Do eating behaviors in the general population account for country variance in glycemic control among adolescents with diabetes

the Hvidoere Study Group and the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study

Pernille Due, Carine de Beaufort, Mogens Trab Damsgaard, Henrik Bindesbøl Mortensen, Mette Rasmussen, Naman Ahluwalia, Timothy Skinner, Peter Swift, the HSG and HBSC consortia

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    BACKGROUND: The Hvidoere Study Group (HSG) has demonstrated major differences in glycemic control between pediatric diabetes centers which remain largely unexplained. This study investigates whether these differences are partly attributable to healthy eating norms in the background population. METHODS: The study involved adolescents from 18 countries from (i) the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study (HBSC) and (ii) the HSG. There were 94 387 participants from representative HBSC samples of 11-, 13- and 15-yr-olds and 1483 11- to 15-yr-old adolescents with diabetes from the HSG. The frequency of intake of fruit, vegetables, sweets, sugary soft drinks, and daily breakfast was compared between the two groups. The glycemic control of the adolescents in the HSG cohort was determined by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESULTS: Across countries in the HSBC survey, there was substantial variation in prevalence of healthy eating behavior and even greater variation between adolescents from the HSG centers. In all countries more adolescents with diabetes reported healthy eating behavior compared to national norms. In individuals healthy eating behavior had a significant effect on the individual level HbA1c. There was no significant correlation between the frequencies of these healthy eating behaviors at (i) the national level and (ii) diabetes center level and the center mean HbA1c. CONCLUSIONS: Although individual healthy eating behavior is associated with better glycemic control at the individual level, such eating behavior does not explain the center differences in HbA1c. Similarly, the reported healthy eating norm of the background populations does not explain the variation in glycemic control among centers.
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftPediatric Diabetes Online
    ISSN1399-5448
    DOI
    StatusUdgivet - 17. jun. 2013

    Fingeraftryk

    Health Behavior
    Population
    Breakfast
    Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
    Healthy Diet
    Vegetables
    Fruit
    Cohort Studies
    Pediatrics

    Citer dette

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    title = "Do eating behaviors in the general population account for country variance in glycemic control among adolescents with diabetes: the Hvidoere Study Group and the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study",
    abstract = "BACKGROUND: The Hvidoere Study Group (HSG) has demonstrated major differences in glycemic control between pediatric diabetes centers which remain largely unexplained. This study investigates whether these differences are partly attributable to healthy eating norms in the background population. METHODS: The study involved adolescents from 18 countries from (i) the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study (HBSC) and (ii) the HSG. There were 94 387 participants from representative HBSC samples of 11-, 13- and 15-yr-olds and 1483 11- to 15-yr-old adolescents with diabetes from the HSG. The frequency of intake of fruit, vegetables, sweets, sugary soft drinks, and daily breakfast was compared between the two groups. The glycemic control of the adolescents in the HSG cohort was determined by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESULTS: Across countries in the HSBC survey, there was substantial variation in prevalence of healthy eating behavior and even greater variation between adolescents from the HSG centers. In all countries more adolescents with diabetes reported healthy eating behavior compared to national norms. In individuals healthy eating behavior had a significant effect on the individual level HbA1c. There was no significant correlation between the frequencies of these healthy eating behaviors at (i) the national level and (ii) diabetes center level and the center mean HbA1c. CONCLUSIONS: Although individual healthy eating behavior is associated with better glycemic control at the individual level, such eating behavior does not explain the center differences in HbA1c. Similarly, the reported healthy eating norm of the background populations does not explain the variation in glycemic control among centers.",
    author = "Pernille Due and {de Beaufort}, Carine and Damsgaard, {Mogens Trab} and Mortensen, {Henrik Bindesb{\o}l} and Mette Rasmussen and Naman Ahluwalia and Timothy Skinner and Peter Swift and {the HSG and HBSC consortia}",
    note = "{\circledC} 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
    year = "2013",
    month = "6",
    day = "17",
    doi = "10.1111/pedi.12038",
    language = "English",
    journal = "Pediatric Diabetes Online",
    issn = "1399-5448",
    publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

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    Do eating behaviors in the general population account for country variance in glycemic control among adolescents with diabetes : the Hvidoere Study Group and the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study. / Due, Pernille; de Beaufort, Carine; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab; Mortensen, Henrik Bindesbøl; Rasmussen, Mette; Ahluwalia, Naman; Skinner, Timothy; Swift, Peter; the HSG and HBSC consortia.

    I: Pediatric Diabetes Online, 17.06.2013.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Do eating behaviors in the general population account for country variance in glycemic control among adolescents with diabetes

    T2 - the Hvidoere Study Group and the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study

    AU - Due, Pernille

    AU - de Beaufort, Carine

    AU - Damsgaard, Mogens Trab

    AU - Mortensen, Henrik Bindesbøl

    AU - Rasmussen, Mette

    AU - Ahluwalia, Naman

    AU - Skinner, Timothy

    AU - Swift, Peter

    AU - the HSG and HBSC consortia

    N1 - © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    PY - 2013/6/17

    Y1 - 2013/6/17

    N2 - BACKGROUND: The Hvidoere Study Group (HSG) has demonstrated major differences in glycemic control between pediatric diabetes centers which remain largely unexplained. This study investigates whether these differences are partly attributable to healthy eating norms in the background population. METHODS: The study involved adolescents from 18 countries from (i) the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study (HBSC) and (ii) the HSG. There were 94 387 participants from representative HBSC samples of 11-, 13- and 15-yr-olds and 1483 11- to 15-yr-old adolescents with diabetes from the HSG. The frequency of intake of fruit, vegetables, sweets, sugary soft drinks, and daily breakfast was compared between the two groups. The glycemic control of the adolescents in the HSG cohort was determined by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESULTS: Across countries in the HSBC survey, there was substantial variation in prevalence of healthy eating behavior and even greater variation between adolescents from the HSG centers. In all countries more adolescents with diabetes reported healthy eating behavior compared to national norms. In individuals healthy eating behavior had a significant effect on the individual level HbA1c. There was no significant correlation between the frequencies of these healthy eating behaviors at (i) the national level and (ii) diabetes center level and the center mean HbA1c. CONCLUSIONS: Although individual healthy eating behavior is associated with better glycemic control at the individual level, such eating behavior does not explain the center differences in HbA1c. Similarly, the reported healthy eating norm of the background populations does not explain the variation in glycemic control among centers.

    AB - BACKGROUND: The Hvidoere Study Group (HSG) has demonstrated major differences in glycemic control between pediatric diabetes centers which remain largely unexplained. This study investigates whether these differences are partly attributable to healthy eating norms in the background population. METHODS: The study involved adolescents from 18 countries from (i) the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study (HBSC) and (ii) the HSG. There were 94 387 participants from representative HBSC samples of 11-, 13- and 15-yr-olds and 1483 11- to 15-yr-old adolescents with diabetes from the HSG. The frequency of intake of fruit, vegetables, sweets, sugary soft drinks, and daily breakfast was compared between the two groups. The glycemic control of the adolescents in the HSG cohort was determined by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESULTS: Across countries in the HSBC survey, there was substantial variation in prevalence of healthy eating behavior and even greater variation between adolescents from the HSG centers. In all countries more adolescents with diabetes reported healthy eating behavior compared to national norms. In individuals healthy eating behavior had a significant effect on the individual level HbA1c. There was no significant correlation between the frequencies of these healthy eating behaviors at (i) the national level and (ii) diabetes center level and the center mean HbA1c. CONCLUSIONS: Although individual healthy eating behavior is associated with better glycemic control at the individual level, such eating behavior does not explain the center differences in HbA1c. Similarly, the reported healthy eating norm of the background populations does not explain the variation in glycemic control among centers.

    U2 - 10.1111/pedi.12038

    DO - 10.1111/pedi.12038

    M3 - Journal article

    JO - Pediatric Diabetes Online

    JF - Pediatric Diabetes Online

    SN - 1399-5448

    ER -