Does Size really matter? A multisite study of competing diagnostic criteria

Maj Hansen, Philip Hyland, Karen-Inge Karstoft, Rikke Holm Bramsen, Henrik Bjarke Vægter, Cherie Armour, Anni Sternhagen, S. B. Andersen, Simone Larsen, Mette Hørbye, Tonny Elmose Andersen

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

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Resumé

Clinicians and researchers are becoming increasingly aware of the difficult decision that they are likely to be making within the next years; deciding between the use of two rather different descriptions of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th edition (DSM-5), which describes PTSD as a diagnosis comprised of 20 symptoms belonging to four symptom clusters, and the World Health Organization’s proposed 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) set for release in 2018 in which PTSD is comprised by only 6-7 symptoms belonging to three symptom clusters. Numerous studies have supported the latent structure of PTSD according to different models of the DSM-5 and the ICD-11 proposal. The few studies investigating the ICD-11 and the DSM-5 in the same populations appear to suggest that the ICD-11 model may result in better fit than the DSM-5 based models. At the same time, there is also a tendency for ICD-11 to produce lower estimated PTSD prevalence rates than the DSM-5 criteria, which may ultimately affect who is offered treatment. Of note, it is important to stress that there is a lack of studies investigating the latent structure of the ICD-11 and DSM-5 models in the same populations using appreciate measurements of both the ICD-11 and the DSM-5 PTSD. At the same time, it is important to investigate this in different trauma populations as previous research suggest that differences in prevalence rates may only exist following specific types of traumatic exposure.
The aim of the present study was to investigate the latent structure of different ICD-11 and DSM-5 models of PTSD in three different trauma populations and
compare the estimated diagnostic rates of PTSD based on the DSM-5 and the ICD-11, respectively.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2017
Antal sider1
StatusUdgivet - 2017
Begivenhed15th Conference of European Society for Traumatic Stress - SDU, Odense, Danmark
Varighed: 1. jun. 20173. jun. 2017
Konferencens nummer: 15

Konference

Konference15th Conference of European Society for Traumatic Stress
Nummer15
LokationSDU
LandDanmark
ByOdense
Periode01/06/201703/06/2017

Citer dette

Hansen, M., Hyland, P., Karstoft, K-I., Bramsen, R. H., Vægter, H. B., Armour, C., ... Andersen, T. E. (2017). Does Size really matter? A multisite study of competing diagnostic criteria. Poster session præsenteret på 15th Conference of European Society for Traumatic Stress , Odense, Danmark.
Hansen, Maj ; Hyland, Philip ; Karstoft, Karen-Inge ; Bramsen, Rikke Holm ; Vægter, Henrik Bjarke ; Armour, Cherie ; Sternhagen, Anni ; Andersen, S. B. ; Larsen, Simone ; Hørbye, Mette ; Andersen, Tonny Elmose. / Does Size really matter? A multisite study of competing diagnostic criteria. Poster session præsenteret på 15th Conference of European Society for Traumatic Stress , Odense, Danmark.1 s.
@conference{37f07cdc8ebb48c8aac4029a7af8b1c0,
title = "Does Size really matter? A multisite study of competing diagnostic criteria",
abstract = "Clinicians and researchers are becoming increasingly aware of the difficult decision that they are likely to be making within the next years; deciding between the use of two rather different descriptions of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th edition (DSM-5), which describes PTSD as a diagnosis comprised of 20 symptoms belonging to four symptom clusters, and the World Health Organization’s proposed 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) set for release in 2018 in which PTSD is comprised by only 6-7 symptoms belonging to three symptom clusters. Numerous studies have supported the latent structure of PTSD according to different models of the DSM-5 and the ICD-11 proposal. The few studies investigating the ICD-11 and the DSM-5 in the same populations appear to suggest that the ICD-11 model may result in better fit than the DSM-5 based models. At the same time, there is also a tendency for ICD-11 to produce lower estimated PTSD prevalence rates than the DSM-5 criteria, which may ultimately affect who is offered treatment. Of note, it is important to stress that there is a lack of studies investigating the latent structure of the ICD-11 and DSM-5 models in the same populations using appreciate measurements of both the ICD-11 and the DSM-5 PTSD. At the same time, it is important to investigate this in different trauma populations as previous research suggest that differences in prevalence rates may only exist following specific types of traumatic exposure.The aim of the present study was to investigate the latent structure of different ICD-11 and DSM-5 models of PTSD in three different trauma populations andcompare the estimated diagnostic rates of PTSD based on the DSM-5 and the ICD-11, respectively.",
author = "Maj Hansen and Philip Hyland and Karen-Inge Karstoft and Bramsen, {Rikke Holm} and V{\ae}gter, {Henrik Bjarke} and Cherie Armour and Anni Sternhagen and Andersen, {S. B.} and Simone Larsen and Mette H{\o}rbye and Andersen, {Tonny Elmose}",
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language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 01-06-2017 Through 03-06-2017",

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Hansen, M, Hyland, P, Karstoft, K-I, Bramsen, RH, Vægter, HB, Armour, C, Sternhagen, A, Andersen, SB, Larsen, S, Hørbye, M & Andersen, TE 2017, 'Does Size really matter? A multisite study of competing diagnostic criteria' 15th Conference of European Society for Traumatic Stress , Odense, Danmark, 01/06/2017 - 03/06/2017, .

Does Size really matter? A multisite study of competing diagnostic criteria. / Hansen, Maj; Hyland, Philip; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Bramsen, Rikke Holm; Vægter, Henrik Bjarke ; Armour, Cherie; Sternhagen, Anni; Andersen, S. B.; Larsen, Simone; Hørbye, Mette; Andersen, Tonny Elmose.

2017. Poster session præsenteret på 15th Conference of European Society for Traumatic Stress , Odense, Danmark.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

TY - CONF

T1 - Does Size really matter? A multisite study of competing diagnostic criteria

AU - Hansen, Maj

AU - Hyland, Philip

AU - Karstoft, Karen-Inge

AU - Bramsen, Rikke Holm

AU - Vægter, Henrik Bjarke

AU - Armour, Cherie

AU - Sternhagen, Anni

AU - Andersen, S. B.

AU - Larsen, Simone

AU - Hørbye, Mette

AU - Andersen, Tonny Elmose

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Clinicians and researchers are becoming increasingly aware of the difficult decision that they are likely to be making within the next years; deciding between the use of two rather different descriptions of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th edition (DSM-5), which describes PTSD as a diagnosis comprised of 20 symptoms belonging to four symptom clusters, and the World Health Organization’s proposed 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) set for release in 2018 in which PTSD is comprised by only 6-7 symptoms belonging to three symptom clusters. Numerous studies have supported the latent structure of PTSD according to different models of the DSM-5 and the ICD-11 proposal. The few studies investigating the ICD-11 and the DSM-5 in the same populations appear to suggest that the ICD-11 model may result in better fit than the DSM-5 based models. At the same time, there is also a tendency for ICD-11 to produce lower estimated PTSD prevalence rates than the DSM-5 criteria, which may ultimately affect who is offered treatment. Of note, it is important to stress that there is a lack of studies investigating the latent structure of the ICD-11 and DSM-5 models in the same populations using appreciate measurements of both the ICD-11 and the DSM-5 PTSD. At the same time, it is important to investigate this in different trauma populations as previous research suggest that differences in prevalence rates may only exist following specific types of traumatic exposure.The aim of the present study was to investigate the latent structure of different ICD-11 and DSM-5 models of PTSD in three different trauma populations andcompare the estimated diagnostic rates of PTSD based on the DSM-5 and the ICD-11, respectively.

AB - Clinicians and researchers are becoming increasingly aware of the difficult decision that they are likely to be making within the next years; deciding between the use of two rather different descriptions of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th edition (DSM-5), which describes PTSD as a diagnosis comprised of 20 symptoms belonging to four symptom clusters, and the World Health Organization’s proposed 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) set for release in 2018 in which PTSD is comprised by only 6-7 symptoms belonging to three symptom clusters. Numerous studies have supported the latent structure of PTSD according to different models of the DSM-5 and the ICD-11 proposal. The few studies investigating the ICD-11 and the DSM-5 in the same populations appear to suggest that the ICD-11 model may result in better fit than the DSM-5 based models. At the same time, there is also a tendency for ICD-11 to produce lower estimated PTSD prevalence rates than the DSM-5 criteria, which may ultimately affect who is offered treatment. Of note, it is important to stress that there is a lack of studies investigating the latent structure of the ICD-11 and DSM-5 models in the same populations using appreciate measurements of both the ICD-11 and the DSM-5 PTSD. At the same time, it is important to investigate this in different trauma populations as previous research suggest that differences in prevalence rates may only exist following specific types of traumatic exposure.The aim of the present study was to investigate the latent structure of different ICD-11 and DSM-5 models of PTSD in three different trauma populations andcompare the estimated diagnostic rates of PTSD based on the DSM-5 and the ICD-11, respectively.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Hansen M, Hyland P, Karstoft K-I, Bramsen RH, Vægter HB, Armour C et al. Does Size really matter? A multisite study of competing diagnostic criteria. 2017. Poster session præsenteret på 15th Conference of European Society for Traumatic Stress , Odense, Danmark.