Escherichia coli Uropathogenesis In Vitro

Invasion, Cellular Escape, and Secondary Infection Analyzed in a Human Bladder Cell Infection Model

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are capable of invading bladder epithelial cells (BECs) on the bladder luminal surface. Based primarily on studies in mouse models, invasion is proposed to trigger an intracellular uropathogenic cascade involving intracellular bacterial proliferation followed by escape of elongated, filamentous bacteria from colonized BECs. UPEC filaments on the mouse bladder epithelium are able to revert to rod-shaped bacteria, which are believed to invade neighboring cells to initiate new rounds of intracellular colonization. So far, however, these late-stage infection events have not been replicated in vitro. We have established an in vitro model of human bladder cell infection by the use of a flow chamber (FC)-based culture system, which allows investigation of steps subsequent to initial invasion. Short-term bacterial colonization on the FC-BEC layer led to intracellular colonization. Exposing invaded BECs to a flow of urine, i.e., establishing conditions similar to those faced by UPEC reemerging on the bladder luminal surface, led to outgrowth of filamentous bacteria similar to what has been reported to occur in mice. These filaments were capable of reverting to rods that could invade other BECs. Hence, under growth conditions established to resemble those present in vivo, the elements of the proposed uropathogenic cascade were inducible in a human BEC model system. Here, we describe the model and show how these characteristics are reproduced in vitro.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInfection and Immunity
Vol/bind80
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1858-67
Antal sider10
ISSN0019-9567
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

Fingeraftryk

Coinfection
Epithelial Cells
Uropathogenic Escherichia coli
In Vitro Techniques
Epithelium
Urine
Growth

Citer dette

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title = "Escherichia coli Uropathogenesis In Vitro: Invasion, Cellular Escape, and Secondary Infection Analyzed in a Human Bladder Cell Infection Model",
abstract = "Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are capable of invading bladder epithelial cells (BECs) on the bladder luminal surface. Based primarily on studies in mouse models, invasion is proposed to trigger an intracellular uropathogenic cascade involving intracellular bacterial proliferation followed by escape of elongated, filamentous bacteria from colonized BECs. UPEC filaments on the mouse bladder epithelium are able to revert to rod-shaped bacteria, which are believed to invade neighboring cells to initiate new rounds of intracellular colonization. So far, however, these late-stage infection events have not been replicated in vitro. We have established an in vitro model of human bladder cell infection by the use of a flow chamber (FC)-based culture system, which allows investigation of steps subsequent to initial invasion. Short-term bacterial colonization on the FC-BEC layer led to intracellular colonization. Exposing invaded BECs to a flow of urine, i.e., establishing conditions similar to those faced by UPEC reemerging on the bladder luminal surface, led to outgrowth of filamentous bacteria similar to what has been reported to occur in mice. These filaments were capable of reverting to rods that could invade other BECs. Hence, under growth conditions established to resemble those present in vivo, the elements of the proposed uropathogenic cascade were inducible in a human BEC model system. Here, we describe the model and show how these characteristics are reproduced in vitro.",
author = "Andersen, {Thomas E} and Surabhi Khandige and Michelle Madelung and Jonathan Brewer and Kolmos, {Hans J} and Jakob M{\o}ller-Jensen",
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Escherichia coli Uropathogenesis In Vitro : Invasion, Cellular Escape, and Secondary Infection Analyzed in a Human Bladder Cell Infection Model. / Andersen, Thomas E; Khandige, Surabhi; Madelung, Michelle; Brewer, Jonathan; Kolmos, Hans J; Møller-Jensen, Jakob.

I: Infection and Immunity, Bind 80, Nr. 5, 2012, s. 1858-67.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Escherichia coli Uropathogenesis In Vitro

T2 - Invasion, Cellular Escape, and Secondary Infection Analyzed in a Human Bladder Cell Infection Model

AU - Andersen, Thomas E

AU - Khandige, Surabhi

AU - Madelung, Michelle

AU - Brewer, Jonathan

AU - Kolmos, Hans J

AU - Møller-Jensen, Jakob

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are capable of invading bladder epithelial cells (BECs) on the bladder luminal surface. Based primarily on studies in mouse models, invasion is proposed to trigger an intracellular uropathogenic cascade involving intracellular bacterial proliferation followed by escape of elongated, filamentous bacteria from colonized BECs. UPEC filaments on the mouse bladder epithelium are able to revert to rod-shaped bacteria, which are believed to invade neighboring cells to initiate new rounds of intracellular colonization. So far, however, these late-stage infection events have not been replicated in vitro. We have established an in vitro model of human bladder cell infection by the use of a flow chamber (FC)-based culture system, which allows investigation of steps subsequent to initial invasion. Short-term bacterial colonization on the FC-BEC layer led to intracellular colonization. Exposing invaded BECs to a flow of urine, i.e., establishing conditions similar to those faced by UPEC reemerging on the bladder luminal surface, led to outgrowth of filamentous bacteria similar to what has been reported to occur in mice. These filaments were capable of reverting to rods that could invade other BECs. Hence, under growth conditions established to resemble those present in vivo, the elements of the proposed uropathogenic cascade were inducible in a human BEC model system. Here, we describe the model and show how these characteristics are reproduced in vitro.

AB - Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are capable of invading bladder epithelial cells (BECs) on the bladder luminal surface. Based primarily on studies in mouse models, invasion is proposed to trigger an intracellular uropathogenic cascade involving intracellular bacterial proliferation followed by escape of elongated, filamentous bacteria from colonized BECs. UPEC filaments on the mouse bladder epithelium are able to revert to rod-shaped bacteria, which are believed to invade neighboring cells to initiate new rounds of intracellular colonization. So far, however, these late-stage infection events have not been replicated in vitro. We have established an in vitro model of human bladder cell infection by the use of a flow chamber (FC)-based culture system, which allows investigation of steps subsequent to initial invasion. Short-term bacterial colonization on the FC-BEC layer led to intracellular colonization. Exposing invaded BECs to a flow of urine, i.e., establishing conditions similar to those faced by UPEC reemerging on the bladder luminal surface, led to outgrowth of filamentous bacteria similar to what has been reported to occur in mice. These filaments were capable of reverting to rods that could invade other BECs. Hence, under growth conditions established to resemble those present in vivo, the elements of the proposed uropathogenic cascade were inducible in a human BEC model system. Here, we describe the model and show how these characteristics are reproduced in vitro.

U2 - 10.1128/IAI.06075-11

DO - 10.1128/IAI.06075-11

M3 - Journal article

VL - 80

SP - 1858

EP - 1867

JO - Infection and Immunity

JF - Infection and Immunity

SN - 0019-9567

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ER -