Does Motor Development in Infancy Predict Spinal Pain in Later Childhood? A Cohort Study

Steven J Kamper, Christopher M Williams, Lise Hestbaek

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Study Design Longitudinal cohort study. Background Spinal pain is responsible for a huge personal and societal burden but the aetiology remains unclear. Deficits in motor control have been implicated with spinal pain in adults, and delayed motor development is associated with a range of health problems and risks in children. Objectives To assess whether there is an independent relationship between the age at which infants first sit and walk without support, and spinal pain at age 11 years. Methods Data from the Danish National Birth Cohort were analysed. Predictors were age at which the child first sat, and first walked without support. Predictors were measured by parent-report when the children were aged 6, and 18 months, along with a comprehensive list of covariates, including; child sex, birthweight and cognitive development, socioeconomic indicators, and parental health variables. Outcomes were measured at 11 years of age using the Young Spine questionnaire that recorded the presence and intensity of spinal pain. Data were analysed using multivariable logistic regression models to estimate determinants of, respectively, neck, thoracic, lumbar, and multisite pain. Results The analyses included data from approximately 23,000 children and their parents. There were no consistent independent associations between the age at first sitting or walking, and spinal pain at the age of 11. Odds ratios were between 0.96 and 1.01 for the various pain sites. Conclusion The age at which a child first sits or walks without support does not influence the likelihood that they will experience spinal pain in later childhood. Level of Evidence Etiology 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 15 Sep 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7484.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Journal of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy
Vol/bind47
Udgave nummer10
Sider (fra-til)763–768
Antal sider6
ISSN0190-6011
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Health
Longitudinal Studies
Parents
Odds Ratio

Citer dette

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abstract = "Study Design Longitudinal cohort study. Background Spinal pain is responsible for a huge personal and societal burden but the aetiology remains unclear. Deficits in motor control have been implicated with spinal pain in adults, and delayed motor development is associated with a range of health problems and risks in children. Objectives To assess whether there is an independent relationship between the age at which infants first sit and walk without support, and spinal pain at age 11 years. Methods Data from the Danish National Birth Cohort were analysed. Predictors were age at which the child first sat, and first walked without support. Predictors were measured by parent-report when the children were aged 6, and 18 months, along with a comprehensive list of covariates, including; child sex, birthweight and cognitive development, socioeconomic indicators, and parental health variables. Outcomes were measured at 11 years of age using the Young Spine questionnaire that recorded the presence and intensity of spinal pain. Data were analysed using multivariable logistic regression models to estimate determinants of, respectively, neck, thoracic, lumbar, and multisite pain. Results The analyses included data from approximately 23,000 children and their parents. There were no consistent independent associations between the age at first sitting or walking, and spinal pain at the age of 11. Odds ratios were between 0.96 and 1.01 for the various pain sites. Conclusion The age at which a child first sits or walks without support does not influence the likelihood that they will experience spinal pain in later childhood. Level of Evidence Etiology 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 15 Sep 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7484.",
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Does Motor Development in Infancy Predict Spinal Pain in Later Childhood? A Cohort Study. / Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M; Hestbaek, Lise.

I: The Journal of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy, Bind 47, Nr. 10, 2017, s. 763–768.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does Motor Development in Infancy Predict Spinal Pain in Later Childhood?

T2 - A Cohort Study

AU - Kamper, Steven J

AU - Williams, Christopher M

AU - Hestbaek, Lise

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Study Design Longitudinal cohort study. Background Spinal pain is responsible for a huge personal and societal burden but the aetiology remains unclear. Deficits in motor control have been implicated with spinal pain in adults, and delayed motor development is associated with a range of health problems and risks in children. Objectives To assess whether there is an independent relationship between the age at which infants first sit and walk without support, and spinal pain at age 11 years. Methods Data from the Danish National Birth Cohort were analysed. Predictors were age at which the child first sat, and first walked without support. Predictors were measured by parent-report when the children were aged 6, and 18 months, along with a comprehensive list of covariates, including; child sex, birthweight and cognitive development, socioeconomic indicators, and parental health variables. Outcomes were measured at 11 years of age using the Young Spine questionnaire that recorded the presence and intensity of spinal pain. Data were analysed using multivariable logistic regression models to estimate determinants of, respectively, neck, thoracic, lumbar, and multisite pain. Results The analyses included data from approximately 23,000 children and their parents. There were no consistent independent associations between the age at first sitting or walking, and spinal pain at the age of 11. Odds ratios were between 0.96 and 1.01 for the various pain sites. Conclusion The age at which a child first sits or walks without support does not influence the likelihood that they will experience spinal pain in later childhood. Level of Evidence Etiology 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 15 Sep 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7484.

AB - Study Design Longitudinal cohort study. Background Spinal pain is responsible for a huge personal and societal burden but the aetiology remains unclear. Deficits in motor control have been implicated with spinal pain in adults, and delayed motor development is associated with a range of health problems and risks in children. Objectives To assess whether there is an independent relationship between the age at which infants first sit and walk without support, and spinal pain at age 11 years. Methods Data from the Danish National Birth Cohort were analysed. Predictors were age at which the child first sat, and first walked without support. Predictors were measured by parent-report when the children were aged 6, and 18 months, along with a comprehensive list of covariates, including; child sex, birthweight and cognitive development, socioeconomic indicators, and parental health variables. Outcomes were measured at 11 years of age using the Young Spine questionnaire that recorded the presence and intensity of spinal pain. Data were analysed using multivariable logistic regression models to estimate determinants of, respectively, neck, thoracic, lumbar, and multisite pain. Results The analyses included data from approximately 23,000 children and their parents. There were no consistent independent associations between the age at first sitting or walking, and spinal pain at the age of 11. Odds ratios were between 0.96 and 1.01 for the various pain sites. Conclusion The age at which a child first sits or walks without support does not influence the likelihood that they will experience spinal pain in later childhood. Level of Evidence Etiology 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 15 Sep 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7484.

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