Education and the risk for Alzheimers disease: sex makes a difference. EURODEM pooled analyses

L Letenneur, L J Launer, K Andersen, M E Dewey, A Ott, J R Copeland, J F Dartigues, P Kragh-Sorensen, M Baldereschi, C Brayne, A Lobo, J M Martinez-Lage, T Stijnen, A Hofman

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The hypothesis that a low educational level increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. The authors studied the association of years of schooling with the risk for incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease by using pooled data from four European population-based follow-up studies. Dementia cases were identified in a two-stage procedure that included a detailed diagnostic assessment of screen-positive subjects. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease were diagnosed by using international research criteria. Educational level was categorized by years of schooling as low (<or =7), middle (8-11), or high (> or =12). Relative risks (95% confidence intervals) were estimated by using Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, study center, smoking status, and self-reported myocardial infarction and stroke. There were 493 (328) incident cases of dementia (Alzheimer's disease) and 28,061 (27,839) person-years of follow-up. Compared with women with a high level of education, those with low and middle levels of education had 4.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.5, 11.9) and 2.6 (95% confidence interval: 1.0, 7.1) times increased risks, respectively, for Alzheimer's disease. The risk estimates for men were close to 1.0. Finding an association of education with Alzheimer's disease for women only raises the possibility that unmeasured confounding explains the previously reported increased risk for Alzheimer's disease for persons with low levels of education.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Vol/bind151
Udgave nummer11
Sider (fra-til)1064-1071
ISSN0002-9262
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2000

Fingeraftryk

Alzheimer Disease
Education
Confidence Intervals
Smoking
Research
Population

Citer dette

Letenneur, L ; Launer, L J ; Andersen, K ; Dewey, M E ; Ott, A ; Copeland, J R ; Dartigues, J F ; Kragh-Sorensen, P ; Baldereschi, M ; Brayne, C ; Lobo, A ; Martinez-Lage, J M ; Stijnen, T ; Hofman, A. / Education and the risk for Alzheimers disease : sex makes a difference. EURODEM pooled analyses. I: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2000 ; Bind 151, Nr. 11. s. 1064-1071.
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abstract = "The hypothesis that a low educational level increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. The authors studied the association of years of schooling with the risk for incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease by using pooled data from four European population-based follow-up studies. Dementia cases were identified in a two-stage procedure that included a detailed diagnostic assessment of screen-positive subjects. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease were diagnosed by using international research criteria. Educational level was categorized by years of schooling as low ( or =12). Relative risks (95{\%} confidence intervals) were estimated by using Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, study center, smoking status, and self-reported myocardial infarction and stroke. There were 493 (328) incident cases of dementia (Alzheimer's disease) and 28,061 (27,839) person-years of follow-up. Compared with women with a high level of education, those with low and middle levels of education had 4.3 (95{\%} confidence interval: 1.5, 11.9) and 2.6 (95{\%} confidence interval: 1.0, 7.1) times increased risks, respectively, for Alzheimer's disease. The risk estimates for men were close to 1.0. Finding an association of education with Alzheimer's disease for women only raises the possibility that unmeasured confounding explains the previously reported increased risk for Alzheimer's disease for persons with low levels of education.",
author = "L Letenneur and Launer, {L J} and K Andersen and Dewey, {M E} and A Ott and Copeland, {J R} and Dartigues, {J F} and P Kragh-Sorensen and M Baldereschi and C Brayne and A Lobo and Martinez-Lage, {J M} and T Stijnen and A Hofman",
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Letenneur, L, Launer, LJ, Andersen, K, Dewey, ME, Ott, A, Copeland, JR, Dartigues, JF, Kragh-Sorensen, P, Baldereschi, M, Brayne, C, Lobo, A, Martinez-Lage, JM, Stijnen, T & Hofman, A 2000, 'Education and the risk for Alzheimers disease: sex makes a difference. EURODEM pooled analyses', American Journal of Epidemiology, bind 151, nr. 11, s. 1064-1071. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a010149

Education and the risk for Alzheimers disease : sex makes a difference. EURODEM pooled analyses. / Letenneur, L; Launer, L J; Andersen, K; Dewey, M E; Ott, A; Copeland, J R; Dartigues, J F; Kragh-Sorensen, P; Baldereschi, M; Brayne, C; Lobo, A; Martinez-Lage, J M; Stijnen, T; Hofman, A.

I: American Journal of Epidemiology, Bind 151, Nr. 11, 2000, s. 1064-1071.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Education and the risk for Alzheimers disease

T2 - sex makes a difference. EURODEM pooled analyses

AU - Letenneur, L

AU - Launer, L J

AU - Andersen, K

AU - Dewey, M E

AU - Ott, A

AU - Copeland, J R

AU - Dartigues, J F

AU - Kragh-Sorensen, P

AU - Baldereschi, M

AU - Brayne, C

AU - Lobo, A

AU - Martinez-Lage, J M

AU - Stijnen, T

AU - Hofman, A

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - The hypothesis that a low educational level increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. The authors studied the association of years of schooling with the risk for incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease by using pooled data from four European population-based follow-up studies. Dementia cases were identified in a two-stage procedure that included a detailed diagnostic assessment of screen-positive subjects. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease were diagnosed by using international research criteria. Educational level was categorized by years of schooling as low ( or =12). Relative risks (95% confidence intervals) were estimated by using Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, study center, smoking status, and self-reported myocardial infarction and stroke. There were 493 (328) incident cases of dementia (Alzheimer's disease) and 28,061 (27,839) person-years of follow-up. Compared with women with a high level of education, those with low and middle levels of education had 4.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.5, 11.9) and 2.6 (95% confidence interval: 1.0, 7.1) times increased risks, respectively, for Alzheimer's disease. The risk estimates for men were close to 1.0. Finding an association of education with Alzheimer's disease for women only raises the possibility that unmeasured confounding explains the previously reported increased risk for Alzheimer's disease for persons with low levels of education.

AB - The hypothesis that a low educational level increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. The authors studied the association of years of schooling with the risk for incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease by using pooled data from four European population-based follow-up studies. Dementia cases were identified in a two-stage procedure that included a detailed diagnostic assessment of screen-positive subjects. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease were diagnosed by using international research criteria. Educational level was categorized by years of schooling as low ( or =12). Relative risks (95% confidence intervals) were estimated by using Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, study center, smoking status, and self-reported myocardial infarction and stroke. There were 493 (328) incident cases of dementia (Alzheimer's disease) and 28,061 (27,839) person-years of follow-up. Compared with women with a high level of education, those with low and middle levels of education had 4.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.5, 11.9) and 2.6 (95% confidence interval: 1.0, 7.1) times increased risks, respectively, for Alzheimer's disease. The risk estimates for men were close to 1.0. Finding an association of education with Alzheimer's disease for women only raises the possibility that unmeasured confounding explains the previously reported increased risk for Alzheimer's disease for persons with low levels of education.

U2 - 10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a010149

DO - 10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a010149

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 10873130

VL - 151

SP - 1064

EP - 1071

JO - American Journal of Epidemiology

JF - American Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0002-9262

IS - 11

ER -