Dietary guanidinoacetic acid does not accumulate in the brain of healthy men

Sergej M. Ostojic*, Jelena Ostojic

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftLetterForskningpeer review

Resumé

We conducted a secondary analysis of a previously completed trial to determine the effects of 8-week guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) loading on brain GAA levels in five healthy men. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was taken at baseline and post-administration, with spectra additionally analyzed for brain GAA and glutamate concentrations using TARQUIN 4.3.10 software. Brain GAA levels remained essentially unchanged at follow-up (an increase of 7.7% from baseline levels; 95% confidence interval, - 24.1% to 39.5%; P = 0.88) when averaged across 12 white and grey matter voxel locations. No significant changes were found for brain glutamate levels during the study (P = 0.64). Supplemental GAA appears to be safe intervention concerning brain GAA deposition, at least with GAA dosages used.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Nutrition
Vol/bind57
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)3003–3005
ISSN1436-6207
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Glutamic Acid
Confidence Intervals
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
White Matter
Gray Matter

Citer dette

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title = "Dietary guanidinoacetic acid does not accumulate in the brain of healthy men",
abstract = "We conducted a secondary analysis of a previously completed trial to determine the effects of 8-week guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) loading on brain GAA levels in five healthy men. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was taken at baseline and post-administration, with spectra additionally analyzed for brain GAA and glutamate concentrations using TARQUIN 4.3.10 software. Brain GAA levels remained essentially unchanged at follow-up (an increase of 7.7{\%} from baseline levels; 95{\%} confidence interval, - 24.1{\%} to 39.5{\%}; P = 0.88) when averaged across 12 white and grey matter voxel locations. No significant changes were found for brain glutamate levels during the study (P = 0.64). Supplemental GAA appears to be safe intervention concerning brain GAA deposition, at least with GAA dosages used.",
keywords = "Glutamate, Guanidinoacetic acid, MR spectroscopy, Supplementation",
author = "Ostojic, {Sergej M.} and Jelena Ostojic",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1007/s00394-017-1600-2",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "3003–3005",
journal = "European Journal of Nutrition",
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Dietary guanidinoacetic acid does not accumulate in the brain of healthy men. / Ostojic, Sergej M.; Ostojic, Jelena.

I: European Journal of Nutrition, Bind 57, Nr. 8, 12.2018, s. 3003–3005.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftLetterForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary guanidinoacetic acid does not accumulate in the brain of healthy men

AU - Ostojic, Sergej M.

AU - Ostojic, Jelena

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - We conducted a secondary analysis of a previously completed trial to determine the effects of 8-week guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) loading on brain GAA levels in five healthy men. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was taken at baseline and post-administration, with spectra additionally analyzed for brain GAA and glutamate concentrations using TARQUIN 4.3.10 software. Brain GAA levels remained essentially unchanged at follow-up (an increase of 7.7% from baseline levels; 95% confidence interval, - 24.1% to 39.5%; P = 0.88) when averaged across 12 white and grey matter voxel locations. No significant changes were found for brain glutamate levels during the study (P = 0.64). Supplemental GAA appears to be safe intervention concerning brain GAA deposition, at least with GAA dosages used.

AB - We conducted a secondary analysis of a previously completed trial to determine the effects of 8-week guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) loading on brain GAA levels in five healthy men. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was taken at baseline and post-administration, with spectra additionally analyzed for brain GAA and glutamate concentrations using TARQUIN 4.3.10 software. Brain GAA levels remained essentially unchanged at follow-up (an increase of 7.7% from baseline levels; 95% confidence interval, - 24.1% to 39.5%; P = 0.88) when averaged across 12 white and grey matter voxel locations. No significant changes were found for brain glutamate levels during the study (P = 0.64). Supplemental GAA appears to be safe intervention concerning brain GAA deposition, at least with GAA dosages used.

KW - Glutamate

KW - Guanidinoacetic acid

KW - MR spectroscopy

KW - Supplementation

U2 - 10.1007/s00394-017-1600-2

DO - 10.1007/s00394-017-1600-2

M3 - Letter

VL - 57

SP - 3003

EP - 3005

JO - European Journal of Nutrition

JF - European Journal of Nutrition

SN - 1436-6207

IS - 8

ER -