Do Exercisers With Musculoskeletal Injuries Report Symptoms of Depression and Stress?

Mia Beck Lichtenstein, Claire Gudex, Kjeld Andersen, Anders Bo Bojesen, Uffe Jørgensen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Context: Sports injuries in athletes can lead to negative emotional responses in terms of anger, anxiety, confusion, and sadness. Severe injuries can be understood as a stressful life event with increased levels of psychological distress, but injury assessment and rehabilitation typically focus on somatic symptoms. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depression and emotional stress and to measure self-rated health in regular exercisers presenting to a sports medicine clinic with musculoskeletal injury. The secondary aimwas to identify psychosocial factors associatedwith depression in injured exercisers and the potential need for psychological counseling. Design: A cross-sectional survey study. Setting: A sports medicine clinic for injuries of the foot, knee, or shoulder. Participants: Regular exercisers with present injuries (N = 694) and exercisers without injuries (N = 494). Regular exercisers were defined as those undertaking moderate exercise at least once a week. Intervention: A questionnaire survey completed on paper by patients in a sports medicine clinic and a web-based version completed by online sports communities. Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed the Major Depression Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, health-related quality of life, and questions on sociodemographics, exercise habits, and injury history. Results: Symptoms of depression were reported by 12% of injured exercisers and 5% of noninjured controls (P < .001). Clinical stress was found in 30% of injured exercisers and 22%of controls (P = .002), and the EQ-5D-5L Visual Analog Scale score was lower for injured (69 [SD = 19]) than noninjured exercisers (87 [SD = 13], P < .001). Injured exerciserswith symptoms of depression reported high stress levels and impaired daily functioning, were younger, and were more likely to have over 10 days injury-related work absence. Conclusions: The authors recommend psychological assessment of exercisers attending a sports medicine clinic for musculoskeletal injury and a supplemental clinical psychological interview for suspected depression or stress-related psychopathology.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Vol/bind28
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)46-51
ISSN1056-6716
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2019

Fingeraftryk

Depression
Wounds and Injuries
Psychological Interviews
Cross-Sectional Studies
Foot Injuries
Exercise
Knee Injuries
Psychopathology
Visual Analog Scale
Athletes
Habits
Counseling
Quality of Life
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Equipment and Supplies
Health

Citer dette

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title = "Do Exercisers With Musculoskeletal Injuries Report Symptoms of Depression and Stress?",
abstract = "Context: Sports injuries in athletes can lead to negative emotional responses in terms of anger, anxiety, confusion, and sadness. Severe injuries can be understood as a stressful life event with increased levels of psychological distress, but injury assessment and rehabilitation typically focus on somatic symptoms. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depression and emotional stress and to measure self-rated health in regular exercisers presenting to a sports medicine clinic with musculoskeletal injury. The secondary aimwas to identify psychosocial factors associatedwith depression in injured exercisers and the potential need for psychological counseling. Design: A cross-sectional survey study. Setting: A sports medicine clinic for injuries of the foot, knee, or shoulder. Participants: Regular exercisers with present injuries (N = 694) and exercisers without injuries (N = 494). Regular exercisers were defined as those undertaking moderate exercise at least once a week. Intervention: A questionnaire survey completed on paper by patients in a sports medicine clinic and a web-based version completed by online sports communities. Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed the Major Depression Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, health-related quality of life, and questions on sociodemographics, exercise habits, and injury history. Results: Symptoms of depression were reported by 12{\%} of injured exercisers and 5{\%} of noninjured controls (P < .001). Clinical stress was found in 30{\%} of injured exercisers and 22{\%}of controls (P = .002), and the EQ-5D-5L Visual Analog Scale score was lower for injured (69 [SD = 19]) than noninjured exercisers (87 [SD = 13], P < .001). Injured exerciserswith symptoms of depression reported high stress levels and impaired daily functioning, were younger, and were more likely to have over 10 days injury-related work absence. Conclusions: The authors recommend psychological assessment of exercisers attending a sports medicine clinic for musculoskeletal injury and a supplemental clinical psychological interview for suspected depression or stress-related psychopathology.",
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author = "Lichtenstein, {Mia Beck} and Claire Gudex and Kjeld Andersen and Bojesen, {Anders Bo} and Uffe J{\o}rgensen",
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doi = "10.1123/jsr.2017-0103",
language = "English",
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Do Exercisers With Musculoskeletal Injuries Report Symptoms of Depression and Stress? / Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Gudex, Claire; Andersen, Kjeld; Bojesen, Anders Bo; Jørgensen, Uffe.

I: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, Bind 28, Nr. 1, 2019, s. 46-51.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do Exercisers With Musculoskeletal Injuries Report Symptoms of Depression and Stress?

AU - Lichtenstein, Mia Beck

AU - Gudex, Claire

AU - Andersen, Kjeld

AU - Bojesen, Anders Bo

AU - Jørgensen, Uffe

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Context: Sports injuries in athletes can lead to negative emotional responses in terms of anger, anxiety, confusion, and sadness. Severe injuries can be understood as a stressful life event with increased levels of psychological distress, but injury assessment and rehabilitation typically focus on somatic symptoms. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depression and emotional stress and to measure self-rated health in regular exercisers presenting to a sports medicine clinic with musculoskeletal injury. The secondary aimwas to identify psychosocial factors associatedwith depression in injured exercisers and the potential need for psychological counseling. Design: A cross-sectional survey study. Setting: A sports medicine clinic for injuries of the foot, knee, or shoulder. Participants: Regular exercisers with present injuries (N = 694) and exercisers without injuries (N = 494). Regular exercisers were defined as those undertaking moderate exercise at least once a week. Intervention: A questionnaire survey completed on paper by patients in a sports medicine clinic and a web-based version completed by online sports communities. Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed the Major Depression Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, health-related quality of life, and questions on sociodemographics, exercise habits, and injury history. Results: Symptoms of depression were reported by 12% of injured exercisers and 5% of noninjured controls (P < .001). Clinical stress was found in 30% of injured exercisers and 22%of controls (P = .002), and the EQ-5D-5L Visual Analog Scale score was lower for injured (69 [SD = 19]) than noninjured exercisers (87 [SD = 13], P < .001). Injured exerciserswith symptoms of depression reported high stress levels and impaired daily functioning, were younger, and were more likely to have over 10 days injury-related work absence. Conclusions: The authors recommend psychological assessment of exercisers attending a sports medicine clinic for musculoskeletal injury and a supplemental clinical psychological interview for suspected depression or stress-related psychopathology.

AB - Context: Sports injuries in athletes can lead to negative emotional responses in terms of anger, anxiety, confusion, and sadness. Severe injuries can be understood as a stressful life event with increased levels of psychological distress, but injury assessment and rehabilitation typically focus on somatic symptoms. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depression and emotional stress and to measure self-rated health in regular exercisers presenting to a sports medicine clinic with musculoskeletal injury. The secondary aimwas to identify psychosocial factors associatedwith depression in injured exercisers and the potential need for psychological counseling. Design: A cross-sectional survey study. Setting: A sports medicine clinic for injuries of the foot, knee, or shoulder. Participants: Regular exercisers with present injuries (N = 694) and exercisers without injuries (N = 494). Regular exercisers were defined as those undertaking moderate exercise at least once a week. Intervention: A questionnaire survey completed on paper by patients in a sports medicine clinic and a web-based version completed by online sports communities. Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed the Major Depression Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, health-related quality of life, and questions on sociodemographics, exercise habits, and injury history. Results: Symptoms of depression were reported by 12% of injured exercisers and 5% of noninjured controls (P < .001). Clinical stress was found in 30% of injured exercisers and 22%of controls (P = .002), and the EQ-5D-5L Visual Analog Scale score was lower for injured (69 [SD = 19]) than noninjured exercisers (87 [SD = 13], P < .001). Injured exerciserswith symptoms of depression reported high stress levels and impaired daily functioning, were younger, and were more likely to have over 10 days injury-related work absence. Conclusions: The authors recommend psychological assessment of exercisers attending a sports medicine clinic for musculoskeletal injury and a supplemental clinical psychological interview for suspected depression or stress-related psychopathology.

KW - Emotional stress

KW - Interdisciplinary interventions

KW - Regular exercise

KW - Sport injury

U2 - 10.1123/jsr.2017-0103

DO - 10.1123/jsr.2017-0103

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28872439

VL - 28

SP - 46

EP - 51

JO - Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

SN - 1056-6716

IS - 1

ER -