Does India Need a Universal High-Dose Vitamin A Supplementation Program?

Ted Greiner*, John Mason, Christine Stabell Benn, H P S Sachdev

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

Resumé

High dose vitamin A (HDVA) concentrate began to be distributed in India in 1970 as a short-term, stop-gap approach to reduce clinical signs of vitamin A deficiency. As this problem declined globally, the purpose of distributing them changed to the reduction of young child mortality. However, their impact on this has also declined, if not disappeared, as suggested in India by the enormous DEVTA study. This may be because of improved protection against and treatment of the main morbidity involved, measles and diarrhea. At the same time, semi-annual provision of mega-doses of vitamin A is not without risks, in particular linked to children's vaccination status. While a single dose is inexpensive, large-scale implementation of HDVA programs is expensive, particularly the opportunity cost involved in reducing the time health workers involved have to deal with their other commitments. Balancing potential benefits, risks and costs leads us to recommend an immediate cessation of the distribution of HDVA in India.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Indian Journal of Pediatrics
Vol/bind86
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)538-541
ISSN0019-5456
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Vitamin A Deficiency
Child Mortality
Measles
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health

Citer dette

Greiner, Ted ; Mason, John ; Benn, Christine Stabell ; Sachdev, H P S. / Does India Need a Universal High-Dose Vitamin A Supplementation Program?. I: The Indian Journal of Pediatrics. 2019 ; Bind 86, Nr. 6. s. 538-541.
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title = "Does India Need a Universal High-Dose Vitamin A Supplementation Program?",
abstract = "High dose vitamin A (HDVA) concentrate began to be distributed in India in 1970 as a short-term, stop-gap approach to reduce clinical signs of vitamin A deficiency. As this problem declined globally, the purpose of distributing them changed to the reduction of young child mortality. However, their impact on this has also declined, if not disappeared, as suggested in India by the enormous DEVTA study. This may be because of improved protection against and treatment of the main morbidity involved, measles and diarrhea. At the same time, semi-annual provision of mega-doses of vitamin A is not without risks, in particular linked to children's vaccination status. While a single dose is inexpensive, large-scale implementation of HDVA programs is expensive, particularly the opportunity cost involved in reducing the time health workers involved have to deal with their other commitments. Balancing potential benefits, risks and costs leads us to recommend an immediate cessation of the distribution of HDVA in India.",
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Does India Need a Universal High-Dose Vitamin A Supplementation Program? / Greiner, Ted; Mason, John; Benn, Christine Stabell; Sachdev, H P S.

I: The Indian Journal of Pediatrics, Bind 86, Nr. 6, 06.2019, s. 538-541.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

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AU - Greiner, Ted

AU - Mason, John

AU - Benn, Christine Stabell

AU - Sachdev, H P S

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AB - High dose vitamin A (HDVA) concentrate began to be distributed in India in 1970 as a short-term, stop-gap approach to reduce clinical signs of vitamin A deficiency. As this problem declined globally, the purpose of distributing them changed to the reduction of young child mortality. However, their impact on this has also declined, if not disappeared, as suggested in India by the enormous DEVTA study. This may be because of improved protection against and treatment of the main morbidity involved, measles and diarrhea. At the same time, semi-annual provision of mega-doses of vitamin A is not without risks, in particular linked to children's vaccination status. While a single dose is inexpensive, large-scale implementation of HDVA programs is expensive, particularly the opportunity cost involved in reducing the time health workers involved have to deal with their other commitments. Balancing potential benefits, risks and costs leads us to recommend an immediate cessation of the distribution of HDVA in India.

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