Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors

Gustaf Edgren, Marie Reilly, Henrik Hjalgrim, Trung Nam Tran, Klaus Rostgaard, Johanna Adami, Kjell Titlestad, Agneta Shanwell, Mads Melbye, Olof Nyrén

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Apr-16
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJNCI - Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Vol/bind100
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)572-579
Antal sider7
ISSN0027-8874
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 16. apr. 2008

Fingeraftryk

Iron
Neoplasms
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Case-Control Studies
Logistic Models
Incidence

Citer dette

Edgren, G., Reilly, M., Hjalgrim, H., Tran, T. N., Rostgaard, K., Adami, J., ... Nyrén, O. (2008). Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors. JNCI - Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 100(8), 572-579. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djn084
Edgren, Gustaf ; Reilly, Marie ; Hjalgrim, Henrik ; Tran, Trung Nam ; Rostgaard, Klaus ; Adami, Johanna ; Titlestad, Kjell ; Shanwell, Agneta ; Melbye, Mads ; Nyrén, Olof. / Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors. I: JNCI - Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 2008 ; Bind 100, Nr. 8. s. 572-579.
@article{9efb50c03ddd11dda26c000ea68e967b,
title = "Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Long-term deleterious effects of repeated blood donations may be masked by the donors' healthy lifestyle. To investigate possible effects of blood donation and iron loss through blood donation on cancer incidence while minimizing {"}healthy donor effects,{"} we made dose-response comparisons within a cohort of Swedish and Danish blood donors. METHODS: We used a nested case-control study design, in which case patients were defined as all donors who were diagnosed with a malignancy between their first recorded blood donation and study termination (n = 10866). Control subjects (n = 107140) were individually matched on sex, age, and county of residence. Using conditional logistic regression, we estimated relative risks of cancer according to number of blood donations made or estimated iron loss 3-12 years before a case patient was diagnosed with cancer. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: No clear association was observed between number of donations and risk of cancer overall. However, between the lowest (< or = median, < 0.75 g) and highest (> 90th percentile, > 2.7 g) categories of estimated iron loss, there was a trend (P(trend) < .001) of decreasing risk for cancers of the liver, lung, colon, stomach, and esophagus, which are thought to be promoted by iron overload (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.70, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 0.58 to 0.84), but only among men and only with a latency of 3-7 years. The risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma was higher among frequent plasma donors (> 25 vs 0 donations, OR = 2.14, 95{\%} CI = 1.22 to 3.74). CONCLUSIONS: Repeated blood donation was not associated with increased or decreased risk of cancer overall. The lack of consistency across latency periods casts doubt on an apparent association between reduced cancer risk and iron loss in men. The positive association between frequent plasma donation and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma deserves further exploration.",
keywords = "Blood Donors, Case-Control Studies, Colonic Neoplasms, Confounding Factors (Epidemiology), Denmark, Esophageal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Iron, Liver Neoplasms, Lung Neoplasms, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Odds Ratio, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Stomach Neoplasms, Sweden, Time Factors",
author = "Gustaf Edgren and Marie Reilly and Henrik Hjalgrim and Tran, {Trung Nam} and Klaus Rostgaard and Johanna Adami and Kjell Titlestad and Agneta Shanwell and Mads Melbye and Olof Nyr{\'e}n",
year = "2008",
month = "4",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1093/jnci/djn084",
language = "English",
volume = "100",
pages = "572--579",
journal = "National Cancer Institute. Journal (Print)",
issn = "0027-8874",
publisher = "Heinemann",
number = "8",

}

Edgren, G, Reilly, M, Hjalgrim, H, Tran, TN, Rostgaard, K, Adami, J, Titlestad, K, Shanwell, A, Melbye, M & Nyrén, O 2008, 'Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors', JNCI - Journal of the National Cancer Institute, bind 100, nr. 8, s. 572-579. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djn084

Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors. / Edgren, Gustaf; Reilly, Marie; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Tran, Trung Nam; Rostgaard, Klaus; Adami, Johanna; Titlestad, Kjell; Shanwell, Agneta; Melbye, Mads; Nyrén, Olof.

I: JNCI - Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Bind 100, Nr. 8, 16.04.2008, s. 572-579.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors

AU - Edgren, Gustaf

AU - Reilly, Marie

AU - Hjalgrim, Henrik

AU - Tran, Trung Nam

AU - Rostgaard, Klaus

AU - Adami, Johanna

AU - Titlestad, Kjell

AU - Shanwell, Agneta

AU - Melbye, Mads

AU - Nyrén, Olof

PY - 2008/4/16

Y1 - 2008/4/16

N2 - BACKGROUND: Long-term deleterious effects of repeated blood donations may be masked by the donors' healthy lifestyle. To investigate possible effects of blood donation and iron loss through blood donation on cancer incidence while minimizing "healthy donor effects," we made dose-response comparisons within a cohort of Swedish and Danish blood donors. METHODS: We used a nested case-control study design, in which case patients were defined as all donors who were diagnosed with a malignancy between their first recorded blood donation and study termination (n = 10866). Control subjects (n = 107140) were individually matched on sex, age, and county of residence. Using conditional logistic regression, we estimated relative risks of cancer according to number of blood donations made or estimated iron loss 3-12 years before a case patient was diagnosed with cancer. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: No clear association was observed between number of donations and risk of cancer overall. However, between the lowest (< or = median, < 0.75 g) and highest (> 90th percentile, > 2.7 g) categories of estimated iron loss, there was a trend (P(trend) < .001) of decreasing risk for cancers of the liver, lung, colon, stomach, and esophagus, which are thought to be promoted by iron overload (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.58 to 0.84), but only among men and only with a latency of 3-7 years. The risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma was higher among frequent plasma donors (> 25 vs 0 donations, OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.22 to 3.74). CONCLUSIONS: Repeated blood donation was not associated with increased or decreased risk of cancer overall. The lack of consistency across latency periods casts doubt on an apparent association between reduced cancer risk and iron loss in men. The positive association between frequent plasma donation and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma deserves further exploration.

AB - BACKGROUND: Long-term deleterious effects of repeated blood donations may be masked by the donors' healthy lifestyle. To investigate possible effects of blood donation and iron loss through blood donation on cancer incidence while minimizing "healthy donor effects," we made dose-response comparisons within a cohort of Swedish and Danish blood donors. METHODS: We used a nested case-control study design, in which case patients were defined as all donors who were diagnosed with a malignancy between their first recorded blood donation and study termination (n = 10866). Control subjects (n = 107140) were individually matched on sex, age, and county of residence. Using conditional logistic regression, we estimated relative risks of cancer according to number of blood donations made or estimated iron loss 3-12 years before a case patient was diagnosed with cancer. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: No clear association was observed between number of donations and risk of cancer overall. However, between the lowest (< or = median, < 0.75 g) and highest (> 90th percentile, > 2.7 g) categories of estimated iron loss, there was a trend (P(trend) < .001) of decreasing risk for cancers of the liver, lung, colon, stomach, and esophagus, which are thought to be promoted by iron overload (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.58 to 0.84), but only among men and only with a latency of 3-7 years. The risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma was higher among frequent plasma donors (> 25 vs 0 donations, OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.22 to 3.74). CONCLUSIONS: Repeated blood donation was not associated with increased or decreased risk of cancer overall. The lack of consistency across latency periods casts doubt on an apparent association between reduced cancer risk and iron loss in men. The positive association between frequent plasma donation and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma deserves further exploration.

KW - Blood Donors

KW - Case-Control Studies

KW - Colonic Neoplasms

KW - Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)

KW - Denmark

KW - Esophageal Neoplasms

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Iron

KW - Liver Neoplasms

KW - Lung Neoplasms

KW - Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Neoplasms

KW - Odds Ratio

KW - Risk Assessment

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Sex Factors

KW - Stomach Neoplasms

KW - Sweden

KW - Time Factors

U2 - 10.1093/jnci/djn084

DO - 10.1093/jnci/djn084

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 18398098

VL - 100

SP - 572

EP - 579

JO - National Cancer Institute. Journal (Print)

JF - National Cancer Institute. Journal (Print)

SN - 0027-8874

IS - 8

ER -

Edgren G, Reilly M, Hjalgrim H, Tran TN, Rostgaard K, Adami J et al. Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors. JNCI - Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 2008 apr 16;100(8):572-579. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djn084