Differences between questionnaire- and interview-based measures of activities of daily living (ADL) ability and their association with observed ADL ability in women with rheumatoid arthritis, knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia

Eva Wæhrens, Henning Bliddal, Bente Danneskiold-Samsøe, Hans Lund, A Fisher

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Objectives: Although self-report based on questionnaire is the common method to obtain information about activities of daily living (ADL) ability in rheumatic diseases, little is known about the relationship between measures of ADL ability based on questionnaire, interview, and observation. The present study examined whether measures of self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire and interview yielded different results, determined whether the magnitude of the difference varied among women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), knee osteoarthritis (OA), and fibromyalgia (FM), and investigated the relationships between self-reported and observed ADL ability. Method: The 47 ADL tasks of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire (ADL-Q) and interview (ADL-I), and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) was used to obtain measures of observed ADL ability. Results: Participants across diagnostic groups reported significantly more ADL ability based on the ADL-Q than on the ADL-I. Moderate correlations were found between the ADL-Q and ADL-I ability measures. Although low to moderate correlations were seen between measures based on the AMPS ADL motor scale and the ADL-Q and ADL-I, respectively, correlations between measures based on AMPS ADL process scale and ADL-Q and ADL-I were generally low. Overall, there was no difference in how the measures based on the two modes of self-report related to the observed ADL ability measures. Conclusion: Measures of self-reported ADL ability based on either questionnaire or interview have limited relationship to each other or to observed performance of ADL tasks.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
BogserieScandinavian Journal of Rheumatology. Supplement
Vol/bind41
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)95-102
Antal sider8
ISSN1502-7740
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

Fingeraftryk

Fibromyalgia
Knee Osteoarthritis
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires
Motor Skills
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Self Report

Citer dette

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title = "Differences between questionnaire- and interview-based measures of activities of daily living (ADL) ability and their association with observed ADL ability in women with rheumatoid arthritis, knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia",
abstract = "Objectives: Although self-report based on questionnaire is the common method to obtain information about activities of daily living (ADL) ability in rheumatic diseases, little is known about the relationship between measures of ADL ability based on questionnaire, interview, and observation. The present study examined whether measures of self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire and interview yielded different results, determined whether the magnitude of the difference varied among women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), knee osteoarthritis (OA), and fibromyalgia (FM), and investigated the relationships between self-reported and observed ADL ability. Method: The 47 ADL tasks of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire (ADL-Q) and interview (ADL-I), and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) was used to obtain measures of observed ADL ability. Results: Participants across diagnostic groups reported significantly more ADL ability based on the ADL-Q than on the ADL-I. Moderate correlations were found between the ADL-Q and ADL-I ability measures. Although low to moderate correlations were seen between measures based on the AMPS ADL motor scale and the ADL-Q and ADL-I, respectively, correlations between measures based on AMPS ADL process scale and ADL-Q and ADL-I were generally low. Overall, there was no difference in how the measures based on the two modes of self-report related to the observed ADL ability measures. Conclusion: Measures of self-reported ADL ability based on either questionnaire or interview have limited relationship to each other or to observed performance of ADL tasks.",
author = "Eva W{\ae}hrens and Henning Bliddal and Bente Danneskiold-Sams{\o}e and Hans Lund and A Fisher",
note = "Accepted 12 October 2011",
year = "2012",
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volume = "41",
pages = "95--102",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology. Supplement",
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Differences between questionnaire- and interview-based measures of activities of daily living (ADL) ability and their association with observed ADL ability in women with rheumatoid arthritis, knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia. / Wæhrens, Eva; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Lund, Hans ; Fisher, A.

I: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology. Supplement, Bind 41, Nr. 2, 2012, s. 95-102.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differences between questionnaire- and interview-based measures of activities of daily living (ADL) ability and their association with observed ADL ability in women with rheumatoid arthritis, knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia

AU - Wæhrens, Eva

AU - Bliddal, Henning

AU - Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

AU - Lund, Hans

AU - Fisher, A

N1 - Accepted 12 October 2011

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Objectives: Although self-report based on questionnaire is the common method to obtain information about activities of daily living (ADL) ability in rheumatic diseases, little is known about the relationship between measures of ADL ability based on questionnaire, interview, and observation. The present study examined whether measures of self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire and interview yielded different results, determined whether the magnitude of the difference varied among women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), knee osteoarthritis (OA), and fibromyalgia (FM), and investigated the relationships between self-reported and observed ADL ability. Method: The 47 ADL tasks of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire (ADL-Q) and interview (ADL-I), and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) was used to obtain measures of observed ADL ability. Results: Participants across diagnostic groups reported significantly more ADL ability based on the ADL-Q than on the ADL-I. Moderate correlations were found between the ADL-Q and ADL-I ability measures. Although low to moderate correlations were seen between measures based on the AMPS ADL motor scale and the ADL-Q and ADL-I, respectively, correlations between measures based on AMPS ADL process scale and ADL-Q and ADL-I were generally low. Overall, there was no difference in how the measures based on the two modes of self-report related to the observed ADL ability measures. Conclusion: Measures of self-reported ADL ability based on either questionnaire or interview have limited relationship to each other or to observed performance of ADL tasks.

AB - Objectives: Although self-report based on questionnaire is the common method to obtain information about activities of daily living (ADL) ability in rheumatic diseases, little is known about the relationship between measures of ADL ability based on questionnaire, interview, and observation. The present study examined whether measures of self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire and interview yielded different results, determined whether the magnitude of the difference varied among women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), knee osteoarthritis (OA), and fibromyalgia (FM), and investigated the relationships between self-reported and observed ADL ability. Method: The 47 ADL tasks of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire (ADL-Q) and interview (ADL-I), and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) was used to obtain measures of observed ADL ability. Results: Participants across diagnostic groups reported significantly more ADL ability based on the ADL-Q than on the ADL-I. Moderate correlations were found between the ADL-Q and ADL-I ability measures. Although low to moderate correlations were seen between measures based on the AMPS ADL motor scale and the ADL-Q and ADL-I, respectively, correlations between measures based on AMPS ADL process scale and ADL-Q and ADL-I were generally low. Overall, there was no difference in how the measures based on the two modes of self-report related to the observed ADL ability measures. Conclusion: Measures of self-reported ADL ability based on either questionnaire or interview have limited relationship to each other or to observed performance of ADL tasks.

U2 - 10.3109/03009742.2011.632380

DO - 10.3109/03009742.2011.632380

M3 - Journal article

VL - 41

SP - 95

EP - 102

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology. Supplement

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology. Supplement

SN - 1502-7740

IS - 2

ER -