Empowering Disgust: Redefining Alternative Postpartum Placenta Practices

Elizabeth Dickenson, Karen A. Foss, Charlotte Kroløkke

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This article examines communication practices surrounding the unconventional yet emerging trend of postpartum placenta use: eating, encapsulating, or burying the human placenta. Through interviews with both supporters and nonsupporters of postpartum placenta practices, we explore conceptualizations of placenta consumption and burial within larger mothering, childbirth, and postpartum rhetorics. We argue that placenta practices function rhetorically within a core frame of disgust, which both supporters and nonsupporters initially use to respond to placenta use. Yet supporters rearticulate the literal meaning of disgust to create an empowering rhetorical frame from which to view placenta practices and motherhood. In effect, supporters reframe the meaning of disgust toward the mainstream Western medicalization of birth in order to position placenta practices, natural childbirth, and mothering as empowering.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftWomen's Studies in Communication
Vol/bind40
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)111-128
ISSN0749-1409
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Communication
medicalization
motherhood
eating behavior
funeral
rhetoric
communication
trend
interview

Citer dette

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Empowering Disgust : Redefining Alternative Postpartum Placenta Practices . / Dickenson, Elizabeth; Foss, Karen A.; Kroløkke, Charlotte.

I: Women's Studies in Communication, Bind 40, Nr. 1, 2017, s. 111-128.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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