Degradation of wren Troglodytes troglodytes song: Implications for information transfer and ranging

Jo Holland*, Torben Dabelsteen, Simon Boel Pedersen, Ole Næsbye Larsen

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Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The effects of bird song imply a transfer of information between conspecifics. This communication channel is constrained by habitat-induced degradation. Many studies suggest that birds can utilize features of degraded song to assess relative distance to the signaller (ranging). The degradation of transmitted song in the wren Troglodytes troglodytes is quantified to assess the opportunities offered in received song for both information transfer and ranging. This quantification incorporates three measurable aspects of degradation: signal-to-noise ratio; excess attenuation; blur ratio. Each aspect varies more-or-less predictably with transmission distance, i.e., a criterion for ranging. Significant effects of speaker and microphone elevation indicate a potential for birds to optimize both the opportunity for information transfer and ranging by considering perch location. Song elements are the smallest units of a song being defined as a continuous trace on a sonagram. Main and second-order effects of element type indicate element-specific patterns of degradation which could be a crucial factor in communication in this species. The element variation within a full song offers the potential for effective information transfer over a range of relevant distances and a variety of transmission pathways. It similarly offers highly flexible ranging opportunities.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Vol/bind103
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)2154-2166
Antal sider13
ISSN0001-4966
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. apr. 1998

Fingeraftryk

information transfer
birds
degradation
communication
habitats
microphones
signal to noise ratios
attenuation
Degradation
Song

Citer dette

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abstract = "The effects of bird song imply a transfer of information between conspecifics. This communication channel is constrained by habitat-induced degradation. Many studies suggest that birds can utilize features of degraded song to assess relative distance to the signaller (ranging). The degradation of transmitted song in the wren Troglodytes troglodytes is quantified to assess the opportunities offered in received song for both information transfer and ranging. This quantification incorporates three measurable aspects of degradation: signal-to-noise ratio; excess attenuation; blur ratio. Each aspect varies more-or-less predictably with transmission distance, i.e., a criterion for ranging. Significant effects of speaker and microphone elevation indicate a potential for birds to optimize both the opportunity for information transfer and ranging by considering perch location. Song elements are the smallest units of a song being defined as a continuous trace on a sonagram. Main and second-order effects of element type indicate element-specific patterns of degradation which could be a crucial factor in communication in this species. The element variation within a full song offers the potential for effective information transfer over a range of relevant distances and a variety of transmission pathways. It similarly offers highly flexible ranging opportunities.",
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Degradation of wren Troglodytes troglodytes song : Implications for information transfer and ranging. / Holland, Jo; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pedersen, Simon Boel; Larsen, Ole Næsbye.

I: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Bind 103, Nr. 4, 01.04.1998, s. 2154-2166.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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