Embryonic stem cell transplantation after experimental traumatic brain injury dramatically improves neurological outcome, but may cause tumors

Peter Riess, Marek Molcanyi, Kristine Bentz, Mark Maegele, Christian Simanski, Christoph Carlitscheck, Annette Schneider, Jürgen Hescheler, Bertil Bouillon, Ute Schäfer, Edmund Neugebauer

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jan
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Neurotrauma
Vol/bind24
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)216-25
Antal sider9
ISSN0897-7151
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. jan. 2007
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Neoplasms
Rotarod Performance Test
Percussion
Recovery of Function
Wounds and Injuries
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Nervous System
Sprague Dawley Rats
Observation
Safety

Citer dette

Riess, Peter ; Molcanyi, Marek ; Bentz, Kristine ; Maegele, Mark ; Simanski, Christian ; Carlitscheck, Christoph ; Schneider, Annette ; Hescheler, Jürgen ; Bouillon, Bertil ; Schäfer, Ute ; Neugebauer, Edmund. / Embryonic stem cell transplantation after experimental traumatic brain injury dramatically improves neurological outcome, but may cause tumors. I: Journal of Neurotrauma. 2007 ; Bind 24, Nr. 1. s. 216-25.
@article{4bcc33b0707211de9c46000ea68e967b,
title = "Embryonic stem cell transplantation after experimental traumatic brain injury dramatically improves neurological outcome, but may cause tumors",
abstract = "Transplantation of embryonic stem (ES) cells may provide cures for the damaged nervous system. Pre-differentiated ES or neuronal precursor cells have been investigated in various animal models of neurodegenerative diseases including traumatic brain injury (TBI). To our knowledge, no study has yet examined the effects of undifferentiated, murine ES cells on functional recovery and tumorigenity following implantation into injured rat brains. We evaluated the effect of transplantation of undifferentiated, murine embryonic cells on the recovery of motor function following lateral fluid percussion brain injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 3 days post-injury, animals received stereotactic injections of either embryonic stem cell suspension or injections of phosphate buffered saline without cells (control) into the injured cortex. Neurological motor function assessments were performed before injury, 72 h, 1, 3, and 6 weeks after transplantation using a Rotatrod and a Composite Neuroscore test. During this time period brain injured animals receiving ES cell transplantation showed a significant improvement in the Rotarod Test and in the Composite Neuroscore Test as compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-treated animals. At 1 week post-transplantation, ES cells were detectable in 100{\%} of transplanted animals. At 7 weeks following transplantation, EScells were detectable in only one animal. Two of 10 xenotransplanted animals revealed tumor formation over the observation period. These findings provide evidence for therapeutic potency of embryonic stem cell transplantation after TBI in rat, but also raise serious safety concerns about the use of such cells in human.",
author = "Peter Riess and Marek Molcanyi and Kristine Bentz and Mark Maegele and Christian Simanski and Christoph Carlitscheck and Annette Schneider and J{\"u}rgen Hescheler and Bertil Bouillon and Ute Sch{\"a}fer and Edmund Neugebauer",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/neu.2006.0141",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "216--25",
journal = "Journal of Neurotrauma",
issn = "0897-7151",
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Riess, P, Molcanyi, M, Bentz, K, Maegele, M, Simanski, C, Carlitscheck, C, Schneider, A, Hescheler, J, Bouillon, B, Schäfer, U & Neugebauer, E 2007, 'Embryonic stem cell transplantation after experimental traumatic brain injury dramatically improves neurological outcome, but may cause tumors', Journal of Neurotrauma, bind 24, nr. 1, s. 216-25. https://doi.org/10.1089/neu.2006.0141

Embryonic stem cell transplantation after experimental traumatic brain injury dramatically improves neurological outcome, but may cause tumors. / Riess, Peter; Molcanyi, Marek; Bentz, Kristine; Maegele, Mark; Simanski, Christian; Carlitscheck, Christoph; Schneider, Annette; Hescheler, Jürgen; Bouillon, Bertil; Schäfer, Ute; Neugebauer, Edmund.

I: Journal of Neurotrauma, Bind 24, Nr. 1, 01.01.2007, s. 216-25.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Embryonic stem cell transplantation after experimental traumatic brain injury dramatically improves neurological outcome, but may cause tumors

AU - Riess, Peter

AU - Molcanyi, Marek

AU - Bentz, Kristine

AU - Maegele, Mark

AU - Simanski, Christian

AU - Carlitscheck, Christoph

AU - Schneider, Annette

AU - Hescheler, Jürgen

AU - Bouillon, Bertil

AU - Schäfer, Ute

AU - Neugebauer, Edmund

PY - 2007/1/1

Y1 - 2007/1/1

N2 - Transplantation of embryonic stem (ES) cells may provide cures for the damaged nervous system. Pre-differentiated ES or neuronal precursor cells have been investigated in various animal models of neurodegenerative diseases including traumatic brain injury (TBI). To our knowledge, no study has yet examined the effects of undifferentiated, murine ES cells on functional recovery and tumorigenity following implantation into injured rat brains. We evaluated the effect of transplantation of undifferentiated, murine embryonic cells on the recovery of motor function following lateral fluid percussion brain injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 3 days post-injury, animals received stereotactic injections of either embryonic stem cell suspension or injections of phosphate buffered saline without cells (control) into the injured cortex. Neurological motor function assessments were performed before injury, 72 h, 1, 3, and 6 weeks after transplantation using a Rotatrod and a Composite Neuroscore test. During this time period brain injured animals receiving ES cell transplantation showed a significant improvement in the Rotarod Test and in the Composite Neuroscore Test as compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-treated animals. At 1 week post-transplantation, ES cells were detectable in 100% of transplanted animals. At 7 weeks following transplantation, EScells were detectable in only one animal. Two of 10 xenotransplanted animals revealed tumor formation over the observation period. These findings provide evidence for therapeutic potency of embryonic stem cell transplantation after TBI in rat, but also raise serious safety concerns about the use of such cells in human.

AB - Transplantation of embryonic stem (ES) cells may provide cures for the damaged nervous system. Pre-differentiated ES or neuronal precursor cells have been investigated in various animal models of neurodegenerative diseases including traumatic brain injury (TBI). To our knowledge, no study has yet examined the effects of undifferentiated, murine ES cells on functional recovery and tumorigenity following implantation into injured rat brains. We evaluated the effect of transplantation of undifferentiated, murine embryonic cells on the recovery of motor function following lateral fluid percussion brain injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 3 days post-injury, animals received stereotactic injections of either embryonic stem cell suspension or injections of phosphate buffered saline without cells (control) into the injured cortex. Neurological motor function assessments were performed before injury, 72 h, 1, 3, and 6 weeks after transplantation using a Rotatrod and a Composite Neuroscore test. During this time period brain injured animals receiving ES cell transplantation showed a significant improvement in the Rotarod Test and in the Composite Neuroscore Test as compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-treated animals. At 1 week post-transplantation, ES cells were detectable in 100% of transplanted animals. At 7 weeks following transplantation, EScells were detectable in only one animal. Two of 10 xenotransplanted animals revealed tumor formation over the observation period. These findings provide evidence for therapeutic potency of embryonic stem cell transplantation after TBI in rat, but also raise serious safety concerns about the use of such cells in human.

U2 - 10.1089/neu.2006.0141

DO - 10.1089/neu.2006.0141

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 17263685

VL - 24

SP - 216

EP - 225

JO - Journal of Neurotrauma

JF - Journal of Neurotrauma

SN - 0897-7151

IS - 1

ER -