant mortality in offspring of Lebanese and Former Yugoslavian women was not different from the mortality in the Danish group. The differences found were, in general, not attributable to ethnic differences in socioeconomic position. Turkish, Pakistani, and Somali children had an excess relative risk of infant death due to congenital malformations and the risk of death of perinatal causes was increased among the Pakistani offspring. CONCLUSION: Among the five largest ethnic minorities, the Turkish. Pakistani, and Somali population had substantially higher fetal and infant mortality compared to the Danish majority population, while the Lebanese and Former Yugoslavian minorities were at the same level as the majority population. The excess risk was not attributable to socioeconomic conditions.",
author = "Villadsen, {Sarah F} and Mortensen, {Laust H} and {Nybo Andersen}, Anne-Marie",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/jech.2008.078741",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "106--112",
journal = "Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health",
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Ethnic disparity in stillbirth and infant mortality in Denmark 1981-2003. / Villadsen, Sarah F; Mortensen, Laust H; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie.

I: Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, Bind 63, 01.01.2009, s. 106-112.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ethnic disparity in stillbirth and infant mortality in Denmark 1981-2003

AU - Villadsen, Sarah F

AU - Mortensen, Laust H

AU - Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie

PY - 2009/1/1

Y1 - 2009/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Ethnic minorities constitute a growing part of the Danish population but little is known about ethnic disparity in early life mortality in this population. The aim of this study was to investigate ethnic disparities in stillbirth risk and infant mortality in Denmark from 1981 to 2003. Design and settings: From population-covering registries we identified all live and stillbirths of women from the five largest ethnic minority groups and of women from the (Danish) majority population (n=1 333 452). The live born were followed-up for vital status to the age of 1 year. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate relative risks according to ethnic group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Stillbirth and infant death. RESULTS: Compared to the majority population, the relative risks of stillbirth were 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 1.07-1.53) for Turkish, 1.62 (1.25-2.09) for Pakistani, and 2.11 (1.60-2.77) for Somali women. The relative risks of infant mortality were 1.41 (1.22-1.63), 1.88 (1.53-2.30), 1.39 (1.03-1.89) for children born of Turkish, Pakistani, and Somali mothers, respectively. The fetal and infant mortality in offspring of Lebanese and Former Yugoslavian women was not different from the mortality in the Danish group. The differences found were, in general, not attributable to ethnic differences in socioeconomic position. Turkish, Pakistani, and Somali children had an excess relative risk of infant death due to congenital malformations and the risk of death of perinatal causes was increased among the Pakistani offspring. CONCLUSION: Among the five largest ethnic minorities, the Turkish. Pakistani, and Somali population had substantially higher fetal and infant mortality compared to the Danish majority population, while the Lebanese and Former Yugoslavian minorities were at the same level as the majority population. The excess risk was not attributable to socioeconomic conditions.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Ethnic minorities constitute a growing part of the Danish population but little is known about ethnic disparity in early life mortality in this population. The aim of this study was to investigate ethnic disparities in stillbirth risk and infant mortality in Denmark from 1981 to 2003. Design and settings: From population-covering registries we identified all live and stillbirths of women from the five largest ethnic minority groups and of women from the (Danish) majority population (n=1 333 452). The live born were followed-up for vital status to the age of 1 year. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate relative risks according to ethnic group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Stillbirth and infant death. RESULTS: Compared to the majority population, the relative risks of stillbirth were 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 1.07-1.53) for Turkish, 1.62 (1.25-2.09) for Pakistani, and 2.11 (1.60-2.77) for Somali women. The relative risks of infant mortality were 1.41 (1.22-1.63), 1.88 (1.53-2.30), 1.39 (1.03-1.89) for children born of Turkish, Pakistani, and Somali mothers, respectively. The fetal and infant mortality in offspring of Lebanese and Former Yugoslavian women was not different from the mortality in the Danish group. The differences found were, in general, not attributable to ethnic differences in socioeconomic position. Turkish, Pakistani, and Somali children had an excess relative risk of infant death due to congenital malformations and the risk of death of perinatal causes was increased among the Pakistani offspring. CONCLUSION: Among the five largest ethnic minorities, the Turkish. Pakistani, and Somali population had substantially higher fetal and infant mortality compared to the Danish majority population, while the Lebanese and Former Yugoslavian minorities were at the same level as the majority population. The excess risk was not attributable to socioeconomic conditions.

U2 - 10.1136/jech.2008.078741

DO - 10.1136/jech.2008.078741

M3 - Journal article

VL - 63

SP - 106

EP - 112

JO - Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

JF - Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

SN - 0143-005X

ER -