Early life chronic inflammatory conditions predict low back pain in adolescence and young adulthood

Amber M. Beynon*, Jeffrey J. Hebert, Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde, Darren J. Beales, Angela Jacques, Bruce F. Walker

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Abstrakt

Background: Associations between inflammatory conditions and low back pain (LBP) have been found frequently in older populations. However, the nature of these relationships in younger populations is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the associations between early life chronic or recurrent inflammatory conditions and impactful LBP in adolescence and young adulthood. Methods: In this longitudinal study, we used data from the Raine Study Gen2 participants at the 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 14, 17, 20 and 22-year follow-ups (N = 2,868). Data were collected on inflammatory conditions from 1 to 22 years of age and occurrences of impactful LBP from 14 to 22 years of age. Longitudinal and cross-sectional associations between inflammatory conditions and impactful LBP occurrence were examined. Potential dose–response relationships between the number of inflammatory conditions and impactful LBP were also assessed. Logistic regression models were used in the analysis. Results: Participants with respiratory or atopic conditions during childhood had increased odds of future impactful LBP in adolescence and young adulthood (odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 1.29 [1.07, 1.54] and 1.23 [1.02, 1.49], respectively). There were cross-sectional associations between inflammatory conditions including respiratory, skin, musculoskeletal, autoimmune and atopic conditions, with impactful LBP. Participants with two illnesses and three or more illnesses had an increased odds (OR [95% CI] =1.68 [1.30, 2.18] and OR [95% CI] =2.12 [1.54, 2.89], respectively) of reporting impactful LBP. Conclusions: Overall, longitudinal and cross-sectional associations of respiratory and atopic conditions with impactful LBP in adolescence and young adulthood were identified. More evidence is needed to determine whether there is a causal relationship between chronic inflammatory conditions and impactful LBP. Significance: Low back pain (LBP) is a prominent and significant health problem and associations between inflammatory conditions and LBP have been found frequently in older populations. We found that children with respiratory or atopic conditions and those with several chronic inflammatory conditions are at increased odds of impactful LBP in adolescence and young adulthood. In clinical practice and future research, there is a need to consider comorbidities also in younger populations.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Pain
Vol/bind25
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)651-658
ISSN1090-3801
DOI
StatusUdgivet - mar. 2021

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