Does future resource input reflect need in first-episode psychosis

Examining the association between individual characteristics and 5-year costs

Lene H. Hastrup*, Merete Nordentoft, Dorte Gyrd-Hansen

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Aim: Coupling data on future resource consumption with baseline characteristics can provide vital information of future consumption patterns for newly diagnosed patients. This study tested whether higher need (as measured by severity of illness) and other baseline characteristics of newly diagnosed patients were associated with higher future service costs. Method: Five hundred forty-seven patients between 18 and 45 years randomized to the OPUS trial was analysed in the study. Multiple regression analysis was applied to estimate the impact of the explanatory variables on mean total costs, which consisted of total health care costs and costs of supportive living facilities. Results: Lower age, higher level of symptoms (global assessment of functioning), alcohol or cannabis misuse, and being homeless were associated with higher total costs over 5 years, whereas sex, duration of untreated psychosis, and educational level did not show any impact on future resource consumption. Conclusion: The association between future costs and severity of illness suggests that higher needs among patients were associated with higher resource input level. Our results also indicate that other factors than need might affect future costs, for example, parents who serve as advocates for young patients had impact on future health costs. We also found indications of potential barriers among patients with other citizenship in access to health-care services. The strength of the study is that resource data were extracted from official Danish registers and interviewers collected information on clinical characteristics. The results are likely to be context-specific but can be generalized to settings with similar treatment practices.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEarly Intervention in Psychiatry
Vol/bind13
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1056-1061
ISSN1751-7885
DOI
StatusUdgivet - okt. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Cost of Illness
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services
Parents
Regression Analysis
Alcohols
Interviews

Citer dette

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abstract = "Aim: Coupling data on future resource consumption with baseline characteristics can provide vital information of future consumption patterns for newly diagnosed patients. This study tested whether higher need (as measured by severity of illness) and other baseline characteristics of newly diagnosed patients were associated with higher future service costs. Method: Five hundred forty-seven patients between 18 and 45 years randomized to the OPUS trial was analysed in the study. Multiple regression analysis was applied to estimate the impact of the explanatory variables on mean total costs, which consisted of total health care costs and costs of supportive living facilities. Results: Lower age, higher level of symptoms (global assessment of functioning), alcohol or cannabis misuse, and being homeless were associated with higher total costs over 5 years, whereas sex, duration of untreated psychosis, and educational level did not show any impact on future resource consumption. Conclusion: The association between future costs and severity of illness suggests that higher needs among patients were associated with higher resource input level. Our results also indicate that other factors than need might affect future costs, for example, parents who serve as advocates for young patients had impact on future health costs. We also found indications of potential barriers among patients with other citizenship in access to health-care services. The strength of the study is that resource data were extracted from official Danish registers and interviewers collected information on clinical characteristics. The results are likely to be context-specific but can be generalized to settings with similar treatment practices.",
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Does future resource input reflect need in first-episode psychosis : Examining the association between individual characteristics and 5-year costs. / Hastrup, Lene H.; Nordentoft, Merete; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte.

I: Early Intervention in Psychiatry, Bind 13, Nr. 5, 10.2019, s. 1056-1061.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does future resource input reflect need in first-episode psychosis

T2 - Examining the association between individual characteristics and 5-year costs

AU - Hastrup, Lene H.

AU - Nordentoft, Merete

AU - Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

PY - 2019/10

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N2 - Aim: Coupling data on future resource consumption with baseline characteristics can provide vital information of future consumption patterns for newly diagnosed patients. This study tested whether higher need (as measured by severity of illness) and other baseline characteristics of newly diagnosed patients were associated with higher future service costs. Method: Five hundred forty-seven patients between 18 and 45 years randomized to the OPUS trial was analysed in the study. Multiple regression analysis was applied to estimate the impact of the explanatory variables on mean total costs, which consisted of total health care costs and costs of supportive living facilities. Results: Lower age, higher level of symptoms (global assessment of functioning), alcohol or cannabis misuse, and being homeless were associated with higher total costs over 5 years, whereas sex, duration of untreated psychosis, and educational level did not show any impact on future resource consumption. Conclusion: The association between future costs and severity of illness suggests that higher needs among patients were associated with higher resource input level. Our results also indicate that other factors than need might affect future costs, for example, parents who serve as advocates for young patients had impact on future health costs. We also found indications of potential barriers among patients with other citizenship in access to health-care services. The strength of the study is that resource data were extracted from official Danish registers and interviewers collected information on clinical characteristics. The results are likely to be context-specific but can be generalized to settings with similar treatment practices.

AB - Aim: Coupling data on future resource consumption with baseline characteristics can provide vital information of future consumption patterns for newly diagnosed patients. This study tested whether higher need (as measured by severity of illness) and other baseline characteristics of newly diagnosed patients were associated with higher future service costs. Method: Five hundred forty-seven patients between 18 and 45 years randomized to the OPUS trial was analysed in the study. Multiple regression analysis was applied to estimate the impact of the explanatory variables on mean total costs, which consisted of total health care costs and costs of supportive living facilities. Results: Lower age, higher level of symptoms (global assessment of functioning), alcohol or cannabis misuse, and being homeless were associated with higher total costs over 5 years, whereas sex, duration of untreated psychosis, and educational level did not show any impact on future resource consumption. Conclusion: The association between future costs and severity of illness suggests that higher needs among patients were associated with higher resource input level. Our results also indicate that other factors than need might affect future costs, for example, parents who serve as advocates for young patients had impact on future health costs. We also found indications of potential barriers among patients with other citizenship in access to health-care services. The strength of the study is that resource data were extracted from official Danish registers and interviewers collected information on clinical characteristics. The results are likely to be context-specific but can be generalized to settings with similar treatment practices.

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