Elderly alcoholics compared to middle-aged alcoholics in outpatient treatment - 6-month follow-up

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Purpose: This study examined 6-month drinking outcomes of elderly patients compared with middle-aged patients in a clinical sample after initiation of outpatient treatment for alcoholism. Materials and methods: In a clinical prospective cohort study, 1398 consecutive patients from a municipality outpatient alcohol clinic were included. A total of 208 elderly patients aged from 60 to 82 years and 1190 middle-aged patients from 40 to 59 years participated in the study. The following psychosocial treatment interventions were offered: cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy and supportive consultations. Using an ‘intention-to-treat’ method, primary outcomes included drinking outcomes (self-reported abstinence rates, drinking 3 drinks or less per day, and change in Addiction Severity Index [ASI] composite scores) during the 30 days prior to 6-month follow-up; secondary outcome was compliance to the recommended treatment. Results: Compared to middle-aged, among elderly patients a higher proportion were females (33.5% vs. 42.8%) and had a lower family/social ASI-composite score (0.17 vs. 0.12) at baseline. Higher alcohol and family/social ASI-composite scores were inversely correlated with abstinence. Elderly patients had a higher chance for abstinence compared to middle-aged patients (Odds ratio 95% [confidence interval]) 1.40 (1.03–1.92). The proportion of elderly patients that drank 3 or less drinks per day was 17.8%, compared to 10.8% among middle-aged (p <.01). Finally, elderly patients obtained a higher compliance, which was similarly associated with abstinence (OR =2.46 (1.95–3.11)). Discussion and conclusions: Elderly patients, who receive psychosocial outpatient treatment for alcoholism, have better 6-month outcomes within a range of drinking outcome measures compared to middle-aged patients.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftNordic Journal of Psychiatry
Vol/bind72
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)506-511
ISSN0803-9488
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 23. okt. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Alcoholics
Outpatients
Drinking
Alcoholism
Alcohols
Family Therapy
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Compliance
Cohort Studies
Referral and Consultation
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals

Citer dette

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title = "Elderly alcoholics compared to middle-aged alcoholics in outpatient treatment - 6-month follow-up",
abstract = "Purpose: This study examined 6-month drinking outcomes of elderly patients compared with middle-aged patients in a clinical sample after initiation of outpatient treatment for alcoholism. Materials and methods: In a clinical prospective cohort study, 1398 consecutive patients from a municipality outpatient alcohol clinic were included. A total of 208 elderly patients aged from 60 to 82 years and 1190 middle-aged patients from 40 to 59 years participated in the study. The following psychosocial treatment interventions were offered: cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy and supportive consultations. Using an ‘intention-to-treat’ method, primary outcomes included drinking outcomes (self-reported abstinence rates, drinking 3 drinks or less per day, and change in Addiction Severity Index [ASI] composite scores) during the 30 days prior to 6-month follow-up; secondary outcome was compliance to the recommended treatment. Results: Compared to middle-aged, among elderly patients a higher proportion were females (33.5{\%} vs. 42.8{\%}) and had a lower family/social ASI-composite score (0.17 vs. 0.12) at baseline. Higher alcohol and family/social ASI-composite scores were inversely correlated with abstinence. Elderly patients had a higher chance for abstinence compared to middle-aged patients (Odds ratio 95{\%} [confidence interval]) 1.40 (1.03–1.92). The proportion of elderly patients that drank 3 or less drinks per day was 17.8{\%}, compared to 10.8{\%} among middle-aged (p <.01). Finally, elderly patients obtained a higher compliance, which was similarly associated with abstinence (OR =2.46 (1.95–3.11)). Discussion and conclusions: Elderly patients, who receive psychosocial outpatient treatment for alcoholism, have better 6-month outcomes within a range of drinking outcome measures compared to middle-aged patients.",
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author = "Wieben, {Emilie Sylvest} and Bent Nielsen and Nielsen, {Anette S{\o}gaard} and Kjeld Andersen",
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Elderly alcoholics compared to middle-aged alcoholics in outpatient treatment - 6-month follow-up. / Wieben, Emilie Sylvest; Nielsen, Bent; Nielsen, Anette Søgaard; Andersen, Kjeld.

I: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, Bind 72, Nr. 7, 23.10.2018, s. 506-511.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Elderly alcoholics compared to middle-aged alcoholics in outpatient treatment - 6-month follow-up

AU - Wieben, Emilie Sylvest

AU - Nielsen, Bent

AU - Nielsen, Anette Søgaard

AU - Andersen, Kjeld

PY - 2018/10/23

Y1 - 2018/10/23

N2 - Purpose: This study examined 6-month drinking outcomes of elderly patients compared with middle-aged patients in a clinical sample after initiation of outpatient treatment for alcoholism. Materials and methods: In a clinical prospective cohort study, 1398 consecutive patients from a municipality outpatient alcohol clinic were included. A total of 208 elderly patients aged from 60 to 82 years and 1190 middle-aged patients from 40 to 59 years participated in the study. The following psychosocial treatment interventions were offered: cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy and supportive consultations. Using an ‘intention-to-treat’ method, primary outcomes included drinking outcomes (self-reported abstinence rates, drinking 3 drinks or less per day, and change in Addiction Severity Index [ASI] composite scores) during the 30 days prior to 6-month follow-up; secondary outcome was compliance to the recommended treatment. Results: Compared to middle-aged, among elderly patients a higher proportion were females (33.5% vs. 42.8%) and had a lower family/social ASI-composite score (0.17 vs. 0.12) at baseline. Higher alcohol and family/social ASI-composite scores were inversely correlated with abstinence. Elderly patients had a higher chance for abstinence compared to middle-aged patients (Odds ratio 95% [confidence interval]) 1.40 (1.03–1.92). The proportion of elderly patients that drank 3 or less drinks per day was 17.8%, compared to 10.8% among middle-aged (p <.01). Finally, elderly patients obtained a higher compliance, which was similarly associated with abstinence (OR =2.46 (1.95–3.11)). Discussion and conclusions: Elderly patients, who receive psychosocial outpatient treatment for alcoholism, have better 6-month outcomes within a range of drinking outcome measures compared to middle-aged patients.

AB - Purpose: This study examined 6-month drinking outcomes of elderly patients compared with middle-aged patients in a clinical sample after initiation of outpatient treatment for alcoholism. Materials and methods: In a clinical prospective cohort study, 1398 consecutive patients from a municipality outpatient alcohol clinic were included. A total of 208 elderly patients aged from 60 to 82 years and 1190 middle-aged patients from 40 to 59 years participated in the study. The following psychosocial treatment interventions were offered: cognitive behavioral therapy, family therapy and supportive consultations. Using an ‘intention-to-treat’ method, primary outcomes included drinking outcomes (self-reported abstinence rates, drinking 3 drinks or less per day, and change in Addiction Severity Index [ASI] composite scores) during the 30 days prior to 6-month follow-up; secondary outcome was compliance to the recommended treatment. Results: Compared to middle-aged, among elderly patients a higher proportion were females (33.5% vs. 42.8%) and had a lower family/social ASI-composite score (0.17 vs. 0.12) at baseline. Higher alcohol and family/social ASI-composite scores were inversely correlated with abstinence. Elderly patients had a higher chance for abstinence compared to middle-aged patients (Odds ratio 95% [confidence interval]) 1.40 (1.03–1.92). The proportion of elderly patients that drank 3 or less drinks per day was 17.8%, compared to 10.8% among middle-aged (p <.01). Finally, elderly patients obtained a higher compliance, which was similarly associated with abstinence (OR =2.46 (1.95–3.11)). Discussion and conclusions: Elderly patients, who receive psychosocial outpatient treatment for alcoholism, have better 6-month outcomes within a range of drinking outcome measures compared to middle-aged patients.

KW - Alcoholism

KW - alcohol

KW - elderly

KW - middle-aged

KW - outpatient treatment

U2 - 10.1080/08039488.2018.1522373

DO - 10.1080/08039488.2018.1522373

M3 - Journal article

VL - 72

SP - 506

EP - 511

JO - Nordic Journal of Psychiatry

JF - Nordic Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0803-9488

IS - 7

ER -