Disruptive innovation potential of the value propositions of 3D printing technology startups

Søren Jensen, Stoyan Tanev, Finn Hahn

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

Resumé

3D printing (or additive manufacturing) is a term used to describe the production of tangible products by using digitally controlled machine tools. The novelty of this manufacturing approach consists in the selective addition of materials layer-upon-layer, rather than through machining from solid material objects, moulding or casting. 3D printing (3DP) technologies have the potential to change the traditional manufacturing paradigm as well as to enable the emergence of new innovation practices based on mass customization, user design and distributed product innovation. As a result, 3DP is considered to be a truly disruptive technology. It is however an emerging technology which is exploited today by only a small number of early global adopters (McKinsey & Company, 2013). At the same time, it appears to be significantly over-hyped, which has the potential to demotivate potential technology adopters. The existing literature focusing on 3DP and additive manufacturing appears to suffer from a “double disease.” First, it appears dominated by consultancy reports and reviews by practitioners which lack the methodological depth and the predictive power of serious research studies. Second, it is dominated by technical publications which, although highly valuable, focus on the engineering aspects of the technologies and much less on the specific ways they are expected to disrupt the existing manufacturing and innovation practices. In addition, there seems to be confusion in the use of the terms “disruptive technology” and “disruptive innovation” (Christensen, 2006) which does not really help in examining the market opportunities associated with specific 3DP technologies. There is a need for more systematic empirical research using the insights of disruptive innovation theory to examine the market potential of 3DP technology startups. The objective of this research is to empirically examine the existing business opportunities in the 3D printing technology sector. To meet this objective we have addressed two research questions: a) How do technology startups integrate new 3D printing technologies into specific market offers? b) Which of the VPs are most attractive in terms of public interest, investment and disruptiveness? For the sake of this research a VP is conceptualized by means of three components: the specific market offer, the target customer and the job that the target customer is trying to do by using the market offer (Johnson et al., 2008). Last but not least, the research aims at conceptualizing the degree of disruptiveness as part of the evaluation criteria of emerging business opportunities by academics, government bodies, entrepreneurs and investors.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelThe Proceedings of The ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum (October 2014)
RedaktørerK. R. E. Huizingh, S. Conn, M. Torkkeli, I. Bitran
Antal sider11
ForlagISPIM
Publikationsdato6. okt. 2014
ISBN (Trykt)978-952-265-589-9
StatusUdgivet - 6. okt. 2014
Begivenhed2014 ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum - University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada
Varighed: 5. okt. 20148. okt. 2014

Konference

Konference2014 ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum
LokationUniversity of Montreal
LandCanada
ByMontreal
Periode05/10/201408/10/2014

Fingeraftryk

Value proposition
Disruptive innovation
Start-ups
Manufacturing
Disruptive technology
Innovation
Government
Product innovation
Consultancy
Market potential
Novelty
Mass customization
Evaluation criteria
Predictive power
Empirical research
Innovation theory
Machine tool
Public interest
Emerging technologies
Paradigm

Bibliografisk note

The Proceedings of The ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum (October 2014)
Editors: Huizingh, K.R.E, Conn, S. Torkkeli, M. and Bitran, I.
ISBN 978-952-265-589-9

Citer dette

Jensen, S., Tanev, S., & Hahn, F. (2014). Disruptive innovation potential of the value propositions of 3D printing technology startups. I K. R. E. Huizingh, S. Conn, M. Torkkeli, & I. Bitran (red.), The Proceedings of The ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum (October 2014) ISPIM.
Jensen, Søren ; Tanev, Stoyan ; Hahn, Finn. / Disruptive innovation potential of the value propositions of 3D printing technology startups. The Proceedings of The ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum (October 2014). red. / K. R. E. Huizingh ; S. Conn ; M. Torkkeli ; I. Bitran. ISPIM, 2014.
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Jensen, S, Tanev, S & Hahn, F 2014, Disruptive innovation potential of the value propositions of 3D printing technology startups. i KRE Huizingh, S Conn, M Torkkeli & I Bitran (red), The Proceedings of The ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum (October 2014). ISPIM, 2014 ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum, Montreal, Canada, 05/10/2014.

Disruptive innovation potential of the value propositions of 3D printing technology startups. / Jensen, Søren; Tanev, Stoyan; Hahn, Finn.

The Proceedings of The ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum (October 2014). red. / K. R. E. Huizingh; S. Conn; M. Torkkeli; I. Bitran. ISPIM, 2014.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

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KW - Disruptive innovation

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BT - The Proceedings of The ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum (October 2014)

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Jensen S, Tanev S, Hahn F. Disruptive innovation potential of the value propositions of 3D printing technology startups. I Huizingh KRE, Conn S, Torkkeli M, Bitran I, red., The Proceedings of The ISPIM Americas Innovation Forum (October 2014). ISPIM. 2014