Demographic senescence in herbaceous plants

Johan Dahlgren, Deborah A Roach

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Resumé

For herbaceous plants, in contrast to many higher animals but similarly to other modular and sedentary life forms, it is not so much a question of how senescence progresses as it is a question of whether senescence occurs at all for most species. Overall, both the empirical evidence and theoretical predictions provide contrasting evidence. Monocarpic species and other semelparous life forms are an extreme example of senescence. For polycarpic, iteroparous plants, however, there is only limited evidence that senescence occurs at all. Our review of studies with herbaceous plants also shows that there are only a few studies with detailed age-based demographic data, and here too the evidence for senescence is limited. Moreover, the detrimental effects of ageing are hard to detect in the observational studies upon which most of our current knowledge is built. Our theoretical expectations suggest that it is likely that the evolutionary pressure that shapes senescence in other organisms also acts on plants, but there are also several aspects of plant biology that conflict with some of the assumptions in classical models of the evolution of senescence.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelThe Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life
RedaktørerRichard P. Shefferson, Owen R. Jones, Roberto Salguero-Gómez
ForlagCambridge University Press
Publikationsdato2017
Sider303-319
Kapitel15
ISBN (Trykt)9781107078505, 9781139939867
ISBN (Elektronisk)9781108139083
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

herbaceous plants
demographic statistics
plant biology
observational studies
prediction
organisms
animals
selection pressure

Citer dette

Dahlgren, J., & Roach, D. A. (2017). Demographic senescence in herbaceous plants. I R. P. Shefferson, O. R. Jones, & R. Salguero-Gómez (red.), The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life (s. 303-319). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139939867.015
Dahlgren, Johan ; Roach, Deborah A. / Demographic senescence in herbaceous plants. The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life. red. / Richard P. Shefferson ; Owen R. Jones ; Roberto Salguero-Gómez. Cambridge University Press, 2017. s. 303-319
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Dahlgren, J & Roach, DA 2017, Demographic senescence in herbaceous plants. i RP Shefferson, OR Jones & R Salguero-Gómez (red), The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life. Cambridge University Press, s. 303-319. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139939867.015

Demographic senescence in herbaceous plants. / Dahlgren, Johan; Roach, Deborah A.

The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life. red. / Richard P. Shefferson; Owen R. Jones; Roberto Salguero-Gómez. Cambridge University Press, 2017. s. 303-319.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

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Dahlgren J, Roach DA. Demographic senescence in herbaceous plants. I Shefferson RP, Jones OR, Salguero-Gómez R, red., The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life. Cambridge University Press. 2017. s. 303-319 https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139939867.015