Effects of mechanical planting on establishment and early growth of willow

Stina Edelfeldt*, Theo Verwijst, Anneli Lundkvist, Johannes Forkman

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Commercial willow planting is mostly performed by machines, using long rods which are automatically pressed in the soil and cut. This procedure exerts a large mechanical impact on the cuttings, and may lead to damage, especially when planted in compacted soils. We studied cuttings and early growth performance of willow (in terms of produced shoot biomass, shoot height, leaf area, and number of shoots per cutting) after machine planting, in comparison to manually prepared and planted cuttings. To isolate the effect of mechanical planting from the effects of field variation after planting, we dug out cuttings from five different clones directly after machine planting in well prepared and compacted soil respectively and grew them under controlled conditions, together with a manually prepared control. We found that undamaged cuttings had a better growth performance than visibly damaged cuttings. Planting by machine on compacted soil resulted in a relatively large number of cuttings landing on the soil surface, instead of being planted vertically in the soil. Soil compaction and machine planting interacted with cutting dimensions, the poorer performance of thinner cuttings being more pronounced in compacted soil. To obtain a faster and more even establishment of willows, we recommend thorough soil cultivation prior to planting, further development of planting machines to minimize damage to cuttings at planting, and the use of cuttings with a diameter of at least 10-11mm.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBiomass and Bioenergy
Vol/bind55
Sider (fra-til)234-242
Antal sider9
ISSN0961-9534
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2013
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

planting
Soils
compacted soils
soil
shoot
shoots
effect
cutting (process)
growth performance
damage
soil compaction
Landing
leaf area
clone
tillage
Biomass
soil surface
Compaction
clones
biomass

Citer dette

Edelfeldt, Stina ; Verwijst, Theo ; Lundkvist, Anneli ; Forkman, Johannes. / Effects of mechanical planting on establishment and early growth of willow. I: Biomass and Bioenergy. 2013 ; Bind 55. s. 234-242.
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abstract = "Commercial willow planting is mostly performed by machines, using long rods which are automatically pressed in the soil and cut. This procedure exerts a large mechanical impact on the cuttings, and may lead to damage, especially when planted in compacted soils. We studied cuttings and early growth performance of willow (in terms of produced shoot biomass, shoot height, leaf area, and number of shoots per cutting) after machine planting, in comparison to manually prepared and planted cuttings. To isolate the effect of mechanical planting from the effects of field variation after planting, we dug out cuttings from five different clones directly after machine planting in well prepared and compacted soil respectively and grew them under controlled conditions, together with a manually prepared control. We found that undamaged cuttings had a better growth performance than visibly damaged cuttings. Planting by machine on compacted soil resulted in a relatively large number of cuttings landing on the soil surface, instead of being planted vertically in the soil. Soil compaction and machine planting interacted with cutting dimensions, the poorer performance of thinner cuttings being more pronounced in compacted soil. To obtain a faster and more even establishment of willows, we recommend thorough soil cultivation prior to planting, further development of planting machines to minimize damage to cuttings at planting, and the use of cuttings with a diameter of at least 10-11mm.",
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Effects of mechanical planting on establishment and early growth of willow. / Edelfeldt, Stina; Verwijst, Theo; Lundkvist, Anneli; Forkman, Johannes.

I: Biomass and Bioenergy, Bind 55, 2013, s. 234-242.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of mechanical planting on establishment and early growth of willow

AU - Edelfeldt, Stina

AU - Verwijst, Theo

AU - Lundkvist, Anneli

AU - Forkman, Johannes

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Commercial willow planting is mostly performed by machines, using long rods which are automatically pressed in the soil and cut. This procedure exerts a large mechanical impact on the cuttings, and may lead to damage, especially when planted in compacted soils. We studied cuttings and early growth performance of willow (in terms of produced shoot biomass, shoot height, leaf area, and number of shoots per cutting) after machine planting, in comparison to manually prepared and planted cuttings. To isolate the effect of mechanical planting from the effects of field variation after planting, we dug out cuttings from five different clones directly after machine planting in well prepared and compacted soil respectively and grew them under controlled conditions, together with a manually prepared control. We found that undamaged cuttings had a better growth performance than visibly damaged cuttings. Planting by machine on compacted soil resulted in a relatively large number of cuttings landing on the soil surface, instead of being planted vertically in the soil. Soil compaction and machine planting interacted with cutting dimensions, the poorer performance of thinner cuttings being more pronounced in compacted soil. To obtain a faster and more even establishment of willows, we recommend thorough soil cultivation prior to planting, further development of planting machines to minimize damage to cuttings at planting, and the use of cuttings with a diameter of at least 10-11mm.

AB - Commercial willow planting is mostly performed by machines, using long rods which are automatically pressed in the soil and cut. This procedure exerts a large mechanical impact on the cuttings, and may lead to damage, especially when planted in compacted soils. We studied cuttings and early growth performance of willow (in terms of produced shoot biomass, shoot height, leaf area, and number of shoots per cutting) after machine planting, in comparison to manually prepared and planted cuttings. To isolate the effect of mechanical planting from the effects of field variation after planting, we dug out cuttings from five different clones directly after machine planting in well prepared and compacted soil respectively and grew them under controlled conditions, together with a manually prepared control. We found that undamaged cuttings had a better growth performance than visibly damaged cuttings. Planting by machine on compacted soil resulted in a relatively large number of cuttings landing on the soil surface, instead of being planted vertically in the soil. Soil compaction and machine planting interacted with cutting dimensions, the poorer performance of thinner cuttings being more pronounced in compacted soil. To obtain a faster and more even establishment of willows, we recommend thorough soil cultivation prior to planting, further development of planting machines to minimize damage to cuttings at planting, and the use of cuttings with a diameter of at least 10-11mm.

KW - Cuttings

KW - Planting machine

KW - Pre-emergence variation

KW - Salix

KW - Short rotation coppice

U2 - 10.1016/j.biombioe.2013.02.018

DO - 10.1016/j.biombioe.2013.02.018

M3 - Journal article

VL - 55

SP - 234

EP - 242

JO - Biomass & Bioenergy

JF - Biomass & Bioenergy

SN - 0961-9534

ER -