Epidemiology of chronic red-cell transfusion recipients in Sweden and Denmark–a 10 year follow-up study

Maria Didriksen*, Klaus Rostgaard, Kirsten Grønbæk, Ole B. Pedersen, Kjell Titlestad, Christian Erikstrup, Kaspar R. Nielsen, Gustaf Edgren, Henrik Ullum, Henrik Hjalgrim

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Background and objectives: Chronic red-cell transfusions may be an indispensable part of patient treatment and may require early intervention to avoid adverse transfusion effects. The population of chronic transfusion recipients including common diagnoses and survival remains poorly characterised. Thus, the objective was to examine the complete range of chronic transfusion recipients, including demographic and patient characteristics and survival. Materials and Methods: All patients who received their first transfusion in Sweden or Denmark from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010 were followed up for subsequent transfusion episodes until December 31, 2012. Data on patient characteristics at time of the first and subsequent transfusions were retrieved from the national registers. We estimated the proportion of transfused patients who experienced 20 or more red-cell transfusion episodes (with an episode defined as all transfusions received 4 days or less apart) and characterised this patient population with respect to diagnoses, demographics and survival. Results: Among 893 117 first time red-cell transfusion recipients, 6157 (0·7%) experienced 20 or more episodes in total. The most common diagnoses among these patients were haematologic malignancies followed by non-haematologic malignancies and non-malignant blood and immune system related diseases. On average, chronically transfused patients had a median survival of less than 1 year following their 20th transfusion episode. Conclusion: This study provides an overview of patient characteristics related to repeat red-cell transfusions and of the amount of red-cell transfusion episodes administered during a 10-year period in two countries. Patients who become chronically transfused suffer from diseases with poor prognosis.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftVox Sanguinis
Vol/bind113
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)770-778
ISSN0042-9007
DOI
StatusUdgivet - nov. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Epidemiology
Immune System Diseases
Hematologic Neoplasms
Denmark
Population
Neoplasms

Citer dette

Didriksen, M., Rostgaard, K., Grønbæk, K., Pedersen, O. B., Titlestad, K., Erikstrup, C., ... Hjalgrim, H. (2018). Epidemiology of chronic red-cell transfusion recipients in Sweden and Denmark–a 10 year follow-up study. Vox Sanguinis, 113(8), 770-778. https://doi.org/10.1111/vox.12715
Didriksen, Maria ; Rostgaard, Klaus ; Grønbæk, Kirsten ; Pedersen, Ole B. ; Titlestad, Kjell ; Erikstrup, Christian ; Nielsen, Kaspar R. ; Edgren, Gustaf ; Ullum, Henrik ; Hjalgrim, Henrik. / Epidemiology of chronic red-cell transfusion recipients in Sweden and Denmark–a 10 year follow-up study. I: Vox Sanguinis. 2018 ; Bind 113, Nr. 8. s. 770-778.
@article{9e06c10311e84e81a917b9f5ad838b52,
title = "Epidemiology of chronic red-cell transfusion recipients in Sweden and Denmark–a 10 year follow-up study",
abstract = "Background and objectives: Chronic red-cell transfusions may be an indispensable part of patient treatment and may require early intervention to avoid adverse transfusion effects. The population of chronic transfusion recipients including common diagnoses and survival remains poorly characterised. Thus, the objective was to examine the complete range of chronic transfusion recipients, including demographic and patient characteristics and survival. Materials and Methods: All patients who received their first transfusion in Sweden or Denmark from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010 were followed up for subsequent transfusion episodes until December 31, 2012. Data on patient characteristics at time of the first and subsequent transfusions were retrieved from the national registers. We estimated the proportion of transfused patients who experienced 20 or more red-cell transfusion episodes (with an episode defined as all transfusions received 4 days or less apart) and characterised this patient population with respect to diagnoses, demographics and survival. Results: Among 893 117 first time red-cell transfusion recipients, 6157 (0·7{\%}) experienced 20 or more episodes in total. The most common diagnoses among these patients were haematologic malignancies followed by non-haematologic malignancies and non-malignant blood and immune system related diseases. On average, chronically transfused patients had a median survival of less than 1 year following their 20th transfusion episode. Conclusion: This study provides an overview of patient characteristics related to repeat red-cell transfusions and of the amount of red-cell transfusion episodes administered during a 10-year period in two countries. Patients who become chronically transfused suffer from diseases with poor prognosis.",
keywords = "epidemiology, transfusion medicine (in general), transfusion strategy, transfusion therapy, Transfusion Reaction/epidemiology, Humans, Middle Aged, Child, Preschool, Infant, Sweden, Adolescent, Aged, 80 and over, Denmark, Adult, Female, Aged, Erythrocyte Transfusion/adverse effects, Child, Infant, Newborn",
author = "Maria Didriksen and Klaus Rostgaard and Kirsten Gr{\o}nb{\ae}k and Pedersen, {Ole B.} and Kjell Titlestad and Christian Erikstrup and Nielsen, {Kaspar R.} and Gustaf Edgren and Henrik Ullum and Henrik Hjalgrim",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1111/vox.12715",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
pages = "770--778",
journal = "Vox Sanguinis",
issn = "0042-9007",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "8",

}

Didriksen, M, Rostgaard, K, Grønbæk, K, Pedersen, OB, Titlestad, K, Erikstrup, C, Nielsen, KR, Edgren, G, Ullum, H & Hjalgrim, H 2018, 'Epidemiology of chronic red-cell transfusion recipients in Sweden and Denmark–a 10 year follow-up study', Vox Sanguinis, bind 113, nr. 8, s. 770-778. https://doi.org/10.1111/vox.12715

Epidemiology of chronic red-cell transfusion recipients in Sweden and Denmark–a 10 year follow-up study. / Didriksen, Maria; Rostgaard, Klaus; Grønbæk, Kirsten; Pedersen, Ole B.; Titlestad, Kjell; Erikstrup, Christian; Nielsen, Kaspar R.; Edgren, Gustaf; Ullum, Henrik; Hjalgrim, Henrik.

I: Vox Sanguinis, Bind 113, Nr. 8, 11.2018, s. 770-778.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Epidemiology of chronic red-cell transfusion recipients in Sweden and Denmark–a 10 year follow-up study

AU - Didriksen, Maria

AU - Rostgaard, Klaus

AU - Grønbæk, Kirsten

AU - Pedersen, Ole B.

AU - Titlestad, Kjell

AU - Erikstrup, Christian

AU - Nielsen, Kaspar R.

AU - Edgren, Gustaf

AU - Ullum, Henrik

AU - Hjalgrim, Henrik

PY - 2018/11

Y1 - 2018/11

N2 - Background and objectives: Chronic red-cell transfusions may be an indispensable part of patient treatment and may require early intervention to avoid adverse transfusion effects. The population of chronic transfusion recipients including common diagnoses and survival remains poorly characterised. Thus, the objective was to examine the complete range of chronic transfusion recipients, including demographic and patient characteristics and survival. Materials and Methods: All patients who received their first transfusion in Sweden or Denmark from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010 were followed up for subsequent transfusion episodes until December 31, 2012. Data on patient characteristics at time of the first and subsequent transfusions were retrieved from the national registers. We estimated the proportion of transfused patients who experienced 20 or more red-cell transfusion episodes (with an episode defined as all transfusions received 4 days or less apart) and characterised this patient population with respect to diagnoses, demographics and survival. Results: Among 893 117 first time red-cell transfusion recipients, 6157 (0·7%) experienced 20 or more episodes in total. The most common diagnoses among these patients were haematologic malignancies followed by non-haematologic malignancies and non-malignant blood and immune system related diseases. On average, chronically transfused patients had a median survival of less than 1 year following their 20th transfusion episode. Conclusion: This study provides an overview of patient characteristics related to repeat red-cell transfusions and of the amount of red-cell transfusion episodes administered during a 10-year period in two countries. Patients who become chronically transfused suffer from diseases with poor prognosis.

AB - Background and objectives: Chronic red-cell transfusions may be an indispensable part of patient treatment and may require early intervention to avoid adverse transfusion effects. The population of chronic transfusion recipients including common diagnoses and survival remains poorly characterised. Thus, the objective was to examine the complete range of chronic transfusion recipients, including demographic and patient characteristics and survival. Materials and Methods: All patients who received their first transfusion in Sweden or Denmark from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010 were followed up for subsequent transfusion episodes until December 31, 2012. Data on patient characteristics at time of the first and subsequent transfusions were retrieved from the national registers. We estimated the proportion of transfused patients who experienced 20 or more red-cell transfusion episodes (with an episode defined as all transfusions received 4 days or less apart) and characterised this patient population with respect to diagnoses, demographics and survival. Results: Among 893 117 first time red-cell transfusion recipients, 6157 (0·7%) experienced 20 or more episodes in total. The most common diagnoses among these patients were haematologic malignancies followed by non-haematologic malignancies and non-malignant blood and immune system related diseases. On average, chronically transfused patients had a median survival of less than 1 year following their 20th transfusion episode. Conclusion: This study provides an overview of patient characteristics related to repeat red-cell transfusions and of the amount of red-cell transfusion episodes administered during a 10-year period in two countries. Patients who become chronically transfused suffer from diseases with poor prognosis.

KW - epidemiology

KW - transfusion medicine (in general)

KW - transfusion strategy

KW - transfusion therapy

KW - Transfusion Reaction/epidemiology

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Child, Preschool

KW - Infant

KW - Sweden

KW - Adolescent

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Denmark

KW - Adult

KW - Female

KW - Aged

KW - Erythrocyte Transfusion/adverse effects

KW - Child

KW - Infant, Newborn

U2 - 10.1111/vox.12715

DO - 10.1111/vox.12715

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30270539

AN - SCOPUS:85054186023

VL - 113

SP - 770

EP - 778

JO - Vox Sanguinis

JF - Vox Sanguinis

SN - 0042-9007

IS - 8

ER -