Does Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy benefit all people with diabetes and comorbid emotional complaints equally?

Moderators in the DiaMind trial

Ivan Nyklíček, Jenny VAN Son, Victor J M Pop, Johan Denollet, Francois Pouwer

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

OBJECTIVES: Research has shown the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for a variety of emotional problems in different samples, but it is unknown which factors influence this effectiveness. Therefore, the aim of the current study was: which factors (demographic, personality, and baseline levels of mindfulness skills) moderate the effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)?

METHODS: Outpatients with diabetes (type 1 or type 2; N=139) and an elevated level of emotional distress participated in the Diabetes and Mindfulness (DiaMind) trial. They were randomized into MBCT (N=70) or a control group (N=69) that received treatment as usual and that was offered the intervention 6months later. Primary outcomes were anxiety, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress at post-intervention and at 6-month follow-up.

RESULTS: Mixed models analyses showed that sex, extraversion, and baseline acting with awareness were significant moderators of effectiveness. In the MBCT group, women showed larger decreases in anxiety and depression across time (large effects) compared to men (medium to small effects). For extraversion divided into quartiles, the three lowest quartiles generally exhibited large decreases in symptoms, whereas the high extraversion group showed medium (perceived stress) to small (depression) decreases.

CONCLUSION: MBCT seems to be effective to decrease symptoms of anxiety, depression, and perceived stress for a broad range of person characteristics in patients with diabetes. However, men and those high in extraversion showed considerably lower effectiveness compared to the other groups. The small effect in high extraverts may be due to the large dropout in this subgroup.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Vol/bind91
Udgave nummerDecember
Sider (fra-til)40-47
Antal sider8
ISSN0022-3999
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2016

Fingeraftryk

Depression
Outpatients
Control Groups
Extraversion (Psychology)
Research

Citer dette

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title = "Does Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy benefit all people with diabetes and comorbid emotional complaints equally?: Moderators in the DiaMind trial",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Research has shown the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for a variety of emotional problems in different samples, but it is unknown which factors influence this effectiveness. Therefore, the aim of the current study was: which factors (demographic, personality, and baseline levels of mindfulness skills) moderate the effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)?METHODS: Outpatients with diabetes (type 1 or type 2; N=139) and an elevated level of emotional distress participated in the Diabetes and Mindfulness (DiaMind) trial. They were randomized into MBCT (N=70) or a control group (N=69) that received treatment as usual and that was offered the intervention 6months later. Primary outcomes were anxiety, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress at post-intervention and at 6-month follow-up.RESULTS: Mixed models analyses showed that sex, extraversion, and baseline acting with awareness were significant moderators of effectiveness. In the MBCT group, women showed larger decreases in anxiety and depression across time (large effects) compared to men (medium to small effects). For extraversion divided into quartiles, the three lowest quartiles generally exhibited large decreases in symptoms, whereas the high extraversion group showed medium (perceived stress) to small (depression) decreases.CONCLUSION: MBCT seems to be effective to decrease symptoms of anxiety, depression, and perceived stress for a broad range of person characteristics in patients with diabetes. However, men and those high in extraversion showed considerably lower effectiveness compared to the other groups. The small effect in high extraverts may be due to the large dropout in this subgroup.",
author = "Ivan Nykl{\'i}ček and {VAN Son}, Jenny and Pop, {Victor J M} and Johan Denollet and Francois Pouwer",
note = "Copyright {\^A}{\circledC} 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpsychores.2016.10.009",
language = "English",
volume = "91",
pages = "40--47",
journal = "Journal of Psychosomatic Research",
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Does Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy benefit all people with diabetes and comorbid emotional complaints equally? Moderators in the DiaMind trial. / Nyklíček, Ivan; VAN Son, Jenny; Pop, Victor J M; Denollet, Johan; Pouwer, Francois.

I: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Bind 91, Nr. December, 12.2016, s. 40-47.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy benefit all people with diabetes and comorbid emotional complaints equally?

T2 - Moderators in the DiaMind trial

AU - Nyklíček, Ivan

AU - VAN Son, Jenny

AU - Pop, Victor J M

AU - Denollet, Johan

AU - Pouwer, Francois

N1 - Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2016/12

Y1 - 2016/12

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Research has shown the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for a variety of emotional problems in different samples, but it is unknown which factors influence this effectiveness. Therefore, the aim of the current study was: which factors (demographic, personality, and baseline levels of mindfulness skills) moderate the effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)?METHODS: Outpatients with diabetes (type 1 or type 2; N=139) and an elevated level of emotional distress participated in the Diabetes and Mindfulness (DiaMind) trial. They were randomized into MBCT (N=70) or a control group (N=69) that received treatment as usual and that was offered the intervention 6months later. Primary outcomes were anxiety, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress at post-intervention and at 6-month follow-up.RESULTS: Mixed models analyses showed that sex, extraversion, and baseline acting with awareness were significant moderators of effectiveness. In the MBCT group, women showed larger decreases in anxiety and depression across time (large effects) compared to men (medium to small effects). For extraversion divided into quartiles, the three lowest quartiles generally exhibited large decreases in symptoms, whereas the high extraversion group showed medium (perceived stress) to small (depression) decreases.CONCLUSION: MBCT seems to be effective to decrease symptoms of anxiety, depression, and perceived stress for a broad range of person characteristics in patients with diabetes. However, men and those high in extraversion showed considerably lower effectiveness compared to the other groups. The small effect in high extraverts may be due to the large dropout in this subgroup.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Research has shown the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for a variety of emotional problems in different samples, but it is unknown which factors influence this effectiveness. Therefore, the aim of the current study was: which factors (demographic, personality, and baseline levels of mindfulness skills) moderate the effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)?METHODS: Outpatients with diabetes (type 1 or type 2; N=139) and an elevated level of emotional distress participated in the Diabetes and Mindfulness (DiaMind) trial. They were randomized into MBCT (N=70) or a control group (N=69) that received treatment as usual and that was offered the intervention 6months later. Primary outcomes were anxiety, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress at post-intervention and at 6-month follow-up.RESULTS: Mixed models analyses showed that sex, extraversion, and baseline acting with awareness were significant moderators of effectiveness. In the MBCT group, women showed larger decreases in anxiety and depression across time (large effects) compared to men (medium to small effects). For extraversion divided into quartiles, the three lowest quartiles generally exhibited large decreases in symptoms, whereas the high extraversion group showed medium (perceived stress) to small (depression) decreases.CONCLUSION: MBCT seems to be effective to decrease symptoms of anxiety, depression, and perceived stress for a broad range of person characteristics in patients with diabetes. However, men and those high in extraversion showed considerably lower effectiveness compared to the other groups. The small effect in high extraverts may be due to the large dropout in this subgroup.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2016.10.009

DO - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2016.10.009

M3 - Journal article

VL - 91

SP - 40

EP - 47

JO - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

JF - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

SN - 0022-3999

IS - December

ER -