Erratum to: Shock in the emergency department; a 12 year population based cohort study

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Background: The knowledge of the frequency and associated mortality of shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, all-cause mortality and factors associated with death among patients suffering shock in the ED. Methods: Population-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. All patients aged =18 years living in the hospital catchment area with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1553) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤100 mmHg)) and =1 organ failures. Outcomes were annual incidence per 100,000 person-years at risk (pyar), all-cause mortality at 0-7, and 8-90 days and risk factors associated with death. Results: We identified 1553 of 438,191 (0.4%) ED patients with shock at arrival. Incidence of shock increased from 53.6-74.8 cases per 100,000 pyar. The 7-day, and 90-day mortality was 23.3% (95% CI: 21.2-25.4) and 41.1% (95% CI: 38.6-43.5), respectively. Independent predictors of 7-day mortality were: age (adjusted HR 1.03 (95% CI: 1.03-1.04), and number of organ failures (≥3 organ failures; adjusted HR 3.30 95% CI: 2.33-4.66). Age, comorbidity level and number of organ failure were associated with 90-day mortality. Conclusion: Shock is a frequent and critical finding in the ED, carrying a 7- and, 90- day mortality of 23.3% and 41.1%, respectively. Age and number of organ failures are independent prognostic factors for death within 7 days, whereas age, comorbidity and organ failures are of significance within 8-90 days.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer103
TidsskriftScandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Vol/bind25
Antal sider12
ISSN1757-7241
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 25. okt. 2017

Fingeraftryk

Hospital Emergency Service
Cohort Studies
Population
Comorbidity
Incidence
Hospital Departments
Denmark

Citer dette

@article{3a05ffd729bd4cc3adc41e573b383e94,
title = "Erratum to: Shock in the emergency department; a 12 year population based cohort study",
abstract = "Background: The knowledge of the frequency and associated mortality of shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, all-cause mortality and factors associated with death among patients suffering shock in the ED. Methods: Population-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. All patients aged =18 years living in the hospital catchment area with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1553) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤100 mmHg)) and =1 organ failures. Outcomes were annual incidence per 100,000 person-years at risk (pyar), all-cause mortality at 0-7, and 8-90 days and risk factors associated with death. Results: We identified 1553 of 438,191 (0.4{\%}) ED patients with shock at arrival. Incidence of shock increased from 53.6-74.8 cases per 100,000 pyar. The 7-day, and 90-day mortality was 23.3{\%} (95{\%} CI: 21.2-25.4) and 41.1{\%} (95{\%} CI: 38.6-43.5), respectively. Independent predictors of 7-day mortality were: age (adjusted HR 1.03 (95{\%} CI: 1.03-1.04), and number of organ failures (≥3 organ failures; adjusted HR 3.30 95{\%} CI: 2.33-4.66). Age, comorbidity level and number of organ failure were associated with 90-day mortality. Conclusion: Shock is a frequent and critical finding in the ED, carrying a 7- and, 90- day mortality of 23.3{\%} and 41.1{\%}, respectively. Age and number of organ failures are independent prognostic factors for death within 7 days, whereas age, comorbidity and organ failures are of significance within 8-90 days.",
keywords = "Published Erratum",
author = "Holler, {Jon Gitz} and Henriksen, {Daniel Pilsgaard} and S{\o}ren Mikkelsen and Rasmussen, {Lars Melholt} and Court Pedersen and Lassen, {Annmarie Touborg}",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1186/s13049-017-0429-2",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine",
issn = "1757-7241",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Erratum to

T2 - Shock in the emergency department; a 12 year population based cohort study

AU - Holler, Jon Gitz

AU - Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard

AU - Mikkelsen, Søren

AU - Rasmussen, Lars Melholt

AU - Pedersen, Court

AU - Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

PY - 2017/10/25

Y1 - 2017/10/25

N2 - Background: The knowledge of the frequency and associated mortality of shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, all-cause mortality and factors associated with death among patients suffering shock in the ED. Methods: Population-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. All patients aged =18 years living in the hospital catchment area with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1553) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤100 mmHg)) and =1 organ failures. Outcomes were annual incidence per 100,000 person-years at risk (pyar), all-cause mortality at 0-7, and 8-90 days and risk factors associated with death. Results: We identified 1553 of 438,191 (0.4%) ED patients with shock at arrival. Incidence of shock increased from 53.6-74.8 cases per 100,000 pyar. The 7-day, and 90-day mortality was 23.3% (95% CI: 21.2-25.4) and 41.1% (95% CI: 38.6-43.5), respectively. Independent predictors of 7-day mortality were: age (adjusted HR 1.03 (95% CI: 1.03-1.04), and number of organ failures (≥3 organ failures; adjusted HR 3.30 95% CI: 2.33-4.66). Age, comorbidity level and number of organ failure were associated with 90-day mortality. Conclusion: Shock is a frequent and critical finding in the ED, carrying a 7- and, 90- day mortality of 23.3% and 41.1%, respectively. Age and number of organ failures are independent prognostic factors for death within 7 days, whereas age, comorbidity and organ failures are of significance within 8-90 days.

AB - Background: The knowledge of the frequency and associated mortality of shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, all-cause mortality and factors associated with death among patients suffering shock in the ED. Methods: Population-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. All patients aged =18 years living in the hospital catchment area with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1553) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤100 mmHg)) and =1 organ failures. Outcomes were annual incidence per 100,000 person-years at risk (pyar), all-cause mortality at 0-7, and 8-90 days and risk factors associated with death. Results: We identified 1553 of 438,191 (0.4%) ED patients with shock at arrival. Incidence of shock increased from 53.6-74.8 cases per 100,000 pyar. The 7-day, and 90-day mortality was 23.3% (95% CI: 21.2-25.4) and 41.1% (95% CI: 38.6-43.5), respectively. Independent predictors of 7-day mortality were: age (adjusted HR 1.03 (95% CI: 1.03-1.04), and number of organ failures (≥3 organ failures; adjusted HR 3.30 95% CI: 2.33-4.66). Age, comorbidity level and number of organ failure were associated with 90-day mortality. Conclusion: Shock is a frequent and critical finding in the ED, carrying a 7- and, 90- day mortality of 23.3% and 41.1%, respectively. Age and number of organ failures are independent prognostic factors for death within 7 days, whereas age, comorbidity and organ failures are of significance within 8-90 days.

KW - Published Erratum

U2 - 10.1186/s13049-017-0429-2

DO - 10.1186/s13049-017-0429-2

M3 - Comment/debate

C2 - 29070046

VL - 25

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine

SN - 1757-7241

M1 - 103

ER -