Disparities In Cancer Care And Costs At The End Of Life: Evidence From England's National Health Service

Brendan Walsh, Mauro Laudicella

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

In universal health care systems such as the English National Health Service, equality of access is a core principle, and health care is free at the point of delivery. However, even within a universal system, disparities in care and costs exist along a socioeconomic gradient. Little is known about socioeconomic disparities at the end of life and how they affect health care costs. This study examines disparities in end-of-life treatment costs for cancer patients in England. Analyzing data on over 250,000 colorectal, breast, prostate, and lung cancer patients from multiple national databases, we found evidence illustrating that disparities are driven largely by the greater use of emergency inpatient care among patients of lower socioeconomic status. Even within a system with free health care, differences in the use of care create disparities in cancer costs. While further studies of these barriers is required, our research suggests that disparities may be reduced through better management of needs through the use of less expensive and more effective health care settings and treatments.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftHealth Affairs
Vol/bind36
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)1218-1226
ISSN0278-2715
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. jul. 2017
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

National Health Programs
England
Delivery of Health Care
Neoplasms
Emergency Medical Services
Inpatients
Colorectal Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Databases
Research

Bibliografisk note

Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

Citer dette

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Disparities In Cancer Care And Costs At The End Of Life : Evidence From England's National Health Service. / Walsh, Brendan; Laudicella, Mauro.

I: Health Affairs, Bind 36, Nr. 7, 01.07.2017, s. 1218-1226.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disparities In Cancer Care And Costs At The End Of Life

T2 - Evidence From England's National Health Service

AU - Walsh, Brendan

AU - Laudicella, Mauro

N1 - Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

PY - 2017/7/1

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N2 - In universal health care systems such as the English National Health Service, equality of access is a core principle, and health care is free at the point of delivery. However, even within a universal system, disparities in care and costs exist along a socioeconomic gradient. Little is known about socioeconomic disparities at the end of life and how they affect health care costs. This study examines disparities in end-of-life treatment costs for cancer patients in England. Analyzing data on over 250,000 colorectal, breast, prostate, and lung cancer patients from multiple national databases, we found evidence illustrating that disparities are driven largely by the greater use of emergency inpatient care among patients of lower socioeconomic status. Even within a system with free health care, differences in the use of care create disparities in cancer costs. While further studies of these barriers is required, our research suggests that disparities may be reduced through better management of needs through the use of less expensive and more effective health care settings and treatments.

AB - In universal health care systems such as the English National Health Service, equality of access is a core principle, and health care is free at the point of delivery. However, even within a universal system, disparities in care and costs exist along a socioeconomic gradient. Little is known about socioeconomic disparities at the end of life and how they affect health care costs. This study examines disparities in end-of-life treatment costs for cancer patients in England. Analyzing data on over 250,000 colorectal, breast, prostate, and lung cancer patients from multiple national databases, we found evidence illustrating that disparities are driven largely by the greater use of emergency inpatient care among patients of lower socioeconomic status. Even within a system with free health care, differences in the use of care create disparities in cancer costs. While further studies of these barriers is required, our research suggests that disparities may be reduced through better management of needs through the use of less expensive and more effective health care settings and treatments.

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KW - Male

KW - National Health Programs

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KW - Socioeconomic Factors

KW - Terminal Care/statistics & numerical data

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