DEFINING THE NOTION OF CONCEPT MAPS 3.0

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

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Resumé

The aim of this poster is to present a proposal of how concept maps may be described, annotated and exposed on the Web of Data, also frequently known as the Semantic Web or Web 3.0. In doing so, the poster will first introduce the concept ofconcept maps 3.0 – that is, concept maps which utilize, and are enriched by, Web 3.0 technologies and resources. While conceptmaps 1.0 and 2.0 may be said to reflect earlier generations of the Web, the web of documents and the social web, the utilization ofWeb 3.0 technologies allows concept maps 3.0 to become machine-interpretable semantic web resources, and perhaps even semantic learning resources. This has several implications. One is that concept map discoverability can undoubtedly be improved through metadata annotation and the use of search engine interpretable vocabularies such as hts://schema.org/. Also, a key featureof Web 3.0 is that it supports integration of data, and that it makes it possible to identify “meaning” of concepts with unique URL identifiers. By employing an open data repository like Wikidata (https://www.wikidata.org), which provides identifiers for all entities contained in it, it becomes possible to uniquely identify concepts and concept types in a map as well as integrate data about these same concepts found in external semantic web resources that make use of the same Wikidata identifiers. These are just some of the interesting possibilities of concept maps 3.0. Another possibility is the ability to generate varied and dynamic visualizations of integrated data automatically. The second key aim of this poster is to define the notion of concept maps 3.0 by adopting an existing set of recommendations for publishing data on the Web, namely the Web Data Principles (http://dret.github.io/webdata/) and transforming these into fundamental requirements for concept maps 3.0 as data sets. These fundamental requirements are 1) Concept maps should belinkable, that is accessible via persistent or stable identifiers. This obviously applies to the concept map as a whole but preferably also to its constituent parts. In this way, external resources can point to specific entities or objects in the structure. 2) Concept map distributions should be represented in open formats that do not require proprietary software for processing and whose source code is open to inspection. 3) Concept maps should be annotated by metadata using "well-known" and/or "well-documented" vocabularies. 4) Concept maps should be linked to other resources to enhance their informational or learning value. Links should be typed if possible to signal their communicational purpose and/or the nature of their target and to enable automatic processing. Individual concepts should be linked to external resources to better determine their identity. 5) Concept maps should be labeled with a license to signify when, where, how and by whom they may be put to use and under what circumstances. (Johnsen, L., & Jensen, J. (2016): “Towards Concept Maps 3.0 Visual Learning Designs as Web Data”). Finally, the poster will provide simple code examples of how concept maps 3.0 might be marked up using the schema.org vocabulary.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2016
StatusUdgivet - 2016
Begivenhed7th International Conference on Concept Mapping - Tallinn, Estland
Varighed: 5. sep. 20169. sep. 2016
Konferencens nummer: 7

Konference

Konference7th International Conference on Concept Mapping
Nummer7
LandEstland
ByTallinn
Periode05/09/201609/09/2016

Fingeraftryk

poster
resources
semantics
vocabulary
learning
license
search engine
visualization
utilization
ability
Values

Citer dette

Jensen, J., & Johnsen, L. (2016). DEFINING THE NOTION OF CONCEPT MAPS 3.0. Poster session præsenteret på 7th International Conference on Concept Mapping, Tallinn, Estland.
Jensen, Jesper ; Johnsen, Lars. / DEFINING THE NOTION OF CONCEPT MAPS 3.0. Poster session præsenteret på 7th International Conference on Concept Mapping, Tallinn, Estland.
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author = "Jesper Jensen and Lars Johnsen",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 05-09-2016 Through 09-09-2016",

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Jensen, J & Johnsen, L 2016, 'DEFINING THE NOTION OF CONCEPT MAPS 3.0' 7th International Conference on Concept Mapping, Tallinn, Estland, 05/09/2016 - 09/09/2016, .

DEFINING THE NOTION OF CONCEPT MAPS 3.0. / Jensen, Jesper ; Johnsen, Lars.

2016. Poster session præsenteret på 7th International Conference on Concept Mapping, Tallinn, Estland.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

TY - CONF

T1 - DEFINING THE NOTION OF CONCEPT MAPS 3.0

AU - Jensen, Jesper

AU - Johnsen, Lars

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The aim of this poster is to present a proposal of how concept maps may be described, annotated and exposed on the Web of Data, also frequently known as the Semantic Web or Web 3.0. In doing so, the poster will first introduce the concept ofconcept maps 3.0 – that is, concept maps which utilize, and are enriched by, Web 3.0 technologies and resources. While conceptmaps 1.0 and 2.0 may be said to reflect earlier generations of the Web, the web of documents and the social web, the utilization ofWeb 3.0 technologies allows concept maps 3.0 to become machine-interpretable semantic web resources, and perhaps even semantic learning resources. This has several implications. One is that concept map discoverability can undoubtedly be improved through metadata annotation and the use of search engine interpretable vocabularies such as hts://schema.org/. Also, a key featureof Web 3.0 is that it supports integration of data, and that it makes it possible to identify “meaning” of concepts with unique URL identifiers. By employing an open data repository like Wikidata (https://www.wikidata.org), which provides identifiers for all entities contained in it, it becomes possible to uniquely identify concepts and concept types in a map as well as integrate data about these same concepts found in external semantic web resources that make use of the same Wikidata identifiers. These are just some of the interesting possibilities of concept maps 3.0. Another possibility is the ability to generate varied and dynamic visualizations of integrated data automatically. The second key aim of this poster is to define the notion of concept maps 3.0 by adopting an existing set of recommendations for publishing data on the Web, namely the Web Data Principles (http://dret.github.io/webdata/) and transforming these into fundamental requirements for concept maps 3.0 as data sets. These fundamental requirements are 1) Concept maps should belinkable, that is accessible via persistent or stable identifiers. This obviously applies to the concept map as a whole but preferably also to its constituent parts. In this way, external resources can point to specific entities or objects in the structure. 2) Concept map distributions should be represented in open formats that do not require proprietary software for processing and whose source code is open to inspection. 3) Concept maps should be annotated by metadata using "well-known" and/or "well-documented" vocabularies. 4) Concept maps should be linked to other resources to enhance their informational or learning value. Links should be typed if possible to signal their communicational purpose and/or the nature of their target and to enable automatic processing. Individual concepts should be linked to external resources to better determine their identity. 5) Concept maps should be labeled with a license to signify when, where, how and by whom they may be put to use and under what circumstances. (Johnsen, L., & Jensen, J. (2016): “Towards Concept Maps 3.0 Visual Learning Designs as Web Data”). Finally, the poster will provide simple code examples of how concept maps 3.0 might be marked up using the schema.org vocabulary.

AB - The aim of this poster is to present a proposal of how concept maps may be described, annotated and exposed on the Web of Data, also frequently known as the Semantic Web or Web 3.0. In doing so, the poster will first introduce the concept ofconcept maps 3.0 – that is, concept maps which utilize, and are enriched by, Web 3.0 technologies and resources. While conceptmaps 1.0 and 2.0 may be said to reflect earlier generations of the Web, the web of documents and the social web, the utilization ofWeb 3.0 technologies allows concept maps 3.0 to become machine-interpretable semantic web resources, and perhaps even semantic learning resources. This has several implications. One is that concept map discoverability can undoubtedly be improved through metadata annotation and the use of search engine interpretable vocabularies such as hts://schema.org/. Also, a key featureof Web 3.0 is that it supports integration of data, and that it makes it possible to identify “meaning” of concepts with unique URL identifiers. By employing an open data repository like Wikidata (https://www.wikidata.org), which provides identifiers for all entities contained in it, it becomes possible to uniquely identify concepts and concept types in a map as well as integrate data about these same concepts found in external semantic web resources that make use of the same Wikidata identifiers. These are just some of the interesting possibilities of concept maps 3.0. Another possibility is the ability to generate varied and dynamic visualizations of integrated data automatically. The second key aim of this poster is to define the notion of concept maps 3.0 by adopting an existing set of recommendations for publishing data on the Web, namely the Web Data Principles (http://dret.github.io/webdata/) and transforming these into fundamental requirements for concept maps 3.0 as data sets. These fundamental requirements are 1) Concept maps should belinkable, that is accessible via persistent or stable identifiers. This obviously applies to the concept map as a whole but preferably also to its constituent parts. In this way, external resources can point to specific entities or objects in the structure. 2) Concept map distributions should be represented in open formats that do not require proprietary software for processing and whose source code is open to inspection. 3) Concept maps should be annotated by metadata using "well-known" and/or "well-documented" vocabularies. 4) Concept maps should be linked to other resources to enhance their informational or learning value. Links should be typed if possible to signal their communicational purpose and/or the nature of their target and to enable automatic processing. Individual concepts should be linked to external resources to better determine their identity. 5) Concept maps should be labeled with a license to signify when, where, how and by whom they may be put to use and under what circumstances. (Johnsen, L., & Jensen, J. (2016): “Towards Concept Maps 3.0 Visual Learning Designs as Web Data”). Finally, the poster will provide simple code examples of how concept maps 3.0 might be marked up using the schema.org vocabulary.

KW - concep maps

KW - semantic web

KW - semantic metadata

M3 - Poster

ER -

Jensen J, Johnsen L. DEFINING THE NOTION OF CONCEPT MAPS 3.0. 2016. Poster session præsenteret på 7th International Conference on Concept Mapping, Tallinn, Estland.