Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

Michael Olsen, Sara Greve, Marie Blicher, Ruan Kruger, Thomas Berend Sehestedt, Susanne Rasmussen, Julie K K Vishram, Pierre Boutouyrie, Stéphane Laurent

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

Resumé

OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood pressure and previously published equations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ePWV could predict CV events independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and/or cfPWV.

DESIGN AND METHOD: cfPWV was measured and ePWV calculated in 2366 apparently healthy subjects from four age groups of the Danish MONICA10 cohort. Additionally, the subjects were divided in four CV risk groups based on Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) or Framingham risk score (FRS). In 2006 the combined CV endpoint (CEP) of CV death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke and hospitalization for ischemic heart disease was registered. Most results were retested in 1045 hypertensive patients from a Paris cohort.

RESULTS: Bland Altman plot demonstrated a relative difference of -0.3 % (95% confidence interval (CI) -15-17%) between ePWV and cfPWV. In Cox regression models in apparently healthy subjects, ePVW and cfPWV (per standard deviation) added independently to SCORE in prediction of CEP (HR [95% CI] = 1.38[1.09-1.76] and HR [95% CI] = 1.18[1.01-1.38]) and to FRS (HR [95% CI] = 1.33[1.06-1.66] and HR [95% CI] = 1.16[0.99-1.37]). If healthy subjects with ePWV and/or cfPWV ≥ 10 m/s were reclassified to a higher SCORE risk category, net reclassification index (NRI) was 10.8%, P < 0.01 (Table 1). These results were reproduced in the Paris cohort.

CONCLUSIONS: ePWV predicted major CV events independently of SCORE, FRS and cfPWV indicating that these traditional risk scores have underestimated the complicated impact of age and blood pressure on arterial stiffness and CV risk.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
ArtikelnummerOS 14-08
TidsskriftJournal of Hypertension
Vol/bind34
Udgave nummere-suppl. 1
Sider (fra-til)e214
Antal sider1
ISSN0263-6352
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2016
BegivenhedThe 26th Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Hypertension - Coex , Seoul, Sydkorea
Varighed: 24. sep. 201629. sep. 2016

Konference

KonferenceThe 26th Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Hypertension
LokationCoex
LandSydkorea
BySeoul
Periode24/09/201629/09/2016

Fingeraftryk

Confidence Intervals
Paris
Vascular Stiffness
Proportional Hazards Models
Age Groups

Citer dette

Olsen, Michael ; Greve, Sara ; Blicher, Marie ; Kruger, Ruan ; Sehestedt, Thomas Berend ; Rasmussen, Susanne ; Vishram, Julie K K ; Boutouyrie, Pierre ; Laurent, Stéphane. / Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. I: Journal of Hypertension. 2016 ; Bind 34 , Nr. e-suppl. 1. s. e214.
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title = "Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood pressure and previously published equations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ePWV could predict CV events independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and/or cfPWV.DESIGN AND METHOD: cfPWV was measured and ePWV calculated in 2366 apparently healthy subjects from four age groups of the Danish MONICA10 cohort. Additionally, the subjects were divided in four CV risk groups based on Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) or Framingham risk score (FRS). In 2006 the combined CV endpoint (CEP) of CV death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke and hospitalization for ischemic heart disease was registered. Most results were retested in 1045 hypertensive patients from a Paris cohort.RESULTS: Bland Altman plot demonstrated a relative difference of -0.3 {\%} (95{\%} confidence interval (CI) -15-17{\%}) between ePWV and cfPWV. In Cox regression models in apparently healthy subjects, ePVW and cfPWV (per standard deviation) added independently to SCORE in prediction of CEP (HR [95{\%} CI] = 1.38[1.09-1.76] and HR [95{\%} CI] = 1.18[1.01-1.38]) and to FRS (HR [95{\%} CI] = 1.33[1.06-1.66] and HR [95{\%} CI] = 1.16[0.99-1.37]). If healthy subjects with ePWV and/or cfPWV ≥ 10 m/s were reclassified to a higher SCORE risk category, net reclassification index (NRI) was 10.8{\%}, P < 0.01 (Table 1). These results were reproduced in the Paris cohort.CONCLUSIONS: ePWV predicted major CV events independently of SCORE, FRS and cfPWV indicating that these traditional risk scores have underestimated the complicated impact of age and blood pressure on arterial stiffness and CV risk.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Michael Olsen and Sara Greve and Marie Blicher and Ruan Kruger and Sehestedt, {Thomas Berend} and Susanne Rasmussen and Vishram, {Julie K K} and Pierre Boutouyrie and St{\'e}phane Laurent",
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Olsen, M, Greve, S, Blicher, M, Kruger, R, Sehestedt, TB, Rasmussen, S, Vishram, JKK, Boutouyrie, P & Laurent, S 2016, 'Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity', Journal of Hypertension, bind 34 , nr. e-suppl. 1, OS 14-08, s. e214. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.hjh.0000500466.31870.0c

Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. / Olsen, Michael; Greve, Sara; Blicher, Marie; Kruger, Ruan; Sehestedt, Thomas Berend; Rasmussen, Susanne; Vishram, Julie K K; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Laurent, Stéphane.

I: Journal of Hypertension, Bind 34 , Nr. e-suppl. 1, OS 14-08, 2016, s. e214.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt i tidsskriftForskningpeer review

TY - ABST

T1 - Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

AU - Olsen, Michael

AU - Greve, Sara

AU - Blicher, Marie

AU - Kruger, Ruan

AU - Sehestedt, Thomas Berend

AU - Rasmussen, Susanne

AU - Vishram, Julie K K

AU - Boutouyrie, Pierre

AU - Laurent, Stéphane

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood pressure and previously published equations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ePWV could predict CV events independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and/or cfPWV.DESIGN AND METHOD: cfPWV was measured and ePWV calculated in 2366 apparently healthy subjects from four age groups of the Danish MONICA10 cohort. Additionally, the subjects were divided in four CV risk groups based on Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) or Framingham risk score (FRS). In 2006 the combined CV endpoint (CEP) of CV death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke and hospitalization for ischemic heart disease was registered. Most results were retested in 1045 hypertensive patients from a Paris cohort.RESULTS: Bland Altman plot demonstrated a relative difference of -0.3 % (95% confidence interval (CI) -15-17%) between ePWV and cfPWV. In Cox regression models in apparently healthy subjects, ePVW and cfPWV (per standard deviation) added independently to SCORE in prediction of CEP (HR [95% CI] = 1.38[1.09-1.76] and HR [95% CI] = 1.18[1.01-1.38]) and to FRS (HR [95% CI] = 1.33[1.06-1.66] and HR [95% CI] = 1.16[0.99-1.37]). If healthy subjects with ePWV and/or cfPWV ≥ 10 m/s were reclassified to a higher SCORE risk category, net reclassification index (NRI) was 10.8%, P < 0.01 (Table 1). These results were reproduced in the Paris cohort.CONCLUSIONS: ePWV predicted major CV events independently of SCORE, FRS and cfPWV indicating that these traditional risk scores have underestimated the complicated impact of age and blood pressure on arterial stiffness and CV risk.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood pressure and previously published equations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ePWV could predict CV events independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and/or cfPWV.DESIGN AND METHOD: cfPWV was measured and ePWV calculated in 2366 apparently healthy subjects from four age groups of the Danish MONICA10 cohort. Additionally, the subjects were divided in four CV risk groups based on Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) or Framingham risk score (FRS). In 2006 the combined CV endpoint (CEP) of CV death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke and hospitalization for ischemic heart disease was registered. Most results were retested in 1045 hypertensive patients from a Paris cohort.RESULTS: Bland Altman plot demonstrated a relative difference of -0.3 % (95% confidence interval (CI) -15-17%) between ePWV and cfPWV. In Cox regression models in apparently healthy subjects, ePVW and cfPWV (per standard deviation) added independently to SCORE in prediction of CEP (HR [95% CI] = 1.38[1.09-1.76] and HR [95% CI] = 1.18[1.01-1.38]) and to FRS (HR [95% CI] = 1.33[1.06-1.66] and HR [95% CI] = 1.16[0.99-1.37]). If healthy subjects with ePWV and/or cfPWV ≥ 10 m/s were reclassified to a higher SCORE risk category, net reclassification index (NRI) was 10.8%, P < 0.01 (Table 1). These results were reproduced in the Paris cohort.CONCLUSIONS: ePWV predicted major CV events independently of SCORE, FRS and cfPWV indicating that these traditional risk scores have underestimated the complicated impact of age and blood pressure on arterial stiffness and CV risk.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1097/01.hjh.0000500466.31870.0c

DO - 10.1097/01.hjh.0000500466.31870.0c

M3 - Conference abstract in journal

C2 - 27754051

VL - 34

SP - e214

JO - Journal of Hypertension

JF - Journal of Hypertension

SN - 0263-6352

IS - e-suppl. 1

M1 - OS 14-08

ER -