Divining the Distant Past: Altered Consciousness, the Paranormal and Archaeology

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Resumé

Alternative archaeology, often less charitably called ‘cult archaeology’ or ‘pseudo-archaeology’, is one of many fields that is instantly recognisable yet maddeningly difficult to pin down and define. 1 It will be obvious to most observers that something fundamental distinguishes the theories regarding the pyramids formulated by Erich von Däniken (they were built by means of technologies introduced by alien visitors from outer space) or Graham Hancock (they were created by a civilisation of perhaps Atlantean origin some 12,000 years ago) from the much more mundane theories of run-of-the-mill Egyptologists (they were built by Egyptians, who combined ingenuity and hard work). Intuitively, it is equally clear that von Däniken and Hancock in some sense or another belong to a broader milieu, where it is routinely suggested that prehistoric peoples had access to technology at least as advanced as our own, that all major civilisations ultimately stem from Atlantis and Lemuria and that conventional archaeologists and historians have misdated cultures and artefacts by many millennia. As a minimal definition, what unites all such theories is that they are considered to be utterly wrong by the academic mainstream. One fundamental problem with such a wastebasket approach is that disciplines such as archaeology and history are littered with discarded approaches and that hypotheses current just a few decades ago are today considered quaint relics from the annals of scholarship. Following a line of enquiry proposed by Egil Asprem, 2 I suggest that it is more fruitful to distinguish the ‘alternative’ field by its preferred subject matter, its institutional setting and its theories and methods.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelAltered Consciousness in the Twentieth Century
RedaktørerJake Poller
Udgivelses stedNew York & Abingdon
ForlagRoutledge
Publikationsdato2019
Sider113-130
Kapitel5
ISBN (Trykt)9780367183769
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2019

Fingeraftryk

Paranormal
Archaeology
Consciousness
Civilization
Fundamental
Atlantis
Cult
Egyptians
History
Archaeologists
Milieu
Conventional
Annals
Subject Matter
Observer
Millennium
Historian
Relics
Egyptologists
Artifact

Citer dette

Hammer, O. (2019). Divining the Distant Past: Altered Consciousness, the Paranormal and Archaeology. I J. Poller (red.), Altered Consciousness in the Twentieth Century (s. 113-130). New York & Abingdon: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429061196-6
Hammer, Olav. / Divining the Distant Past : Altered Consciousness, the Paranormal and Archaeology. Altered Consciousness in the Twentieth Century. red. / Jake Poller. New York & Abingdon : Routledge, 2019. s. 113-130
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Hammer, O 2019, Divining the Distant Past: Altered Consciousness, the Paranormal and Archaeology. i J Poller (red.), Altered Consciousness in the Twentieth Century. Routledge, New York & Abingdon, s. 113-130. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429061196-6

Divining the Distant Past : Altered Consciousness, the Paranormal and Archaeology. / Hammer, Olav.

Altered Consciousness in the Twentieth Century. red. / Jake Poller. New York & Abingdon : Routledge, 2019. s. 113-130.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

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Hammer O. Divining the Distant Past: Altered Consciousness, the Paranormal and Archaeology. I Poller J, red., Altered Consciousness in the Twentieth Century. New York & Abingdon: Routledge. 2019. s. 113-130 https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429061196-6