Does It Work For Everyone? The Effect of The Take A Stand! Sitting-Intervention In Subgroups Defined By Socio-Demographic, Health-Related, Work-Related And Psychosocial Factors

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Resumé

OBJECTIVE: Take a Stand! was a multicomponent workplace-based intervention reducing sitting among office-workers. This study tested whether the effect of Take a Stand! differed across subgroups. METHODS: A cluster-randomized controlled trial with objectively measured sitting-time as primary outcome evaluated Take a Stand! Main analysis was reanalyzed in strata defined by four levels of preselected factors: socio-demographic (eg, sex); health-related (eg, smoking); work-related (eg, workhours); and psychosocial (eg, motivation to change sitting). RESULTS: No notable differences in the effect were observed: across all assessed subgroups sitting time was ∼60 minutes less after 1 month and ∼40 minutes less after 3 months in intervention as compared with control group. CONCLUSION: There was no differential effect of Take a Stand! indicating that the intervention was effective in all groups. This knowledge is advantageous when disseminating similar interventions to different populations of office workers.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Vol/bind62
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)30-36
ISSN1076-2752
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2020

Fingeraftryk

Health
Workplace
Randomized Controlled Trials
Smoking
Control Groups
Population

Citer dette

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title = "Does It Work For Everyone?: The Effect of The Take A Stand! Sitting-Intervention In Subgroups Defined By Socio-Demographic, Health-Related, Work-Related And Psychosocial Factors",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Take a Stand! was a multicomponent workplace-based intervention reducing sitting among office-workers. This study tested whether the effect of Take a Stand! differed across subgroups. METHODS: A cluster-randomized controlled trial with objectively measured sitting-time as primary outcome evaluated Take a Stand! Main analysis was reanalyzed in strata defined by four levels of preselected factors: socio-demographic (eg, sex); health-related (eg, smoking); work-related (eg, workhours); and psychosocial (eg, motivation to change sitting). RESULTS: No notable differences in the effect were observed: across all assessed subgroups sitting time was ∼60 minutes less after 1 month and ∼40 minutes less after 3 months in intervention as compared with control group. CONCLUSION: There was no differential effect of Take a Stand! indicating that the intervention was effective in all groups. This knowledge is advantageous when disseminating similar interventions to different populations of office workers.",
author = "Danquah, {Ida H} and Tolstrup, {Janne S}",
year = "2020",
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T1 - Does It Work For Everyone?

T2 - The Effect of The Take A Stand! Sitting-Intervention In Subgroups Defined By Socio-Demographic, Health-Related, Work-Related And Psychosocial Factors

AU - Danquah, Ida H

AU - Tolstrup, Janne S

PY - 2020/1

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: Take a Stand! was a multicomponent workplace-based intervention reducing sitting among office-workers. This study tested whether the effect of Take a Stand! differed across subgroups. METHODS: A cluster-randomized controlled trial with objectively measured sitting-time as primary outcome evaluated Take a Stand! Main analysis was reanalyzed in strata defined by four levels of preselected factors: socio-demographic (eg, sex); health-related (eg, smoking); work-related (eg, workhours); and psychosocial (eg, motivation to change sitting). RESULTS: No notable differences in the effect were observed: across all assessed subgroups sitting time was ∼60 minutes less after 1 month and ∼40 minutes less after 3 months in intervention as compared with control group. CONCLUSION: There was no differential effect of Take a Stand! indicating that the intervention was effective in all groups. This knowledge is advantageous when disseminating similar interventions to different populations of office workers.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Take a Stand! was a multicomponent workplace-based intervention reducing sitting among office-workers. This study tested whether the effect of Take a Stand! differed across subgroups. METHODS: A cluster-randomized controlled trial with objectively measured sitting-time as primary outcome evaluated Take a Stand! Main analysis was reanalyzed in strata defined by four levels of preselected factors: socio-demographic (eg, sex); health-related (eg, smoking); work-related (eg, workhours); and psychosocial (eg, motivation to change sitting). RESULTS: No notable differences in the effect were observed: across all assessed subgroups sitting time was ∼60 minutes less after 1 month and ∼40 minutes less after 3 months in intervention as compared with control group. CONCLUSION: There was no differential effect of Take a Stand! indicating that the intervention was effective in all groups. This knowledge is advantageous when disseminating similar interventions to different populations of office workers.

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DO - 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001737

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