Domestic hospitality, gender, and impression management among Danish women

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Domestic life and domestic work are often studied in a family setting that only includes members of the focal family unit. However, when opening the home for guests, family life becomes both a back and front stage arena, where guests are relaxed but hosts are not. Being a host includes not only domestic chores but also “doing” identity, relations, and friendship. In this article, we combine Goffman's work with thirteen qualitative interviews from Denmark to investigate domestic hospitality and hosts' perceptions hereof. Domestic hospitality involves not only “putting on a show” but also extensive preparation and complex assessments of appropriate levels of staging. Such staging depends on occasions, host-guest relations, and hosts' predispositions. We discuss how reflexive and well-educated women, who are aware of their “putting on a show,” nevertheless put on such “shows.” Even in Denmark, which is rather progressive in terms of gender equality compared to other European countries, gender still matters and affects women's self-conceptualizations in domestic hospitality. It is well known that people manage the impressions they seek to make and adapt to different types of guests, but the contribution of this article is to pinpoint the extent to which the participants are aware of these processes, and of the fact that they are sometimes almost ridiculous, but still cannot not care.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftFood and Foodways
Vol/bind25
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)77-97
ISSN0740-9710
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 22. feb. 2017

Fingeraftryk

staging
Denmark
Hospital-Patient Relations
gender
management
interpersonal relationships
family relations
qualitative interview
friendship
equality
interviews
Interviews

Citer dette

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Domestic hospitality, gender, and impression management among Danish women. / Blichfeldt, Bodil Stilling ; Gram, Malene.

I: Food and Foodways, Bind 25, Nr. 1, 22.02.2017, s. 77-97.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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