Do lifestyle factors and general health predict dropout among recently qualified eldercare workers?

A two-year follow-up study

Hanne Giver, Anne Faber, Jesper Strøyer, Harald Hannerz, Karen Albertsen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: The eldercare sector in Denmark as in many industrialised countries is characterised by difficulties in retaining labour. Research suggests a possible imbalance between lifestyle and health among eldercare trainees and the demanding work encountered as eldercare employees. The aim of the present study was to determine the predictive effect of lifestyle and self-rated health on dropout from the Danish eldercare sector two years after qualification.

METHODS: We included 4,526 female eldercare trainees in the analyses of lifestyle parameters and 5,023 in the analyses of self-rated health. The participants in this prospective study were recruited from 27 of the 28 Danish colleges for eldercare. We linked survey data with national register data to obtain information about labour market attachment two years after qualification.

RESULTS: The results of the present study showed that the poorer self-rated health, the higher the risk for dropout from the labour market (p < 0.0001). However, the results were less consistent regarding the predictive effect of a detrimental lifestyle. We found that overweight/obesity (p = 0.0021 and p = 0.0012) as well as smoking (p = 0.0017) decreased the risk of dropout from eldercare into education. We found no support for increased likelihood of dropout among physically inactive.

CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study show that a poorer self-rated health is a predictor for dropout, not only from the eldercare two years after qualification, but from the labour market as a whole. However, the results were less consistent regarding the predictive effect of a detrimental lifestyle on dropout.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftScandinavian Journal of Public Health
Vol/bind39
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)280-286
ISSN1403-4948
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2011
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Health
Denmark
Developed Countries
Smoking
Prospective Studies
Education
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Citer dette

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title = "Do lifestyle factors and general health predict dropout among recently qualified eldercare workers?: A two-year follow-up study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The eldercare sector in Denmark as in many industrialised countries is characterised by difficulties in retaining labour. Research suggests a possible imbalance between lifestyle and health among eldercare trainees and the demanding work encountered as eldercare employees. The aim of the present study was to determine the predictive effect of lifestyle and self-rated health on dropout from the Danish eldercare sector two years after qualification.METHODS: We included 4,526 female eldercare trainees in the analyses of lifestyle parameters and 5,023 in the analyses of self-rated health. The participants in this prospective study were recruited from 27 of the 28 Danish colleges for eldercare. We linked survey data with national register data to obtain information about labour market attachment two years after qualification.RESULTS: The results of the present study showed that the poorer self-rated health, the higher the risk for dropout from the labour market (p < 0.0001). However, the results were less consistent regarding the predictive effect of a detrimental lifestyle. We found that overweight/obesity (p = 0.0021 and p = 0.0012) as well as smoking (p = 0.0017) decreased the risk of dropout from eldercare into education. We found no support for increased likelihood of dropout among physically inactive.CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study show that a poorer self-rated health is a predictor for dropout, not only from the eldercare two years after qualification, but from the labour market as a whole. However, the results were less consistent regarding the predictive effect of a detrimental lifestyle on dropout.",
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pages = "280--286",
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Do lifestyle factors and general health predict dropout among recently qualified eldercare workers? A two-year follow-up study. / Giver, Hanne; Faber, Anne; Strøyer, Jesper; Hannerz, Harald; Albertsen, Karen.

I: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, Bind 39, Nr. 3, 2011, s. 280-286.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do lifestyle factors and general health predict dropout among recently qualified eldercare workers?

T2 - A two-year follow-up study

AU - Giver, Hanne

AU - Faber, Anne

AU - Strøyer, Jesper

AU - Hannerz, Harald

AU - Albertsen, Karen

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - BACKGROUND: The eldercare sector in Denmark as in many industrialised countries is characterised by difficulties in retaining labour. Research suggests a possible imbalance between lifestyle and health among eldercare trainees and the demanding work encountered as eldercare employees. The aim of the present study was to determine the predictive effect of lifestyle and self-rated health on dropout from the Danish eldercare sector two years after qualification.METHODS: We included 4,526 female eldercare trainees in the analyses of lifestyle parameters and 5,023 in the analyses of self-rated health. The participants in this prospective study were recruited from 27 of the 28 Danish colleges for eldercare. We linked survey data with national register data to obtain information about labour market attachment two years after qualification.RESULTS: The results of the present study showed that the poorer self-rated health, the higher the risk for dropout from the labour market (p < 0.0001). However, the results were less consistent regarding the predictive effect of a detrimental lifestyle. We found that overweight/obesity (p = 0.0021 and p = 0.0012) as well as smoking (p = 0.0017) decreased the risk of dropout from eldercare into education. We found no support for increased likelihood of dropout among physically inactive.CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study show that a poorer self-rated health is a predictor for dropout, not only from the eldercare two years after qualification, but from the labour market as a whole. However, the results were less consistent regarding the predictive effect of a detrimental lifestyle on dropout.

AB - BACKGROUND: The eldercare sector in Denmark as in many industrialised countries is characterised by difficulties in retaining labour. Research suggests a possible imbalance between lifestyle and health among eldercare trainees and the demanding work encountered as eldercare employees. The aim of the present study was to determine the predictive effect of lifestyle and self-rated health on dropout from the Danish eldercare sector two years after qualification.METHODS: We included 4,526 female eldercare trainees in the analyses of lifestyle parameters and 5,023 in the analyses of self-rated health. The participants in this prospective study were recruited from 27 of the 28 Danish colleges for eldercare. We linked survey data with national register data to obtain information about labour market attachment two years after qualification.RESULTS: The results of the present study showed that the poorer self-rated health, the higher the risk for dropout from the labour market (p < 0.0001). However, the results were less consistent regarding the predictive effect of a detrimental lifestyle. We found that overweight/obesity (p = 0.0021 and p = 0.0012) as well as smoking (p = 0.0017) decreased the risk of dropout from eldercare into education. We found no support for increased likelihood of dropout among physically inactive.CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study show that a poorer self-rated health is a predictor for dropout, not only from the eldercare two years after qualification, but from the labour market as a whole. However, the results were less consistent regarding the predictive effect of a detrimental lifestyle on dropout.

KW - Adult

KW - Denmark

KW - Female

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Geriatric Nursing

KW - Health Services for the Aged

KW - Health Status

KW - Home Health Aides

KW - Humans

KW - Life Style

KW - Overweight

KW - Personnel Turnover

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Sedentary Lifestyle

KW - Smoking

KW - Workload

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1177/1403494810396555

DO - 10.1177/1403494810396555

M3 - Journal article

VL - 39

SP - 280

EP - 286

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

SN - 1403-4948

IS - 3

ER -