Economic poverty among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries

Lene Povlsen, Susann Regber, Elisabeth Fosse, Leena Eklund Karlsson, Hildur Gunnarsdottir

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Aims: This study aimed to identify applied definitions and measurements of economic poverty and to explore the proportions and characteristics of children and adolescents living in economic poverty in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden during the last decade and to compare various statistics between the Nordic countries. Methods: Official data from central national authorities on statistics, national reports and European Union Statistics of income and living conditions data were collected and analysed during 2015–2016. Results: The proportion of Nordic children living in economic poverty in 2014 ranged from 9.4% in Norway to 18.5% in Sweden. Compared with the European Union average, from 2004 to 2014 Nordic families with dependent children experienced fewer difficulties in making their money last, even though Icelandic families reported considerable difficulties. The characteristics of children living in economic poverty proved to be similar in the five countries and were related to their parents’ level of education and employment, single-parent households and – in Denmark, Norway and Sweden – to immigrant background. In Finland, poverty among children was linked in particular to low income in employed households. Conclusions: This study showed that economic poverty among Nordic families with dependent children has increased during the latest decade, but it also showed that poverty rates are not necessarily connected to families’ ability to make their money last. Therefore additional studies are needed to explore existing policies and political commitments in the Nordic countries to compensate families with dependent children living in poverty.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftScandinavian Journal of Public Health
Vol/bind46
Udgave nummerSuppl. 20
Sider (fra-til)30-37
ISSN1403-4948
DOI
StatusUdgivet - feb. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Norway
European Union
Denmark
Finland
Single Parent
Iceland
Parents
Education

Citer dette

Povlsen, Lene ; Regber, Susann ; Fosse, Elisabeth ; Eklund Karlsson, Leena ; Gunnarsdottir, Hildur. / Economic poverty among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries. I: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2018 ; Bind 46, Nr. Suppl. 20. s. 30-37.
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Economic poverty among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries. / Povlsen, Lene; Regber, Susann; Fosse, Elisabeth; Eklund Karlsson, Leena; Gunnarsdottir, Hildur.

I: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, Bind 46, Nr. Suppl. 20, 02.2018, s. 30-37.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Economic poverty among children and adolescents in the Nordic countries

AU - Povlsen, Lene

AU - Regber, Susann

AU - Fosse, Elisabeth

AU - Eklund Karlsson, Leena

AU - Gunnarsdottir, Hildur

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - Aims: This study aimed to identify applied definitions and measurements of economic poverty and to explore the proportions and characteristics of children and adolescents living in economic poverty in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden during the last decade and to compare various statistics between the Nordic countries. Methods: Official data from central national authorities on statistics, national reports and European Union Statistics of income and living conditions data were collected and analysed during 2015–2016. Results: The proportion of Nordic children living in economic poverty in 2014 ranged from 9.4% in Norway to 18.5% in Sweden. Compared with the European Union average, from 2004 to 2014 Nordic families with dependent children experienced fewer difficulties in making their money last, even though Icelandic families reported considerable difficulties. The characteristics of children living in economic poverty proved to be similar in the five countries and were related to their parents’ level of education and employment, single-parent households and – in Denmark, Norway and Sweden – to immigrant background. In Finland, poverty among children was linked in particular to low income in employed households. Conclusions: This study showed that economic poverty among Nordic families with dependent children has increased during the latest decade, but it also showed that poverty rates are not necessarily connected to families’ ability to make their money last. Therefore additional studies are needed to explore existing policies and political commitments in the Nordic countries to compensate families with dependent children living in poverty.

AB - Aims: This study aimed to identify applied definitions and measurements of economic poverty and to explore the proportions and characteristics of children and adolescents living in economic poverty in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden during the last decade and to compare various statistics between the Nordic countries. Methods: Official data from central national authorities on statistics, national reports and European Union Statistics of income and living conditions data were collected and analysed during 2015–2016. Results: The proportion of Nordic children living in economic poverty in 2014 ranged from 9.4% in Norway to 18.5% in Sweden. Compared with the European Union average, from 2004 to 2014 Nordic families with dependent children experienced fewer difficulties in making their money last, even though Icelandic families reported considerable difficulties. The characteristics of children living in economic poverty proved to be similar in the five countries and were related to their parents’ level of education and employment, single-parent households and – in Denmark, Norway and Sweden – to immigrant background. In Finland, poverty among children was linked in particular to low income in employed households. Conclusions: This study showed that economic poverty among Nordic families with dependent children has increased during the latest decade, but it also showed that poverty rates are not necessarily connected to families’ ability to make their money last. Therefore additional studies are needed to explore existing policies and political commitments in the Nordic countries to compensate families with dependent children living in poverty.

KW - children

KW - Nordic countries

KW - adolescents

KW - economic poverty

KW - social inequality

KW - children's rights

KW - Children

KW - children’s rights

KW - Poverty/statistics & numerical data

KW - Humans

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Child, Preschool

KW - Infant

KW - Scandinavian and Nordic Countries

KW - Young Adult

KW - Adolescent

KW - Child

KW - Infant, Newborn

U2 - 10.1177/1403494817743894

DO - 10.1177/1403494817743894

M3 - Journal article

VL - 46

SP - 30

EP - 37

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

SN - 1403-4948

IS - Suppl. 20

ER -