Early anaerobic metabolisms

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Oct-29
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences
Vol/bind361
Udgave nummer1474
Sider (fra-til)1819-1834; discussion 1835-1836
ISSN0962-8436
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 29. okt. 2006

Fingeraftryk

anaerobiosis
Metabolism
Ecosystems
Ecosystem
ecosystems
Earth (planet)
Carbon Isotopes
primary productivity
Photosynthesis
isotopes
electrons
photosynthesis
Electrons
Geologic Sediments
carbon
marine sediments
autotrophs
Sulfur
marine environment
sulfur

Citer dette

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title = "Early anaerobic metabolisms",
abstract = "Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle.",
keywords = "Anaerobiosis, Bacteria, Anaerobic, Evolution, Hydrogen, Iron, Nitrogen, Sulfur",
author = "Canfield, {Donald Eugene} and Rosing, {Minik T} and Christian Bjerrum",
year = "2006",
month = "10",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1098/rstb.2006.1906",
language = "English",
volume = "361",
pages = "1819--1834; discussion 1835--1836",
journal = "Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences",
issn = "0962-8436",
publisher = "The/Royal Society",
number = "1474",

}

Early anaerobic metabolisms. / Canfield, Donald Eugene; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian.

I: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, Bind 361, Nr. 1474, 29.10.2006, s. 1819-1834; discussion 1835-1836.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early anaerobic metabolisms

AU - Canfield, Donald Eugene

AU - Rosing, Minik T

AU - Bjerrum, Christian

PY - 2006/10/29

Y1 - 2006/10/29

N2 - Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle.

AB - Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle.

KW - Anaerobiosis

KW - Bacteria, Anaerobic

KW - Evolution

KW - Hydrogen

KW - Iron

KW - Nitrogen

KW - Sulfur

U2 - 10.1098/rstb.2006.1906

DO - 10.1098/rstb.2006.1906

M3 - Journal article

VL - 361

SP - 1819-1834; discussion 1835-1836

JO - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

JF - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

SN - 0962-8436

IS - 1474

ER -